Public can purchase $100 laptop

The backers of the One Laptop Per Child project plan to release the machine on general sale next year.
But customers will have to buy two laptops at once - with the second going to the developing world. Five million of the laptops will be delivered to developing nations this summer, in one of the most ambitious educational exercises ever undertaken.

Michalis Bletsas, chief connectivity officer for the project, said they were working with eBay to sell the machine. "If we started selling the laptop now, we would do very good business," Mr Bletsas, speaking at the Consumer Electronics Show, told BBC News. "But our focus right now is on the launch in the developing world."

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That's really ignorant. Most Africans are not starving, they are just very poor. When there is a drought clearly they need emergency food etc., but history has shown time and time again that the best way to help people is to give them opportunities, not handouts (apart from emergencies).

There was a report just yesterday on Newsnight (BBC2, UK) into how mobile phones are changing peoples lives for the better in Africa, even a Maasai tribe had a mobile phone (charged with solar power)!

Although I agree that food/water > laptop, there are already charities that serve that purpose that you can donate away to.

The purpose of this charity is to increase the education standards of these people. You can feed them all you want, when they are out of food they will be asking for more. This program, however, will get more of these kids into colleges and onto a better life.

You know the saying:
Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime.

People living in the third world don't give a damn about laptops, how would they recharge them? They'd need to use electricity, something which to them is very expensive. Even when they do get the laptops what are they going to do with them? Play Solitaire?! They don't need them!!!

As someone else said, just let some money go to charity to build wells or buy a goat.

To my knowledge, they aren't going to really poverty-stricken countries but countries still developing that aren't dirt poor but still wouldn't be able to pay for fully priced laptops for kids. Aren't Libya and Brazil part of this scheme?

And the nigerian email scams will increase 10x fold!


More likely situation

Son: I need medicine and food

Dad: Well google it, then you can see what you will never have becuase our country is over run by druglords and we cant do anything about it

You know peoples, not all undeveloped countries are suffering from drought, famine etc. Yes food, shelter and healthcare are issues for 3rd world countries. (as they are issues for here in the US too) However, those with the basics can use technology to learn, to grow in many ways.

Think bigger. Realize that while food is important, it is only a start.

"Yes, because they don't need food to live, they eat air."

Did you consider that plenty of Africans are not starving, they are just poor, and hence a cheap laptop (= eduction etc.) is a very good idea.

winmoose said,
"Yes, because they don't need food to live, they eat air."

Did you consider that plenty of Africans are not starving, they are just poor, and hence a cheap laptop (= eduction etc.) is a very good idea.

Of course I realise that but unfortunately more need food water and medicine etc. than a computer. A blackboard and chalk could teach 10 ten the amount of children for a tenth of the cost.

A computer connected to the internet (yes they do have the internet, even 3G mobile phones in much of the populated areas of Africa) has access to unlimited amounts of educational material, *MUCH* more useful than a piece of chalk.

winmoose said,
A computer connected to the internet (yes they do have the internet, even 3G mobile phones in much of the populated areas of Africa) has access to unlimited amounts of educational material, *MUCH* more useful than a piece of chalk.

Yes, which is good, but if only 1 person has access to it, then that is a small problem don't you think?

Yes, which is good, but if only 1 person has access to it, then that is a small problem don't you think?

That's why these are cheap, so they can be given to many people. Plus, a single laptop could be used by a whole family.

We've been giving them food for a long time. We need to do something else obviously so they can accomplish more for themselves and learn how to make something better for themselves.

Edit: That was supposed to reply to 12.1. Sorry.

how can we prove the second laptop is actually going to a developing country to someone who needs it and not going to someone who doesnt or even if it actually is even going there!... With all these UN scandles and stuff happining kind of dont trust things just going in blind sight somewhere else

<sarcasm>
Exactly! How do we know there isn't some sort of food or medicine scam going on? Let's stop giving food, water and medicine to these countries in need, too!
</sarcasm>

No one is saying that there won't be problems. No one is saying to stop food and medicine shipments and replace them with boxes of laptops. These are an optional supplement that countries in need can purchase for education at a reduced cost.

And somehow this is all bad?

markjensen said,
<sarcasm>
Exactly! How do we know there isn't some sort of food or medicine scam going on? Let's stop giving food, water and medicine to these countries in need, too!
</sarcasm>

No one is saying that there won't be problems. No one is saying to stop food and medicine shipments and replace them with boxes of laptops. These are an optional supplement that countries in need can purchase for education at a reduced cost.

And somehow this is all bad?

who said that was bad? I said I just want to make sure it gets where it is said to be going, whats so wrong with that?

Sorry. Most of my post was a general comment. I certainly never quoted you in a way to rebut any specific points you made.

Your post happened to be the last one in the list and conveyed the tone I was posting in regards to. More of a convenient place to tack a counterpoint, rather than specific to your post.

You buy one laptop, and the other goes to some child in developing country with whom you can then flirt in a chatroom

Kids gets laptop, downloads photoshop, learns photoshop becoming a professional at it, makes sig/banner/logo's on neowin for money, and uses the money to order stuff off ebay

What bothers me a lot is that people are hungry for $100 laptops but hesitate if they have to buy one for someone else that could use the resources. That's still $200 for a laptop.

Someone mentioned how a blackboard and chalk would be better. How? You can educate yourself using the internet. You need a person who already knows their stuff to teach it using a blackboard and chalk.

You know what a major problem is in Africa right now? AIDS. If people became educated on HIV, that would stop the spreading of it tremendously. As it is now there's tons of myths in Africa on how to cure AIDS, none of which work and usually only lead to more people getting it.

To the person above complaining about how we're helping everyone else before ourselves, here's an idea. Want to get laptops for your own charity organization? Buy four of them, two for you and two for them.

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