Proteins Could Beef Up Your Computer's Memory

According to a Japanese researcher it looks like theres a possibility that within the next few years, protein could be playing an important role in the operation of your computer. The research is being done to try and show how proteins would eliminate magnetic interference that can wreak havoc on a computers hard drive.

Tetsuro Majima at Osaka University in Japan has now shown that proteins can be used to store computer data — and exceed the capacities of today's magnetic and optical media, which are pushing their performance boundaries. The resulting data should be stable enough for a commercial product, which he hopes to see emerge in the next five years, he told LiveScience.

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27 Comments

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Are we talking about enzymes here? The protein in question must not be very complex because I was under the assumption that predicting the tertiary structure of polypeptides is very very difficult.

i wonder how this stuff reacts to temperature changes and stuff though
and what happens if you overclock your proteins!

Sweet, I could use blood to exponentially increase the memory capacity of all my devices. Thank you to whoever discovered hemoglobin (a globular protein). :P

All in all, this is very interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if this becomes the norm in 10-20 years.

(tsupersonic said @ #11)
Funny how you people associate proteins with food. Proteins are everywhere ;)

"The protein (derived from bacteria) is stable"

(n_K said @ #11.1)

"The protein (derived from bacteria) is stable"
Gee thanks, but I read the article. I was referring to the comments on here...

The protein (derived from bacteria) is stable, but for long-term storage is best kept below 4 degrees Celsius (40 degrees Fahrenheit.)

The results are detailed in the latest edition of Langmuir, a scientific journal of the American Chemical Society covering films, gels, bio-electric-chemistry and related phenomena.

I don't think this will work. Pretty much when you think of protein you think of short term...not long term. And this protein is derived from bacteria (I assume they take it out of bacteria) which isn't really a cost effective method of mass produce.

(npe said @ #10)

I don't think this will work. Pretty much when you think of protein you think of short term...not long term. And this protein is derived from bacteria (I assume they take it out of bacteria) which isn't really a cost effective method of mass produce.


I lawled.

Bacteria is probably the most cost effective way to mass-manufacture substances.

(npe said @ #10)
I don't think this will work. Pretty much when you think of protein you think of short term...not long term. And this protein is derived from bacteria (I assume they take it out of bacteria) which isn't really a cost effective method of mass produce.

Well it is insulin is much better and cheaper if produced by bacteria than from animals

For making conventional proteins bacteria are cheap and effective factories because we can't really synthesize those compounds with current chemistry techniques. But that doesn't mean they can produce these compounds in huge quantity, and the reason why your drugs aren't exactly cheap.

What I was refering to is synthesis using biosystems (bateria, plants, animals) compare to synthesis using conventional chemistry techniques (what they currently use to make coupounds for coating your conventional hard drives). In short, if we have to rely on biosystems to make this compound I don't think it will work because these systems simply can't mass produce enough "proteins" for the hard drive market.

(npe said @ #10.3)
For making conventional proteins bacteria are cheap and effective factories because we can't really synthesize those compounds with current chemistry techniques. But that doesn't mean they can produce these compounds in huge quantity, and the reason why your drugs aren't exactly cheap.

What I was refering to is synthesis using biosystems (bateria, plants, animals) compare to synthesis using conventional chemistry techniques (what they currently use to make coupounds for coating your conventional hard drives). In short, if we have to rely on biosystems to make this compound I don't think it will work because these systems simply can't mass produce enough "proteins" for the hard drive market.


You're still wrong. Bacteria are good for cost-effective mass production.

Drugs are expensive because they want your money, not because it's expensive to make them.

er... Proteins? Isn't human hair made of proteins? Would it be susceptible to static electricity? hehehe.... don't rub it next to a balloon :P

They need to make a hard drive that is fiber optic based for the average consumer and storage needs to be along the lines of light impulses that store data in photosensitive cells or crystals or something... yeah... I'd dig a crystal hard drive.

(Digix said @ #9.1)
Crystal/diamond would cost and weigh an arm and a leg.

Man, that's one f***ed up store you're going to. :ponder:

(BigCheese said @ #7.1)
And by the way, the new Bionic Woman series has been cancelled.

The first couple of episodes were ok but everything after it sucked just like the new terminator series, tv really sucks anymore, can't wait til the new battlestar galactica season gets here, it's one of the few series' on tv worth watching.

(Echilon said @ #4)
Having just lost 200Gb to a failed HD, more reliable storage would certainly be favourable.

Conventional proteins denature at high temperatures, so if this happens and the proteins are not heat-stable, you will have less reliable storage.

what do "animal rights people" have to do with proteins and why would they oppose such a PC?!?! seems like you have no idea what you are talking about.

(gaburko said @ #2)
what do "animal rights people" have to do with proteins and why would they oppose such a PC?!?! seems like you have no idea what you are talking about.

He's worried they'll free the invisible magic hamster that lives in his PSU and powers his PC.

but don't worry, animal rights people will come along with some 'oh I can`t possibly buy this pc!' rubbish