Oxford English Dictionary adds 'tweet' to its repertoire, breaking own rules

Language is constantly evolving, and the past few decades have been very good ones for the English language. Words such as "gigabyte" would have been near meaningless 30 years ago, and now your average 12-year-old knows how many "gigs" a laptop hard drive is.

Unsurprisingly, more words are constantly being added, and the Oxford English Dictionary has introduced a new definition for "tweet." The Dictionary has therefore broken its own rules, that a word must be in use for a decade or more before inclusion. Twitter is seven years old at the moment, so they're three years out. This is perhaps not too surprising, for they're pushing to revise the Oxford English Dictionary.

"Follow" has also been revised to include tracking someone on a social media website, while the words "flash mob" and "live blog" are also new entries. Flash mobs are groups of people who meet at a certain point, often in droves, having arranged it over the Internet.

The speed language evolves at makes it difficult to remember all these changes, Google's handy "define:" search can turn up these new meanings, and the Merriam-Webster Dictionary also includes the definition for tweet. So there we have it; if you want to redefine a word, make it a focal point in a major website.

Source: PC World

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Meh, SWAG does not mean what it used to. "Secretly we are gay" Before that it used to mean something like a saggy ball sack or some crap. Fook knows what it means now people seam to say it all the time.

When did we ever move away from a dictionary being a definition book for WORDS! and move into a book of phrase or acronym definitions?

Like it or not but the English language is growing. New words are being made and existing words are getting new definitions.

Anaron said,
Like it or not but the English language is growing. New words are being made and existing words are getting new definitions.

English language might be growing but what good is it when more and more (especially younger) people are growing more and more illiterate. I'm a foreigner yet it amazes me how often I meet people who speak and write way worse than I do...

Obry said,

English language might be growing but what good is it when more and more (especially younger) people are growing more and more illiterate. I'm a foreigner yet it amazes me how often I meet people who speak and write way worse than I do...

Illiterate means you can't read and write. And nearly every first world country has a 99% literacy rate. As for poor spelling and grammar, that's another issue. I personally haven't come across people with spelling and grammar issues aside from mixing up "their/they're", "your/you're", and other "am/I'm".

Obry said,

English language might be growing but what good is it when more and more (especially younger) people are growing more and more illiterate. I'm a foreigner yet it amazes me how often I meet people who speak and write way worse than I do...

Irony?

I just graduated from high school and I think it's disappointing, the lack for proper spelling and grammar some of my former classmates have. It's not like I expect them to know how to spell every single word out there, but how hard is it to remember to, say, put a period at the end of a sentence and capitalize the next letter?

Anaron said,
Illiterate means you can't read and write. And nearly every first world country has a 99% literacy rate. As for poor spelling and grammar, that's another issue. I personally haven't come across people with spelling and grammar issues aside from mixing up "their/they're", "your/you're", and other "am/I'm".

Must be where you live then. I live in Florida (unfortunately) and it is really bad over here.

*sigh*.... soon we'll be seeing "LOLZ" and "YOLO" in the dictionary. Oh how the English language is degrading lol.

Or facepalm when your successors say that "You only yolo once!" and not sound sarcastic. ( said by my 13 yr old nephew )

I bet you the average 12yr old doesn't know how many "gigabytes" a laptop hard drive is, if they haven't been schooled in base 10 and base 2 to know why they are or aren't wrong...

A twelve year old would probably get it right, and we'd get it wrong. Because of some marketing magic, most hard drive sizes are calculated as base-10, so a 128GB hard drive would contain 128 billion bytes of storage. A 2GB stick of RAM on the other hand is calculated in base-2, and would contain 2147483648 bytes

Hard drive marketing is the reason we're all having to talk in GiB and MiB instead of GB and MB (although technically the former is more correct).

Unfortunately, everyone under the age of 21 (and over the age of 40, for some reason) seems to think that the average PC has 500 gigs of "memory", rather than 500 gigs of "storage"... probably my biggest pet peeve.

mdcdesign said,
Unfortunately, everyone under the age of 21 (and over the age of 40, for some reason) seems to think that the average PC has 500 gigs of "memory", rather than 500 gigs of "storage"... probably my biggest pet peeve.

That's because it technically is memory... it's a type of memory, but those of us who have been in comp sci for a long time like to differentiate it a lot more... We segment it into Storage, processing memory and cache