Police say teen who leaked Xbox One info not cooperating

Information about Microsoft's Xbox One leaked long before its formal announcement in May thanks to an Australian teen with access to its development kit. According to recent police filings, the teen, Dylan Wheeler, is now denying police access to his laptop.

The West Australian Police claim Wheeler, known by the nickname "Super DaE," refused to grant access to his laptop despite being served a data access order compelling him to do so. According to the filing, Wheeler initially told officers he would enter the password himself since it "required some forensic preparation prior to any access attempt." Police claim Wheeler then refused to input the password, saying the input method was "taking too long" and later claiming he forgot the password because he changes passwords "all the time."

Police also say Wheeler declined to even say what kind of characters make up the password, though the teen reportedly says the entire police filing is a lie. An article by Kotaku Australia, citing Wheeler's private Twitter account, says the teen claims no such encryption exists on the laptop.

Australian authorities and the FBI raided Wheeler's home in February after he attempted to sell an Xbox One development kit online. Microsoft denied any involvement in the raid, saying the company "did not initiate this FBI investigation with this individual" and that its private corporate network had not been compromised as Wheeler claimed. The teen said he was able to obtain Xbox One development kits by gaining access to the company's servers and creating a false account on the Xbox Developer Program website. 

Wheeler threatened to leak more information about the Xbox One prior to his arrest, though he never followed through with the claim.

Source: Kotaku Australia via Polygon | Images via Microsoft, Kotaku

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55 Comments

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Sadly, I think that's the part of the legitimate product name. Whenever I do inventory, the newest iPad always shows up as "iPad 10" with Retina Display", so it's not a stretch to think the same applies to other Apple products.

"Wheeler threatened to leak more information about the Xbox One prior to his arrest, though he never followed through with the claim."
Actually he's got something setup so that a large encrypted 1.7TB torrent he uploaded on the net will have the encryption key put on the net if he gets jailed or something, apparently.

n_K said,
"Wheeler threatened to leak more information about the Xbox One prior to his arrest, though he never followed through with the claim."
Actually he's got something setup so that a large encrypted 1.7TB torrent he uploaded on the net will have the encryption key put on the net if he gets jailed or something, apparently.

The device isnt out yet, let them release the key. MS can make a new one.

Kalint said,

The device isnt out yet, let them release the key. MS can make a new one.


Who says the timed key release isn't waiting until the XBO has been released?
He doesn't appear to be retarded.

Leaning on a kid for leaking Xbox One information. I bet there is someone who needs the police yet they waste time arresting a kid who leaked information that EVERYONE KNOWS NOW! They should let him go because in my eyes no crimes were committed. If anything Microsoft is to blame for not having adequate security measures in place.

i bet you also put the blame on rape victims

illage3 said,
Leaning on a kid for leaking Xbox One information. I bet there is someone who needs the police yet they waste time arresting a kid who leaked information that EVERYONE KNOWS NOW! They should let him go because in my eyes no crimes were committed. If anything Microsoft is to blame for not having adequate security measures in place.

How does this have anything to do with rape? They're completely different crimes and different situations. Hence why I said "I bet there is someone who needs the police". Police wasting time on trying to lock a kid up for what is essentially nothing.

If the kid raped someone then my opinions would be different.

her fault for not having security measures in place so the rape would not have happened...

illage3 said,
How does this have anything to do with rape? They're completely different crimes and different situations. Hence why I said "I bet there is someone who needs the police". Police wasting time on trying to lock a kid up for what is essentially nothing.

If the kid raped someone then my opinions would be different.

rippleman said,
think past the situation and explore the philosophy of it. This same method applies to everything. Shortsightedness is not an excuse.

Talk about short sighted. One of the worst possible examples you could use. Typical.

rippleman said,
think past the situation and explore the philosophy of it. This same method applies to everything.

I think that's the most idiotic thing I've ever read on the Internet. Congratulations!

Applying the same method to every situation, completely ignoring how situations are different - that isn't small time idiocy, that's big time, profound, monumental idiocy. Granted I've seen people do this, but I figured they were those people were just being lazy or ignorant - I never imagined I'd hear someone defending it as if it's some intellectually sound way of understanding the world.

If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to treat everything as if it were a nail. Ignoring context - the differences between situations - is nearly the dictionary definition of shortsightedness.

i disagree... sorry if it hurts your feelings..

kayan said,

I think that's the most idiotic thing I've ever read on the Internet. Congratulations!

Applying the same method to every situation, completely ignoring how situations are different - that isn't small time idiocy, that's big time, profound, monumental idiocy. Granted I've seen people do this, but I figured they were those people were just being lazy or ignorant - I never imagined I'd hear someone defending it as if it's some intellectually sound way of understanding the world.

If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to treat everything as if it were a nail. Ignoring context - the differences between situations - is nearly the dictionary definition of shortsightedness.

illage3 said,
Leaning on a kid for leaking Xbox One information. I bet there is someone who needs the police yet they waste time arresting a kid who leaked information that EVERYONE KNOWS NOW! They should let him go because in my eyes no crimes were committed. If anything Microsoft is to blame for not having adequate security measures in place.

He created an account and agreed to a disclaimer at the same time, so he did commit a crime no matter how you try to turn it around.

You break six laws just crossing the street. Pretty much everything is illegal. One of the weakest legal stances are "click to accept" devices. You can get as much justice as you can afford.

Mineria said,

He created an account and agreed to a disclaimer at the same time, so he did commit a crime no matter how you try to turn it around.

To the law he committed a crime but seeing how information has now been released by Microsoft I don't think it's right to lock him up as there were no damages done as far as I can tell.

He's clearly using Truecrypt, it has plausible deniability built in. If it were were a MS, or any other company's encryption, it would have a back door for LE to access. "Experts" might have a harder time with some of the encryption strategies available through TC.

AStaley said,
Isn't he also breaking the law by falling to give the police his password for decrypting the laptop?

"You have the right to remain silent"

Also you are not obligated to help your own prosecution.

Windows Password or online website? just swap the HD then the information will expose unless he use bit-locker to encrypt his HD. this article writer did not elaborate much about it and create a confusion whether or not which password he refuse to provide.

Master of Earth said,
Windows Password or online website? just swap the HD then the information will expose unless he use bit-locker to encrypt his HD. this article writer did not elaborate much about it and create a confusion whether or not which password he refuse to provide.

The police filing with the original context is included in the article. It's referred to as a laptop password in the article -- I don't think it's a stretch of the imagination to assume most people know what that is.

Next time actually READ the article. It clearly says MacBook.
If this piece of information was not available when the original article was posted, then disregard with apologies.

Ideas Man said,
Next time actually READ the article. It clearly says MacBook.
If this piece of information was not available when the original article was posted, then disregard with apologies.

The article hasn't been edited -- it was all there for the start. No biggie -- he probably just didn't see it

Good on him for following the basic laws of being online "Don't give your password to anybody". Just because the police require it to charge you, I wouldnt be doing it either.

Anarkii said,
Good on him for following the basic laws of being online "Don't give your password to anybody". Just because the police require it to charge you, I wouldnt be doing it either.

Interesting really, I wonder how they're going to go about this. In the UK as part of common law you don't have to give evidence that self-incriminates and you can remain silent if you chose to do so. I guess it'd be like not saying where you stashed the money or the location of a body.

Clearly all these officers have too much free time to pursue such a trivial case when there is so much real crime going on out there.

They have his machine, any form of encryption can be broken. Instead of a Mexican stand-off just hand the machine to some experts and stop wasting man power on it. These officers can then do some real work instead of wasting time with this kid.

Thief? He was able to gain access to MS (security?) server and create a "false" account that MS did not check.

He leaked the information, like so many others do on so many other hardware.

To me, the only stupid thing he did was to sell the DevKit. That's the alarm trigger.

Steve121178 said,
Clearly all these officers have too much free time to pursue such a trivial case when there is so much real crime going on out there.

Corporate espionage and trade-secrets are a serious issue...

Steve121178 said,
They have his machine, any form of encryption can be broken. Instead of a Mexican stand-off just hand the machine to some experts and stop wasting man power on it. These officers can then do some real work instead of wasting time with this kid.

um... no? Encryption would be largely pointless if it could be just "broken" by the police or whoever. The *only* way they could break into it would be a brute force password hack, which depending on the length of his password & the characters used (hense why they asked that) could take anything from a few hours to a few decades

TruckWEB said,
Thief? He was able to gain access to MS (security?) server and create a "false" account that MS did not check.

He leaked the information, like so many others do on so many other hardware.

To me, the only stupid thing he did was to sell the DevKit. That's the alarm trigger.

LOL...he broke into MS servers..i guess that's not theft...

Steve121178 said,
They have his machine, any form of encryption can be broken. Instead of a Mexican stand-off just hand the machine to some experts and stop wasting man power on it. These officers can then do some real work instead of wasting time with this kid.
This might be true given enough time. If he's used TrueCrypt with a 3-tier cascaded cipher on the volume. By the time they are able to crack all three ciphers, the statue of limitations may have passed since with a strong password it's going to take years if they can do it at all.

http://news.techworld.com/secu...rs-fail-to-crack-truecrypt/

Steve121178 said,
They have his machine, any form of encryption can be broken.

Not true. He's probably using AES 256-bit encryption, which is impossible to break in any practical sense. This is the standard encryption algorithm used by all government agencies to protect confidential information. It's also pre-installed on all Mac OS X computers.

Breaking an AES 256-bit encryption with brute force takes over 100 years of processing time with a super computer.

kayan said,

Not true. He's probably using AES 256-bit encryption, which is impossible to break in any practical sense. This is the standard encryption algorithm used by all government agencies to protect confidential information. It's also pre-installed on all Mac OS X computers.

Breaking an AES 256-bit encryption with brute force takes over 100 years of processing time with a super computer.

But but, we have quantum powered computers now!

They could hook it up the harddisk and the quantum computer can try all possible combinations simultaneously finding the password instantly ... of course, as long as no one checks the password..

DrCheese said,

um... no? Encryption would be largely pointless if it could be just "broken" by the police or whoever. The *only* way they could break into it would be a brute force password hack, which depending on the length of his password & the characters used (hense why they asked that) could take anything from a few hours to a few decades

Actually data encrypted with AES protected with a password greater than 9 characters takes more years than the universe has been in existence (seriously no joke) with current hardware.

To the original commenter about how the police can just easily decrypt, that is completely false. If done right encryption can be virtually impossible to break.

In theory, you're kind of right. A regular computer can really only test one possible encryption key at a time, but a quantum computer could test many encryption keys simultaneously by putting data in states of quantum superposition. But even the most sophisticated quantum computer today I think can only handle about 8 qubits and is extremely prone to error. They have a long way to go before being as practical as a regular computer is at any task.