Poll: Do you use Windows 8 picture password feature to login?

When Microsoft launched Windows 8, they made a big fuss about the picture password feature. This new way of logging in is based on creating a pattern of touch points that will serve as your password; simply put, touch the same spots each time on the picture to unlock your machine.

Considering that Windows 8 has been out in the market for a couple of years and that we now have all sorts of different touch enabled devices, we are curious if you use the picture password on your machines. After a asking the question on Twitter, it seems that, when the picture password is used, the likely scenario is that it is with a tablet and traditional PC users still prefer text password entry.

If you do use the picture password feature, let us know in the comments below when and where you use it. We will be curious to see if Neowin users adopted the alternative login method or have stuck to traditional text passwords.

Image Credit: Microsoft

Poll

Do you use a picture password to login?

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79 Comments

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Basically my passwords is the space bar like 7 times. Always make it look like I"m typing but really just hitting the space bar.

Nope... never used any text password, picture password or fingerprint scanner for any device! I like to live on the edge. I actually turned Touch ID off on my iPhone 5S.

Yes on my Surface RT, no on my desktop. I just find it quicker and more convenient on Surface when I'm using it as a tablet.

"I'm sorry, but your password must contain an uppercase letter, a number, a haiku, a gang sign, a hieroglyph and the blood of a virgin."

No, but only because I have a fingerprint scanner on my notebook. Think I used it during beta testing though.

On my desktop I still use normal password, but on my Surface tablet, I use the picture password.
Just so much easier than using typing on the onscreen keyboard, if you don't want to use just lower case chars.

Just make sure when using the feature to not be too obvious.
I mean, on a portrait, tipping on the eyes and drawing a circle around the head, then you might just as well don't use a password at all.

Windows picture password has been a very useful tool for me on my desktop computer for sharing my login password among the members of my family.

My Surface is on our domain so when I'm docked at work I use the typed password but when I'm on the move I use the picture password because it's easier.

No SmartCards SmartCards SmartCards. I set 64 char passwords for my windows accounts which I then save onto two ACOS 3 Smartcards (For backup) using SmartCache for convience I then use an IDPrime .Net card to do smartcard login

my laptops webcam software allows me to log in to both Windows and websites in Internet Explorer using facial recognition.

I also have a password associated with my Microsoft account if my camera can't see my properly, for instance when there is no light

There should be a third option for those that do not use a password at all. If you select no, people will assume that you use a regular password while there are many people, including myself, that do not use any password at home.

Gergel7077 said,
There should be a third option for those that do not use a password at all. If you select no, people will assume that you use a regular password while there are many people, including myself, that do not use any password at home.

Lol

Lord Method Man said,
It's a simple question: Do you use the picture login feature? No need whatsoever for a third option. No one cares if you have a password or not.

Apparently you care since you felt the need to reply. Re-read my previous post.

I use lenovo veriface. Works amazingly well. I tried using it against a few people, mostly family, and it only recognized me, and of course, my password is super humongous, so they couldn't guess it either. It's instant!

Edited by Obi-Wan Kenobi, Jul 12 2014, 11:22pm :

Nope. Not on any platform. Those can be spoofed pretty easily. I just use a good/secure password that I can periodically. Would be cool if there was a voice unlock/login.

Been using ye olde text passwords since the 70s. Haven't felt a need to change.

Just out of idle curiosity however.. how does that work for network authentication? Falls back to a regular password, picture's just for the local session?

The picture password only kicks in after you've logged on. If you're on a domain, you still have to type your network credentials, but after that if you lock the computer or put it to sleep, the picture password becomes an option.

You can't use the picture password to authenticate against domain/network resources.

Tablets only. Anything with a built in keyboard I use a pin which is probably worse. Wish they would make the pins longer than 4 digits like on WP.

I use a 4096 character password because the NSA could hack into my computer, but if I forget it, I can get it from my phone's email.

JoseyWales said,
I use biometrics..

on my old Toshiba I use too, it's the easiest and fastest way. Would be awesome if I could also turn notebook on with it and login at the same time.

Same here on my trusty old Lenovo X230 tablet. Just wish the touch screen was a bit more sensitive but it's a Windows 7-era computer.

There seems to be a misconception that keeps appearing with regard on use of biometrics.

A biometric is something you possess, not a password. You can't change your fingerprints out every 30 days like a password.

Multifactor authentication (something I am, something I know, something I possess) can be achieved using biometrics, but you still need a password to be secure.

burritodave said,
There seems to be a misconception that keeps appearing with regard on use of biometrics.

There really needs to be an effort to educate that biometrics would be a suitable user name replacement, but not a password replacement.

It uses the systems password and can be updated with it. I can also set it for as many websites as I like so I don't have to type in anything for them either.
Biometrics is a username/password saver for the most part. A finger print is not what logs you on but the stored password for the system or app/site you assign for it using the digital persona software.

I liked a lot the PIN feature. Although I haven't found a way to always appear after sleeping or hibernating :/

The main advantage is that you don't need to give your main p/w to a person wanting to use your pc.

Jose_49 said,
I liked a lot the PIN feature. Although I haven't found a way to always appear after sleeping or hibernating :/

The main advantage is that you don't need to give your main p/w to a person wanting to use your pc.


exactly, that's a main scenario where it should be used. for example I had local account added to domain at work and then attached personal credentials to it (to access store) and then set up a PIN to be used instead of text password to my personal account.