Patch Tuesday: Record breaking 16 bulletins, 49 vulnerabilities

Microsoft is set to release a record breaking Patch Tuesday that contains 16 bulletins, fixing 49 vulnerabilities, according to the advanced notification. Microsoft patches security holes and vulnerabilities in all of their software products on the second Tuesday of each month.

Microsoft first set the record for most vulnerabilities patched on June 2010, and again two months later in August, when they fixed 34 vulnerabilities.

Out of the 16 bulletins, four are labeled as critical - Microsoft's highest security rating, 10 are labeled as important - the second highest security rating, and two are labeled as moderate. The patches will address a number of remote code executions, elevation of privileges, denial of service and tampering.

The fixes will affect a number of Windows operating systems, including Windows Vista and 7, server software and Microsoft Office.

Affected software:

  • Windows XP Service Pack 3
  • Windows Vista Service Pack 1 & 2
  • Windows 7
  • Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2
  • Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 2
  • Microsoft Office XP Service Pack 3
  • Microsoft Office 2003 Service Pack 3
  • Microsoft Office 2007 Service Pack 2
  • Microsoft Office 2010
  • Microsoft Office 2004 for Mac
  • Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac
  • Open XML file format converter for Mac
  • Microsoft Word and Excel viewer
  • Microsoft Office compatibility pack for Word, Excel and PowerPoint 2007 SP2
  • Windows SharePoint Services 3.0
  • Windows SharePoint Foundation 2010
  • Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007
  • Microsoft Groove Server 2010
  • Microsoft Office Web Apps

Some of these updates will require a restart. Affected software includes both 32-bit and 64-bit, where applicable.

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32 Comments

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If you guys just want to restart Windows, after updating.. but not reboot the whole machine, simply close Windows Update, then click Start, hold down the Shift key, and click Restart.

Windows 95 used to do this, without rebooting the whole system.. would just say "Restarting Windows" and that was it.

You'd think Windows would be able to do this all by itself without the need to reboot the whole system, running BIOS tests.. etc.

xMorpheousx416 said,
Windows 95 used to do this, without rebooting the whole system.. would just say "Restarting Windows" and that was it.

Windows 95 (and 98 and ME as well) were running on top of a DOS kernel, which is how you were able to restart Windows without rebooting the machine.

roadwarrior said,

Windows 95 (and 98 and ME as well) were running on top of a DOS kernel, which is how you were able to restart Windows without rebooting the machine.

They actually removed real mode DOS from Windows Me so it wasn't possible to shut down to DOS or restart that way, which I recall prompted a huge amount of complaints. There was an unofficial patch released to restore the real mode DOS loader soon afterward.

/useless trivia

I have to imagine how many people would complain about their seatbelt not working, when they didn't bother to go in for the recall on it.

Not patching is the equivalent.

As long as Windows Update is turned on, ...there should be no alarm. I have been running Windows systems for years and no matter how sensationalized the media makes a lot of these vulnerabilities seem, none of my 3 Windows desktops have ever been compromised. Regardless though, Windows remains the most popular operating system in the world, with 95% market share, so of course this going to make it a target. Which would you prefer though, Microsoft doing something about it or just pretending there is no such thing as vulnerabilities in an operating system.

BTW, 16 are critical, while the other 33 might not even needed since Microsoft develops more than Windows, Office and IE. The good thing is, they are ensuring product is secure. Kudos.

Oh brilliant, what a lot more work than usual for me on Wednesday morning patching allot of networks servers then :-/

StevenNT said,
Oh brilliant, what a lot more work than usual for me on Wednesday morning patching allot of networks servers then :-/

How much work could it be? I've got about 30 servers and it takes me about an hour to reboot servers in a specific order due to our environment; which I do afterhours.

RPD, reboot, wait and check that they come back...rinse and repeat.

TheReasonIFailed said,

How much work could it be? I've got about 30 servers and it takes me about an hour to reboot servers in a specific order due to our environment; which I do afterhours.

RPD, reboot, wait and check that they come back...rinse and repeat.

Only 30 that's nothing compared to our establishment. We have about 70VM's and 30 physical servers (no joke) and as I'm not an Domain Administrator I don't even have remote access, so have to be on site to do it. It's a almost well drilled operation, just a pain in the arse to come in at 6.30am to do it before the working day starts.

dreamsburnred said,
Haha. Oh wells, ill be waiting for Ubuntu 10.10 .

first time using ubuntu ? if yes
then you should know that there is also a lot of security updates

darkfanar said,

first time using ubuntu ? if yes
then you should know that there is also a lot of security updates

Yes, in Linux there are a lot of updates. Even it gets to 100MB in one week !!

deep1234 said,

Yes, in Linux there are a lot of updates. Even it gets to 100MB in one week !!

Ironic isn't it. Linux is more secure than windows, so you would think it wouldn't need as many security updates. Maybe that's what makes Linux more secure is the frequent security updates? Is there a patch Tuesday for Ubuntu?

WV2MJR said,

Ironic isn't it. Linux is more secure than windows, so you would think it wouldn't need as many security updates. Maybe that's what makes Linux more secure is the frequent security updates? Is there a patch Tuesday for Ubuntu?

Aren't most Linux patches not for security but to fix other problems? Sure it's more secure but it's also incredibly buggy in comparison to Windows.

WV2MJR said,

Ironic isn't it. Linux is more secure than windows, so you would think it wouldn't need as many security updates. Maybe that's what makes Linux more secure is the frequent security updates? Is there a patch Tuesday for Ubuntu?

Most of the security updates are for programs included with the distro, not an integral part of it. That's one thing I like about Linux is that you don't have separate updates for every program you have installed. Just run the updater and it does everything for you.

farmeunit said,

Most of the security updates are for programs included with the distro, not an integral part of it. That's one thing I like about Linux is that you don't have separate updates for every program you have installed. Just run the updater and it does everything for you.

Yes that is the Number 1 wish list for Windows 8 or Windows 4024238432842093 (I'd be dead by then, surly ).

techbeck said,
Cool....love how MS provides frequent updates.

But I hate how they make me restart so often! Argh. They need to get some kind of live update system for Windows 8 where it doesn't nag you at all and you don't even notice anything happened.

SHoTTa35 said,
Get ready to kill those uptime people!

-1 =[ ... Only because I have been enjoying a period of no blackouts lately! Oh Well...

SHoTTa35 said,
Get ready to kill those uptime people!

The only time I ever restart is for patches. Usually just sleep it when I'm not using it.

radwimp said,

Man I've got an uptime of 45 days going... oh well.

why not just giving up with the idea of having great uptimes? if your PC is idle at night you are just wasting energy, and causing more and more pollution

robert_dll said,

why not just giving up with the idea of having great uptimes? if your PC is idle at night you are just wasting energy, and causing more and more pollution

I don't worry about uptimes myself, but I leave 2 comps on 24/7. However, they both go into monitor sleep after a set time. I don't do anything else with the comps since powering up and down is just as bad if not worse than a cold start on a car. I still run a traditional HDD , the day I switch over to a SSD then I will likely start powering all the way down at that point.

robert_dll said,

why not just giving up with the idea of having great uptimes? if your PC is idle at night you are just wasting energy, and causing more and more pollution

Well my PC is never idle, so I don't consider 24/7 to be a huge contribution on the pollution front.

As for uptimes, it's just kind of a cool novelty to see a PC being stable for that long. It's not a huge deal or anything, I guess its just residual coolness after growing up on '98 PCs that tended to crash after 3 or more days

It's amazing how people don't bother updating Windows, and then they complain that their computer keep crashing or there's a virus or it's been hacked. Update, people!