Pulse pulls Windows Phone app from download store

Earlier today, Microsoft hyped up the launch of the HTML5 web-based application for Pulse, the popular news aggregation app. Microsoft said that the Pulse team worked with its Internet Explorer team to make sure the web-based version works well on Internet Explorer 10 on the Windows 8 platform.

However, it looks like the launch of the web-based Pulse app has also resulted in the native Windows Phone app being discontinued. WPCentral.com noticed that the download link for the previously released Pulse Windows Phone port is no longer available from the Windows Phone Store.

The web site contacted Pulse and received this response:

We have been prioritizing web and updating iOS and Android platforms and will look at the Windows phone in the near future. In the meantime, can we persuade you to check out the web app on a desktop platform.

While not a flat out confirmation, the wording of the statement makes it clear that the Pulse team is putting more efforts on its new HTML5-based web application and has decided that was more important than updating or even offering its Windows Phone application to smartphone owners.

Pulse for Windows Phone was first launched in September 2011, just a couple of months before Windows Phone 7.5 was made available to the public.

Source: WPCentral.com

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IMO this is a major flaw in the processing of our devolopers. If Star trek has thought us anything it's that regardless of the size of your ship "**** happens" and your tricorder must able to function on it's own. For example it took me three tries to get neowin.net to allow me to write this... Once during log-in it takes me to a unrelated page, next W8RP IE10 Desktop locks up have three words (runs 25% CPUS, end task) and third I hope I get this finished before it does something else.
We need smart devices that run regardless of the cloud. We saw over the last few weeks Amazon, MS and others not only or offline for stupid reasons but also hacks of entire companies and networks. MS going to skydrive, sharepoint, MS ID and moving away from on-site servers makes this worse.
I love the cloud and my onsite servers. Some places one is better than other but they are both needed.
I started in the BBS, dumb terminal days and still remember when everything was busy, down, offline or broken. So even if we wanted too Star treks shown us we'll always have a distance/speed/time issue.

Well, honestly, a mobile site with HTML5 ought be preferable to an app anyhow. You can update as you like/need, no need for an approval process, no worries about getting censored, you can support far more platforms/devices, etc.

Steve Jobs originally believed that there was no need for apps on the iPhone because of the web and web apps. While that's still wrong, there's certainly an element of truth to it - there are classes of apps that would be better off as web-apps rather than having to fuss with multiple native versions.

Maybe, via HTML5, we'll see Phone Story on the iPhone and iPad, with a big middle finger to Apple ^_^

Sam not Spam said,
Well, honestly, a mobile site with HTML5 ought be preferable to an app anyhow. You can update as you like/need, no need for an approval process, no worries about getting censored, you can support far more platforms/devices, etc.

Steve Jobs originally believed that there was no need for apps on the iPhone because of the web and web apps. While that's still wrong, there's certainly an element of truth to it - there are classes of apps that would be better off as web-apps rather than having to fuss with multiple native versions.

Maybe, via HTML5, we'll see Phone Story on the iPhone and iPad, with a big middle finger to Apple ^_^

+1

This is the point, and what Microsoft and others that are 'truly' shoving the HTML5 specification and not just giving it lip service and then throwing in garbage like WebGL to do graphics, as Apple, Google, and others are doing.

The RIA concepts of HTML5 make the Web App experience quite close to native application performance, and with IE9 and IE10's accelerated architecture that treats web content like 'code' and 'runs' the content rather than 'displays' the content, this has been proven that the Web can go back to be the Web and we don't need 500 Apps just to replace websites.

With Windows 8, WinRT is using the IE10 engine as a part of the platform, so that it allows HTML5 code to run via WinRT as 'native' applications, but is essentially just running the code through IE10 as any WebSite could do.

Back when people were complaining about there NOT being a Pandora App for WP7, people were missing the bigger picture even then.

Pandora runs great on WP7 as a WebSite using HTML5. WP7 recognizes the site and audio stream and even integrates it into the Media Player and keeps the site streaming when IE9 is no longer active on WP7.

The problem is that the Pandora HTML5 website experience is NOT possible on Android or iOS (last time I tried), as Android does not 'get' that the site is streaming Audio properly and when you go to another App or the home screen, the website is 'suspended'.

There are a lot of great HTML5 sites out there that DO NOT need dedicated platform Apps, and all they need is a Browser Shortcut and can have local App like experiences on devices and computers.

People should open Pandora now on your PC using IE9, this is what the WP7 users get, and it stays active and it works wonderfully, and it even can be paused, etc from the integrated media controls of the phone.

The only thing Web Sites need to advance on is 'flow' and instead of offering a mobile version of the site, have the Site be smart enough to 'flow' to the screen layout and size. Which are technologies Microsoft has been trying to get designers to use for over 8 years, as even the WPF concepts in Vista are about flowing content, and were from some of their older HTML work that was rejected back in the 90s due to the politics that is NOW a part of CSS and HTML5.

Omen1393 said,
No loss here, Weave is soo much faster, and more functional than Pulse.

Hrmm good call, just tried this and have to agree, liking it better than the Pulse app.