Remember Y2K? Well, are you prepared for the DST bug?

A few years ago people were purchasing generators, stocking up on food and preparing for the worst. When it was said and done, Y2K came and went with relatively little fuss considering the attention it was given.

Now we here at Neowin are not saying that you need to get your generator out of storage but the DST date change does present a somewhat similar situation. Those that work in the IT departments of mission critical real-time databases may want to make sure they are prepared. The Information Technology Association of America cautioned this week that "Organizations could face significant losses if they are not prepared."

For everyone else, it is just an excuse to show up late for work. If you do have a lunch date with that blonde from Marketing, make sure you synchronize watches at some point during the morning.

It is possible that all of your lunch dates (or any other appointments for that matter) between March 11th and April 1st could be suspect since the DST change may affect users of calendar software. Microsoft Outlook calendar addicts should consider downloading Microsoft's "tzmove" utility to address time zone changes.

Just don't say that Neowin didn't warn you.

Download: tzmove time zone utility
News source: The Globe and Mail

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mufdvr3669 said,
This is from a Canadian newspaper. Thinks for the now regular anti-America post. Next upon, reading and comprehension.

Uh, you do realize that everyone has to change DST BECAUSE of the Americans. They should have just left the damn thing alone.

The company I work for has 42 systems (not computers... separate systems) that have to be patched before the new DST date. Many systems have no way to update (ie Windows update, which by the way is disabled on many corporate machines) and unless you want to manually update the time henceforth, you better patch and test. The new time change can wreak havoc on an unpatched SQL system.

Some Neowinians need to open their eyes to the real world and see that IT extends beyond the little PC and the Windows server world.

Think of this. No matter where you live YOUR credit card company, bank, broker etc. probably has some of servers in the US. Your data could get screwed or your CC double charged who knows what else. It's not just about your home clock folks. Time precision is extremely important.

HAHAHA, cant believe how silly this thread is. y2K is nothing like DST. COmputers and companies have always been fine here in the uk! clocks go back at 2am here, normally.

whats all this fuss about? do you Americans not use DST?

Logie, DST means you put the clocks forward an hour in the spring, and back an hour in the winter. thus maximising the "daylight" we get when awake.

rageagainstmachine said,
Logie, DST means you put the clocks forward an hour in the spring, and back an hour in the winter. thus maximising the "daylight" we get when awake.

Which is great, because then we use less lights and thus less energy.

whats all this fuss about? do you Americans not use DST?

Go back and read Fred Derf's post (4.1) for the explanation about the changes that were made for this year.

Thanks, George Bush for sending our country further into the abyss.

On August 8, 2005, President George W. Bush signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005. This Act changed the time change dates for Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. Beginning in 2007, DST will begin on the second Sunday in March and end the first Sunday in November. The Secretary of Energy will report the impact of this change to Congress. Congress retains the right to resume the 2005 Daylight Saving Time schedule once the Department of Energy study is complete.

Anyone knows if Microsoft will be releasing (or already did release) a fix for their operating system clocks for this before it hits?

Oh noes. I will be late for my appointments!1!1!1

I love how people are saying this is going to mess everyone up. If IT departments were smart, they would have implemented this change as soon as they could. Where I am we just finished rolling out the patches and fixes for every application. Sure it requires planning and deployment, but anyone who works in IT should know that things like this should be done sooner rather than later.

The company I work for has 42 systems (not computers... separate systems) that have to be patched before the new DST date. Many systems have no way to update (ie Windows update, which by the way is disabled on many corporate machines) and unless you want to manually update the time henceforth, you better patch and test. The new time change can wreak havoc on an unpatched SQL system.

Some Neowinians need to open their eyes to the real world and see that IT extends beyond the little PC and the Windows server world.

/signed

Everyone is cracking jokes about this, but they should try looking at the bigger picture, and not just consider their Windows box sitting at home and the IT admins managing a few servers.

Try thinking about the impact this has, for example, on the systems running the stock exchange. This wouldn't just be an outlook entry that is misplaced. Testing and implementing this fix also takes it's time. It's not just the matter of running windows update et voila. Every single system has to be thouroughly tested to make sure nothing goes wrong. Sure, this is easy to do with a few servers, now try this on a few hundred, interoperating with one another and dozens of third-party companies...

Why not create a 0-day patch strategy for all of those systems? In the short term it seems like a waste of time, but there are going to be events like this happening every so often, so a patch plan / implementation strategy for every system can be a good idea. I'm not saying it would be easy, because it won't - but readiness is the key.

A 0-day strategy would be very difficult to implement. One thing is to install a patch, another thing is a problem where the time turns back. Imagine the schedulers running on a time schedule, when the time would suddenly turn back. They'd start over again and re-run jobs already/currently running. This would overwrite/append duplicate data, crash/abort jobs currently running. All this has fatal consequences. Imagine all the log files with the incorrect/duplicate timestamps.
Granted, the normal user wouldn't notice a difference if the clock on his PC were wrong. But all the processes running on the servers and dependant on time would.
A normal patch wouldn't be a problem. It would be tested and once approved, implemented. Though this takes weeks and sometimes months. Of course, the more critical a patch, the faster all this would go (still talking about weeks though).

the real problem with this DST issue is with Outlook and Exchange servers (scheduled meetings, resources, etc) and mobile devices, such as Blackberrys - it's already wreaking havoc at my company

there will need to be firmware upgrades for most of the mobile devices affected as well before those patches can be applied

never a dull moment...

What's up with all the "Omg, if my system doesn't auto-update the hour, I'll always be late" thing? How about changing the clock yourself?

I don't think anyone actually knows when DST is, it's something you hear a few days before it does... Sure, it's always some saturday but...

God, can *anyone* turn this into a bigger deal then America? :confused:

the whole concept of daylight savings is incredibly retarded and pointless and but moving it even more forward/back every single year is even more retarded and pointless.

WHO THE F*** CAME UP WITH THIS????!!!

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