Piracy lost software industry over $50 billion in 2009

The Business Software Alliance (BSA) said in their annual report that 43% of software used on computers worldwide in 2009 was pirated. This is an increase from the 41% recorded in 2008 and high piracy rates in Asia are believed to be the main cause. 

AFP on Tuesday released the $51.4 billion figure for 2009 saying the average piracy rate in the Asia Pacific region was 59% of all software installed costing $16.5 billion. The growth of illegal software was blamed on the expanding PC market in the fast growing economies in Brazil, India and China. 

However 2009 saw an actual 3% drop in losses compared to 2008 as the rate of pirated software fell in 54 economies of the economies studied, remained even in 38 and rose in 19.

In the Asia Pacific region 530 million of the 900 million units of software installed last year were unlicensed. The top piracy rates were found in Bangladesh with Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Vietnam following. China and India were also cited as some of the worst culprits.

BSA's vice president and regional director Jeffrey Hardee said although efforts to lower piracy rates are seeing some successes in the region the piracy rates were still too high. "This is unacceptable and there is still much to be done to engage governments, businesses and consumers on the risks and impact of software piracy."

Georgia took the crown for the world's top pirate software user with 95% of all software used in the country deemed illegal. Zimbabwe (92%), Bangladesh (91%), Moldova (91%), Armenia (90%) and Yemen (90%) rounded out the top six offenders. 

In contrast the top five least offending nations were the United States with 20%, Japan (21%), Luxembourg (21%), New Zealand (22%) and finally Australia (25%). 

Hardee said he believed not only were global technology companies suffering from the piracy rates, but small and medium software makers were being affected as well. He continued by saying a 10% reduction in the software piracy rate over four years in the Asia Pacific region would generate an extra $41 billion to the regional economy. An additional 435,000 jobs would be created along with $5.4 billion in taxes and increased revenues to local vendors of $33 billion.

Hardee also said instead of individuals causing the worst piracy losses it was rather companies using pirated software as they may not have adequate software management policies. "Surprisingly, quite a few listed companies are caught using pirated software ... It's quite shocking."

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Every time to jack up prices beyond what the market will bear, they complain about piracy, or the "used" market. Just blanket calculations of X priacy = X lost sales is completely wrong as well.

Until they start making games better (less sequel / copies), play longer, more originality, adding common sense DRM that doesn't treat legit users like crminals where the real pirates remove all protection. There living in there own world.

Made good quality, affordable games, with sensible drm then the problem will start to take care of itself. When this happens social pressure will cut down on privacy by removing the "bad guy" trait game publishers have picked up.

The title of this article is misleading. The amount of money "lost" to piracy is unknown. What's posted in the AFP's report is conjecture, not fact, and should be labeled as such.

There was a previous article here stating that pirate would buy software if price was lower. all the anti-pirates said that it's false, pirates would never buy.

Now in this article, where pirates claim they wold never buy it in the first place, anti-pirates say that that isn't true.

Hypocrisy too much? These people just want money.

The BSA has every motivation to exagerate any figures, because they make their living off of doing this.

Plus, how much money has software companies stolen from their customers? Through overpriced software, or not giving support after you have purchased it, or not letting a person return software once it has been opened. That is stealing, pure stealing because they are taking actual money.

People!!! Ignore this ridiculous article! The people who came up with these statistics are trying to brainwash you and make you think that by owning a computer you are a pirate and a criminal! Do not listen to it for a second. The BSA is yet another organization that is corrupt and has money pumped into it by the government and high ranking investors looking to protect their million-dollar salaries. I know for a fact that these numbers are not even close to the actual value which is in the millions and very few millions. Please don't do these corrupt pieces of **** from the BSA or RIAA or MPAA a favor by buying into their utter bull**** and propaganda! Do your part in overturning this corrupt system and just ignore anything they say.

Honestly, I have pirated before... but here is the thing, in almost all cases I pirated because I couldn't afford to buy it. Specifically I needed video editing software. I purchased some of the crappy $100 software but it couldn't do what I needed so I got a pirated version of Sony Vegas Pro. I would totally have purchased the software if it were reasonably priced, unfortunately it was way out of my price range and it did what I needed it to do. Since then I have erased it from my system because I no longer video edit.

Today I lost 3 trillion billion dollars, because of everyone pirating my invention of a item that converts Carbon Dioxide into Oxygen, I call this invention "PLANT" Everywhere I see there are plants everywhere FUUUUU!!!

Individuals pirating software to learn something on their home computers is one thing, but when businesses pirate software that really angers me. I'm glad my company pays me for the software that I write for them.

Shadrack said,
Individuals pirating software to learn something on their home computers is one thing, but when businesses pirate software that really angers me. I'm glad my company pays me for the software that I write for them.

Yea, business that pirate should be prosecuted to the fullest extent. As I mentioned above, not only are they stealing from the developers, but then they are making a profit as well off of their (the developers) loss. Would be neat to see a try it (if you make money) then buy it.. Almost like a rent to won. Not sure how that would work out legally.

Come to think of it, thats basically a Net 90 but extended.

+1

I'm not sure why these industries feel that they are immune to the effects of recessions. The music companies were complaining that fewer people were buying albums recently - that may have had something to do with the fact that when times are tough you don't immediately go out and buy the Lady Gaga cd, instead you pay for the little luxuries like food/mortgage/bills.

In other world news, World Wide Recession/Depression going around, people most likely using that 50 billion to try and live... in a world where materialistic values seem to be dominant but people are having a hard enough time trying to just live, there should be a huge drop in what is purchased based on what it has to actually offer a person and survivability/sustainability.

I lost out on an extra £7000 pounds last year because my employer didn't pay me what I think i'm worth. Can someone call the waambulance for me

What is sad is that companies doesn't understand that piracy would be reduced if they drop their prices... in Mexico for instance, a copy of Windows 7 Ultimate would be priced in $7000 pesos (around $500 US), when a regular monthly salary is $6000 pesos, who the hell is gonna buy it?

You may say, if you're poor then why would you want 7 ultimate... Ok, imagine that I want to run a gocery store and I want Excel to keep track of my sales/expenses, I would need a copy of windows xp (the cheapest) at $1300 pesos (like $100) and a copy of ms office which would be around $5000 pesos (like $400 US)... is that affordable? NO! not with the actual economy... so, what people do? scr3w microsoft and install pirate copies of the software.

That's the truth, It hard to see it when your currency is one of the top, but look down, and you'll understand.

Not long ago, some people started an iniciative which offered original music cd's in $50 pesos instead of the regular $150... they sold a lot and no illegal copies where detected in the places where piracy is the main bussines... what did that mean? it means that everyone wants the better, but for a reasonable price.

Here applies 'It's better to sell a lot of cheap items than a few expensive ones'

Just a point from the 3rd world...

ReznorX said,
What is sad is that companies doesn't understand that piracy would be reduced if they drop their prices... in Mexico for instance, a copy of Windows 7 Ultimate would be priced in $7000 pesos (around $500 US), when a regular monthly salary is $6000 pesos, who the hell is gonna buy it?

You may say, if you're poor then why would you want 7 ultimate... Ok, imagine that I want to run a gocery store and I want Excel to keep track of my sales/expenses, I would need a copy of windows xp (the cheapest) at $1300 pesos (like $100) and a copy of ms office which would be around $5000 pesos (like $400 US)... is that affordable? NO! not with the actual economy... so, what people do? scr3w microsoft and install pirate copies of the software.

That's the truth, It hard to see it when your currency is one of the top, but look down, and you'll understand.

Not long ago, some people started an iniciative which offered original music cd's in $50 pesos instead of the regular $150... they sold a lot and no illegal copies where detected in the places where piracy is the main bussines... what did that mean? it means that everyone wants the better, but for a reasonable price.

Here applies 'It's better to sell a lot of cheap items than a few expensive ones'

Just a point from the 3rd world...

Well as it's a business they should go through an outlet like Dell.com and just purchase new hardware and receive a license at that price. A vostro desktop line would run $616 (converted from MXN to US) with windows 7 enterprise.

Just saying.. I see no excuse for a business to be running pirated software. That is bad business practice, because A. not only are the taking from another company but B. they are profiting off of that persons loss.

Edited by SaltLife, May 11 2010, 5:35pm :

You know, publishing stories like this just continues to lend the BS Association credibility these days. Time and time again these piracy figures have been shown to have been pulled out of thin air.

The fact is the people who pirated the software would not have purchased them anyway. Therefore, there was almost no loss.

Software vendors should be making money from support and not from the actual sale of software. Give software fro free.

Exactly. Pirated software does not equate lost revenue.
It's the same as if they say that people who cook themselves and eat at home
make restaurants lose a lot of money.

masterdoran said,
Exactly. Pirated software does not equate lost revenue.
It's the same as if they say that people who cook themselves and eat at home
make restaurants lose a lot of money.

+1
Also Piracy can be seen as free advertisement too.

masterdoran said,
Exactly. Pirated software does not equate lost revenue.
It's the same as if they say that people who cook themselves and eat at home
make restaurants lose a lot of money.

Cooking at home should be illegal

I have a feeling that these figures might be blown out of proportion in order to push their agendas, I agree that piracy can hurt the industry, however it's something that must be worked around with creativity, you're never going to stop piracy, it'll always be there, but it's not the end of the world

For instance look at Modern Warfare 2, it has a strong multiplayer presence that can't be achieved easily on pirated copies, and despite personally thinking that Kotick is a douche, it works.

Like others have said: You can't count a piracy "loss" if someone was NEVER going to buy the software in the first place.

Quick example: A lot of people that use Photoshop aren't going to spend $600 for it. If there was NO way to get Photoshop without paying, then they'd have to deal with Gimp, Paint.NET, or any other imaging program.

Massive, billion-dollar companies can't claim a "loss" when poor kids use their software. Nothing physical is lost, and they were never going to get money from it from certain users.

Of course, you can claim I'm wrong, as I have no proof. These insane "loss" claims by the big companies also have NO proof on their side either.

Xenomorph said,
Like others have said: You can't count a piracy "loss" if someone was NEVER going to buy the software in the first place.

Quick example: A lot of people that use Photoshop aren't going to spend $600 for it. If there was NO way to get Photoshop without paying, then they'd have to deal with Gimp, Paint.NET, or any other imaging program.

Massive, billion-dollar companies can't claim a "loss" when poor kids use their software. Nothing physical is lost, and they were never going to get money from it from certain users.

Of course, you can claim I'm wrong, as I have no proof. These insane "loss" claims by the big companies also have NO proof on their side either.

They're trying to measure new age events with old age mentality, it's not going to work, I agree with you, if they were not going to purchase it to begin with, can it really be counted as a loss? In their eyes it is, because they would rather restrict the software completely, than let people use it for free, so for them, they're getting a loss out of it.

The BSA fails to take into the account that the top six offending countries are not exactly wealthy countries like the top five and the living conditions of the populations are a world apart from the top five as well. Of course, it doesn't who the money is coming from for these corporations.

What will reducing piracy entail for these nations? Maybe they could give a big V and use free open source software in response.

Hell knows how they can quantify the losses. $50 billion of imaginary money.

Should-have said,
The BSA fails to take into the account that the top six offending countries are not exactly wealthy countries like the top five and the living conditions of the populations are a world apart from the top five as well. Of course, it doesn't who the money is coming from for these corporations.

What will reducing piracy entail for these nations? Maybe they could give a big V and use free open source software in response.

Hell knows how they can quantify the losses. $50 billion of imaginary money.

they also fail to take into account just how crappy the quality of the video game industry is putting out nowadays. nothing but drm laden ports that are buggier than a swamp in the summer time. its ridiculous how they cry tears about boo hoo we didnt make enough money, when EA puts out 30 sports games a year, and they are no different than last years games. i dont feel bad for companies who dont care about actually putting quality into games. Piracy is based on a few things, cost, quality, and drm. murphys law will apply to all of those, higher the cost, the more they steal, the lower the quality, the less they buy - more they pirate, and the more DRM, the more people wanna crack it and share it with the world. - thats only video games mind you - companies stealing corporate software is just...funny

Edited by Alex2190, May 11 2010, 1:40pm :

necrosis said,
More bull**** numbers pulled out of people's asses. Its next to imposable to calculate money lost to piracy.

Thank you. I was looking to post about the numbers that are posted. How could it be possible to know how much money was lost? It SEEMS that the numbers are pulled from thin air, but if someone has the math they use I would really like to see it.

Peace,
James

necrosis said,
More bull**** numbers pulled out of people's asses. Its next to imposable to calculate money lost to piracy.

yes it is just take whatever number they say and divide it by as many A holes who came up with it then subtract the amount of yearly bonus they got for coming up with that number and add 10 see easy

If they released their games in 3rd world countries for at least 10 dollars they'd probably see the loss turn into some profit. where I live people are willing enough to pay 4 dollars per dvd. Usual games use up 2dvds so they spend 8 dollars buying a pirated copy.
The pirates make piles of cash while the industry suffers. The industry could put the dvds In a paper case without a manual and people would still buy.
Most of the people around me make 200 dollars a month so i doubt they'd see a 40-60 dollar game as something worth buying when a cheaper pirated one is availabe.
*typed on my winmo phone so don't know if there are alot of mistakes*

killa_chain said,
If they released their games in 3rd world countries for at least 10 dollars they'd probably see the loss turn into some profit. where I live people are willing enough to pay 4 dollars per dvd. Usual games use up 2dvds so they spend 8 dollars buying a pirated copy.
The pirates make piles of cash while the industry suffers. The industry could put the dvds In a paper case without a manual and people would still buy.
Most of the people around me make 200 dollars a month so i doubt they'd see a 40-60 dollar game as something worth buying when a cheaper pirated one is availabe.
*typed on my winmo phone so don't know if there are alot of mistakes*

+1

SweetRiverBaynes said,
I have never bought an OS system disc since Windows 95. Until Snow Leopard came out. It was $30 and I bought it. If it is priced right, I WILL buy it.

I did buy 95, 98 and ME. I figured after ME they owed me a free XP. And then I did buy an OEM copy of Vista.
I also bought Snow Leopard as it was just $30 and setup a hackintosh. Yes, if things are priced reasonably I will buy them. Like those amazing game sales you see on steam. If I see a killer deal I buy it.
I will not buy ebooks. One, I got burned doing it before by the DRM and now I have a $25 ebook I can't read. Two, they are rediculously over priced. An ebook can just about go from the authors computer to yours and there are no materials involved. There is no reason for them to cost more than a paperback or anywhere near a hardcover. Same goes with music. You cut out the physical medium and the cost should go down. I'd pay a quarter a song but not a buck.
Blurays also need to cut the price in half at least. Come down to where DVD's are.

Blah. same old crap.

Here is an example of me.

I got a cracked copy of Spectaculator (ZX Spectrum emulator for windows).... why you ask, apart from having this legend of a machine as a kid and a massive fan on retro gaming ?

The reason was that the website only took credits cards which I dont have, by choice. Before you cry out. I went on the site this week and paypal has been added. I bought it straight away.

There are only a few reasons for piracy.

1. Price - The product is out of the price range of your normal joe bloggs.
2. Availability - Most pirated stuff gets on the web before the official release.
3. Payment methods - Not everyone has a credit card.

Well that my 2p's worth.

Stup0t said,
There are only a few reasons for piracy.

1. Price - The product is out of the price range of your normal joe bloggs.
2. Availability - Most pirated stuff gets on the web before the official release.
3. Payment methods - Not everyone has a credit card.


4. People just want stuff for free.

Not sure why you left that one out, because it is a major reason.

Stup0t said,
Blah. same old crap.

Here is an example of me.

I got a cracked copy of Spectaculator (ZX Spectrum emulator for windows).... why you ask, apart from having this legend of a machine as a kid and a massive fan on retro gaming ?

The reason was that the website only took credits cards which I dont have, by choice. Before you cry out. I went on the site this week and paypal has been added. I bought it straight away.

There are only a few reasons for piracy.

1. Price - The product is out of the price range of your normal joe bloggs.
2. Availability - Most pirated stuff gets on the web before the official release.
3. Payment methods - Not everyone has a credit card.

Well that my 2p's worth.

5. Restrictions-free. Best quality. While music stores are moving to lossless formats and no DRM, on the movie side were not there yet. Games seem to be getting worse, yet the cracked versions still always appear and they usually run with fewer problems too and are easier to run because you don't have to cram a DVD in that noisy drive.
6. Software quality. I have bought a lot more programs for Mac simply because the programs have been better made - they fit the OS looks, they follow its user interface design guidelines and are modern. Even the websites are much better.

i assume these numbers were pulled out of thin air w/o single valid argument backing it up ...
i remember quite often such studies claimed that PC full of opensource / free software == unlicensed pirate software etc.

anyway lot of the 'true' piracy (big sales of counterfeit goods) is because many software products are overpriced ...

Sorry, but these stories always make me chuckle. There's no guarantee that all or even most of that money would equate to sales were piracy eliminated. Many of these countries wouldn't be able to purchase the software if they wanted to and therefore cannot be assumed to be costing the industry money.

Although minimal (probably 0.01%) - some pirates might actually buy a product if they liked it. Then there are those that offer free promotion to certain products.

Not a defense of piracy, but the $50 billion claim is misleading and just a headline grabber imo.

Most of these developing countries just can't afford the software prices set. If those uesrs want any chance to compete technically with more developed countries skills such as the UK or USA then there is no alternative.

Fubar is right to a point. But there's some software that people WOULD'VE bought had they not been able to pirate it.

But he's right. I'm actually shocked the United States is the least offending. But obviously most of the countries up there probably don't have access to such software that they can purchase. Thats what I feel.

RedFlow said,
Fubar is right to a point. But there's some software that people WOULD'VE bought had they not been able to pirate it.

But he's right. I'm actually shocked the United States is the least offending. But obviously most of the countries up there probably don't have access to such software that they can purchase. Thats what I feel.

Most of the time software is more expensive in other countries.

Here in canada regular price of games is 70 CAD which equals to 68 USD which is 8$ more than the regular price in USA.

Store often reduce the price at 60$ but not for all games some stay at 70$ which is really too expensive for a game. 60# is already borderline.

Vista 7 home premium regular price is 225 CAD which iequals to 220 USD which is 20$ mor than you pay in USA.

And Canada prices are okay since canadian dollar fluctuate so they keep a margin to be safe. But the price in many countries is literally a steal specially in UK.

LaP said,

Most of the time software is more expensive in other countries.
And Canada prices are okay since canadian dollar fluctuate so they keep a margin to be safe. But the price in many countries is literally a steal specially in UK.

Actually, here in the UK we often get charged even more then that. If a game cost $50USD it should translate to around £35GBP roughly, but more often than not it costs £50GBP. We continusouly pay a lot more then a lot of countries, particularly the US and this is across the board for hardware and software and many other goods costs. Where you would expect the exchange rate to come into play it really doesn't.

Adobe CS5 Master Suite $2599USD direct from Adobe, UK price £2706GBP, translates to $3788USD (average exchange rate 1.4USD to 1GBP) the only UK steal is by the software company, we as UK retailers are not getting a steal

whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

Fubar said,
whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

How do you know that?

Pupik said,

The same way they know that they actually lost a sale; guess.

His claim was that none of the people who pirate it would have bought it. This is a highly questionable claim (actually, from experience, it's completely wrong.)

Now, whether there is a 1:1 relationship between piracy and lost sales, that's a completely different matter, but that is not what he said.

Fubar said,
whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

Because everyone who pirates Windows would settle for Linux otherwise... yeah...

hdood said,

His claim was that none of the people who pirate it would have bought it. This is a highly questionable claim (actually, from experience, it's completely wrong.)

Now, whether there is a 1:1 relationship between piracy and lost sales, that's a completely different matter, but that is not what he said.

And the article claims they lost 50 billion due to piracy which is utter balls along with the statement i made you see where im going with this? my facts are baseless just like theirs

Edited by Fubar, May 11 2010, 12:12pm :

Fubar said,
whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

+1 in my honest opinion

Fubar said,
whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

Hmm, I know it's wrong, but I'm not sad about this because it's the only leverage for change. I don't pirate anything, software, music, movies, because I have no need to. And that may be the answer. If we make software, music, movies, completely affordable then those numbers up there may change. Just a thought. Otherwise, 435,000 more people would make the software, music, movie prices go down? lol, greed is greed! Plus the problem with all of this money being shifted from the TANGIBLE side of the economy, and the added problem of who owns what, because possession is 9/10ths of the law in most countries.

Fubar said,
whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

i agree because while i am sure SOME would have bought it if they could not pirated it. you can be pretty damn certain that not everyone would have bought it. hence, there 'losses' are exaggerated.

Edited by ThaCrip, May 11 2010, 1:29pm :

ThaCrip said,

i agree because while i am sure SOME would have bought it if they could not pirated it. you can be pretty damn certain that not everyone would have bought it. hence, there 'losses' are exaggerated.

+1

Fubar said,
whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

cant agree more.

hdood said,

How do you know that?

You have to understand that the main problem here is the cost. the cost of windows in asian countries is one paycheck for many... lets be honest here will you pay ~$4000(paycheck) for windows.....

Fubar said,
whats sad is that you cant lose what you never had, people who pirated software wouldnt have bought it in the 1st place...

I fully agree. If I can get something for free, sure, i'll get it. Doesn't mean i'd buy it if I couldn't get it for free. Spending time in the scene and talking with those who have also pirated software I would say your statement is very true.

For me, i'm not going to buy anything with DRM. I've been screwed on this before. If I grab a game it's sometimes because the demo is lacking and I really want to try more features, or the DRM is just too much.
But lately i've been buying a number of games off of steam because they make it easy and the cost is low. They just had the complete Civilization IV series on sale for $10. I couldn't pass that up even though I had originally pirated it.

Who can honestly say they would EVER buy photoshop?
I'll admit I've got various pirate copies of it, doesn't mean I'd ever buy the bloody thing.

Although CS5 with the content aware filter....

n_K said,
Who can honestly say they would EVER buy photoshop?

People that are in a field that require it? They make the money back quickly anyway. It costs nothing compared to the money you make with it.

SputnikGamer said,
People that are in a field that require it? They make the money back quickly anyway. It costs nothing compared to the money you make with it.

Yes I gather that, I'm talking about on here though. I would bet many people here have PS, and didn't pay for it. It's the number 1 pirated piece of software.

archer75 said,

I fully agree. If I can get something for free, sure, i'll get it. Doesn't mean i'd buy it if I couldn't get it for free. Spending time in the scene and talking with those who have also pirated software I would say your statement is very true.

For me, i'm not going to buy anything with DRM. I've been screwed on this before. If I grab a game it's sometimes because the demo is lacking and I really want to try more features, or t
he DRM is just too much.
But lately i've been buying a number of games off of steam
because they make it easy and the cost is low. They just had the complete Civilization IV series on sale for $10. I couldn't pass that up even though I had originally pirated it.

+ 2000

hdood said,

How do you know that?

While the statement is no doubt somewhat hyperbole, just look at the top 5 countries they list for piracy. All poor-a** countries pretty much, where they are either really lucky just to own a computer, or the import costs for software have to be ridiculously high, with MAYBE the exception of Yemen.

still1 said,

You have to understand that the main problem here is the cost. the cost of windows in asian countries is one paycheck for many... lets be honest here will you pay ~$4000(paycheck) for windows.....
It's very rarely the cost. People build 2k...3K computers and stick a pirated OS on it that they could have payed $100 for OEM. The issue is people perceive non physical goods to have a lesser value than those that are physical. You see it all the time, people that complain music or software costs a ridiculous amount because "a CD/DVD costs only a few cents to press". People completly overlook what goes into producing something.


People also have some twisted sense of entitlement. They download something so they can "try" it even if they don't have permission to use it on a trial basis. That and the fact that things such as music and even something like Windows is a luxory item that no one really needs and if you need it for work the company would buy it for you. Music doesn't cost that much, people just want as much of it as they can have so it begins to get expensive ifter repeat purchases (that you dont need). Thather than saying one has enough they just download it so they can maintain their hobby/interest.

Edited by Smigit, May 12 2010, 8:05am :

Ohh and to add to what I just posted. If price was peoples only concern then people could wait 6 months for prices to drop. OS's and Productivity apps stay at a static price but for most things they decrement over time (movies, TV, games). However people don't wait, they want the product now and rather than wait they would rather steal it instead. It's not the price thats the cause for this but rather a mentality that people want what they can't have. You make the item cheaper and it'll probably still be too expensive or they will want two games or movies instead of one so they have to resort to pirating again.


Theres exceptions, but generally I don't think price is the decisive factor at all.

Edited by Smigit, May 12 2010, 8:52am :

Smigit said,
Ohh and to add to what I just posted. If price was peoples only concern then people could wait 6 months for prices to drop. OS's and Productivity apps stay at a static price but for most things they decrement over time (movies, TV, games). However people don't wait, they want the product now and rather than wait they would rather steal it instead. It's not the price thats the cause for this but rather a mentality that people want what they can't have. You make the item cheaper and it'll probably still be too expensive or they will want two games or movies instead of one so they have to resort to pirating again.


Theres exceptions, but generally I don't think price is the decisive factor at all.

******** prices haven't dropped that much here in NZ maybe 50 bucks since win 7 was released so it's still well overpriced and we never got any of the sweet deals other countries in the world got on pre order or party offers. as for games here i've seen 12mth old games still going for 90% of their release day cost

Read what I said again. I said OS's and Productivity software is relatively static but movies, games and audio cd's typically drop over time. The point is that despite the price drops for these other products people still elect to steal them on release rather than wait for the price to decrement.


From there you can probably guess that even if the OS was to drop in price at some point, people would still be likely to steal it. Clearly there is a lot more to do with it than just the price given many products DO get cheaper (and by a considerable amount). Besides...OEM prices are quite low for a piece of software most people will use daily for around two or three years.


As for games..yes there are a few that stay high (COD is a notorious one) but most do drop. Hell I occasionally import games from NZ.

Edited by Smigit, May 13 2010, 5:04am :