Oxford English Dictionary finally recognises 'wiki'

The Oxford English Dictionary has recognized the word 'wiki' as a word, among many others in its latest quarterly update. 'Wiki' began life as 'wiki wiki', a Hawaiian word meaning 'quick', but the OED has recognised the abbreviated version as "a type of web page designed so that its content can be edited by anyone who accesses it, using a simplified mark-up language". As usual, OED has taken its sweet time with accepting the recent addition of 'wiki', as it has with previous terms that many use on a daily basis (such as the verb 'to google' which was not included until last year).

View: Words Added in the Quarterly Update
News source: vnunet

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Id love to be paid for deciding what words should be added to a dictionary, its up on my list of jobs inlcuding porn director and comittee member for deciding whether Pluto is a planet or not.

Oxford English Dictionary is just a .COM site, not a .edu, ac.uk,.org, .gov or such.

Anyways what's the fxck meaning of pre-feminist?

Indeed. When other such crap as "D'oh" got put in I ceased to consider OED as any definitive work but rather a list of colloquialisms. Seeing the recent BBC programmes about when a certain word first came into usage (like Mackem) confirmed my opinion that whatever they think goes, regardless of any contrary evidence.
In fifty years when all these colloquialisms and fly-by-night terminology has been superceded (or ignored) then they become part of the ever expanding archaic section which would mean "bootylicious" would rank alongside Shakespearean words / phrases such as "fain", "an" (meaning if, not a singular preceding a vowel sound), "to boot" (in addition to, as well, also), etc..

Some of the new entries are just pure laziness on the part of people: "antivenom". No, the word is antivenin. Just because you're thick doesn't mean everybody else has to be. Plenty of nouns that have become verbs abound like "chef". The verb is "cook"; a chef cooks, (s)he does not chef. Ixnay is a particularly annoying one. Not only is it not remotely commonplace in British English, it is an igpay atinlay word (and thus only eligible for inclusion in a Pig Latin dictionary) derived from the New Yorker word "nix" (originally German). So whilst (another archaism right there) it can be included in Webber's, it has no place in OED. But then, what do I know, I only speak the bloody language correctly.

mrbester said,
Indeed. When other such crap as "D'oh" got put in I ceased to consider OED as any definitive work but rather a list of colloquialisms. Seeing the recent BBC programmes about when a certain word first came into usage (like Mackem) confirmed my opinion that whatever they think goes, regardless of any contrary evidence.
In fifty years when all these colloquialisms and fly-by-night terminology has been superceded (or ignored) then they become part of the ever expanding archaic section which would mean "bootylicious" would rank alongside Shakespearean words / phrases such as "fain", "an" (meaning if, not a singular preceding a vowel sound), "to boot" (in addition to, as well, also), etc..

Some of the new entries are just pure laziness on the part of people: "antivenom". No, the word is antivenin. Just because you're thick doesn't mean everybody else has to be. Plenty of nouns that have become verbs abound like "chef". The verb is "cook"; a chef cooks, (s)he does not chef. Ixnay is a particularly annoying one. Not only is it not remotely commonplace in British English, it is an igpay atinlay word (and thus only eligible for inclusion in a Pig Latin dictionary) derived from the New Yorker word "nix" (originally German). So whilst (another archaism right there) it can be included in Webber's, it has no place in OED. But then, what do I know, I only speak the bloody language correctly.

Well said!