PSA: Registration for Microsoft's BUILD 2014 conference starts at noon ET

As we first reported in December, Microsoft will begin the registration process for its BUILD 2014 developer conference today, with the event itself to be held at the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco on April 2-4.

The BUILD 2014 website states that the site will open for sign ups to the conference at noon Eastern Time (9 am Pacific time). The price for a ticket is $2095 for qualified developers. There's no word if Microsoft will offer a discount for students this time, as they have for previous BUILD events. While the cost for entry is high, the conference usually sells out rather quickly. Microsoft also tends to give out free hardware to attendees like Surface tablets and Windows Phone handsets during the event.

BUILD 2014 is likely to be a very newsworthy event, as recent rumors claim that Microsoft will use the conference to officially announce their plans to revamp the main Windows platform with their Threshold update, which may officially be named as Windows 9. More information on Windows Phone 8.1 is also expected to be revealed during BUILD 2014, and we may get a bigger demo of Microsoft's plans to offer a Modern UI-based Office suite at the event.

Update: Registration is now open and the site has revealed that there will be an academic discount which reduces the price down to $995.

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14 Comments

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acido00 said,
The price is what makes me a little noise.. I wish I could pay to go there.

the amount of freebies you get make the actual cost about half that. but then if you add hotels and flight it can get crazy expensive. I still don't get why MSFT can't hold an east side conference every other year so that we east coasters don't get scroogled all the time flying cross country.

To be honest, windows 8/8.1 is a great OS and critics has been far too dopey to adapt it.

Everyone gonna upgrade to windows 9 because this is almost the pattern of every newest windows release tick=Disaster tock=Magic

Master of Earth said,
To be honest, windows 8/8.1 is a great OS and critics has been far too dopey to adapt it.

Everyone gonna upgrade to windows 9 because this is almost the pattern of every newest windows release tick=Disaster tock=Magic


I feel the same. I have had no issues at all using windows 8. I just look at the new start screen as a bigger and easier-to-customize start menu. Other than that, it's really just windows 7, which is cool.

And the good thing is it will be just like an advanced version of windows 8 just with a massive change in hardware as well because the other hardware by than is like 6-10 years old still running win7.

The hyper-majority of the angst around Windows 8/8.1 revolves around its lack of a Start menu - however, that very lack is vehemently denied by those same critics as the biggest reason why. I don't what I can say to the Residents of the Royal Barge to get them to look at their own reasoning objectively - I (and other non-touch-supported) have tried to point out that desktop applications don't even CARE that the Start menu is gone; they still stick their fingers in their ears and gripe about the lack of a Start menu.

-adrian- said,
And the good thing is it will be just like an advanced version of windows 8 just with a massive change in hardware as well because the other hardware by than is like 6-10 years old still running win7.

yup, but at the same time, i want them to overhaul the desktop experience as well. updated icons would be a nice start to fit that overall metro look.

I don't know. The last time I had icons on my Desktop must have been around Vista times. Don't know why I would want desktop icons. Would need to minimize everything just to open something and the rest again

I've gone to every one. I hate doing conferences in San Fran. I end up not wanting to be at the conference.

I don't understand why they do these in big cities. If they want hard core developers who actually care about their products. They need something where there is nothing else to do. I'd do a retreat in the mountains of Washington.

I don't really feel like spending 2k (for a few toys) and not be that interested in the sessions. Mostly because they are available online anyways and there is a ton of things to do! I ended up enjoying Napa and having fun.

Sadly, I am skipping this year. I have enjoyed a lot of PDC's and BUILD's in the past.

ThreadAbort said,
I've gone to every one. I hate doing conferences in San Fran. I end up not wanting to be at the conference.

I don't understand why they do these in big cities. If they want hard core developers who actually care about their products. They need something where there is nothing else to do. I'd do a retreat in the mountains of Washington.

I don't really feel like spending 2k (for a few toys) and not be that interested in the sessions. Mostly because they are available online anyways and there is a ton of things to do! I ended up enjoying Napa and having fun.

Sadly, I am skipping this year. I have enjoyed a lot of PDC's and BUILD's in the past.

my feelings exactly. I always regret missing one but the value I get out of it is not worth the cost since I end up just watching the online sessions anyway.

I think it is the atmosphere I miss the most.

Today's "Times" has a no-holds-barred description (accurate?) of what to expect:
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/...chnology/article3974439.ece

"Microsoft plans to cut its losses on Windows 8, the latest version of the software that runs the majority of the world's computers, jettisoning the brand in an attempt to appease millions of disgruntled users.

Industry sources believe that the world's biggest software company will announce a new operating system, codenamed “Threshold”, at an event in April. "