Progress made on cracking Blu-ray's special DRM, BD+

SlySoft, the Antigua-based company behind AndDVD HD, has claimed that it knows how to defeat the additional BD+ encryption available on Blu-ray devices, and that BD+ movies will be cracked by the end of the year. In a press release, the company appears to relish its outlaw status in Hollywood. "I should really think about hiring a bodyguard now, since this product won't please everybody," said James Wong, the company's head developer. He's certainly right about that.

AACS, the "advanced" copy protection system deployed on both high-def disc formats, proved itself to be something less than hacker proof when it was cracked in a couple of months. Back in April, hackers announced a set of "non-revocable cracks" and then promptly cracked AACS again a day after it was "fixed." BD+ is a second layer of encryption that can be slapped on top of AACS. It wasn't used with initial Blu-ray releases because, well, it wasn't actually done. The specs and licensing arrangements weren't worked out until June of this year, and it wasn't long after that BD+ went to work annoying legal users.

View: Full Story @ Ars Technica

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19 Comments

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ThePitt said,
seems like they are implementing some opensource code and adapting to they payed software. lame.

Don't spread fudd please. At the moment there is no open sourced or freeware programs out there which can do this. This is all the work of the very talented Slysoft people.

AACS, the "advanced" copy protection system deployed on both high-def disc formats, proved itself to be something less than hacker proof when it was cracked in a couple of months.

No, this is false. AACS was never cracked. But it was found out where certain HD-DVD playing applications X stored keys in memory.

That is nowhere near of an encryption method being cracked though.

The end result is similar though, until said keys become much better protected, or e.g. software players stop being made. Then the difference of an encryption method being cracked or not becomes much more clear.

Jugalator said,
No, this is false. AACS was never cracked. But it was found out where certain HD-DVD playing applications X stored keys in memory.

snip

Meh, crack, work-a-round, doesn't matter how they do it. Ends in the same result which is what we want

I wish these companies would just give it up and realise that the only people copy protection causes a problem for is the actual people who buy their stuff.

So they created a new copy protection, wich making a lot of existing BD players unable to read new BD+ disks... and it ends up being compeltely useless... well except for ****ing off their own users

Indeed. There is no copy protection software in the world that will not be cracked within a few weeks/months from its release. All that this futile attempt at stopping pirates succeeds in doing is to **** off the legal paying customers when they find the copy protection software is not fully compatible with their player.