Report: Sony managed to defeat new Playstation cyber attack

Late on Thursday, CNet reported via unnamed sources that online hackers were preparing to launch a new cyber attack on Sony's Playstation Network servers. Today, CNet has an update on that original story claiming, again via unnamed sources, that Sony managed to defeat the cyber attack that was planned to launch this past weekend.

In fact CNet is patting itself on the back a bit, claiming that "our publication of the group's plan may have caused Sony to secure the remaining servers this group claims it had access to, shutting off any avenues for another attack." It used Internet Relay Chat logs as proof, reporting that one of the alleged hackers wrote on IRC, "Apparently Sony saw that article because the last server that I could access is offline now...its probbaly (sic) being patched like the other servers. There goes our window."

Sony's Playstation Network has been down since April 20 after a cyber attack on the network's servers was found to have exposed the personal info from tens of millions of the network's users. The attack also affected the MMO servers from Sony Online Entertainment which have been shut down for a week now. There's still no word on when either network will come back online but Sony has promised to give the affected customers free fraud protection and free content once the servers come back online. Earlier today a Bloomberg story said that Sony was planning to fully restore the service by May 31. However VentureBeat now reports that story was in error and that Sony made no such statement.

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29 Comments

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Thats the equivalent of switching off the lights so the murder can't see you. Once its back on your in the plain sight again! But I think the chat logs meant that now that they've patched said server their window in is gone. About time. But i'd half imagine its just a PR stunt to reassure users. And it'll work and everyone will love sony again.

So obviously, the news article is pointing out another major Sony flaw of incompetence that tells us that Sony doesn't maintain their server farm with enough thought to fuel energy to move a flea's leg. Seriously, it shows us that they do not maintain servers if they have to 'patch' so many of them. Maintenance for your servers would be a wise thing, Sony. Even the smallest IT resources keep their server security up to date. You can't even do that.

Amodin said,
So obviously, the news article is pointing out another major Sony flaw of incompetence that tells us that Sony doesn't maintain their server farm with enough thought to fuel energy to move a flea's leg. Seriously, it shows us that they do not maintain servers if they have to 'patch' so many of them. Maintenance for your servers would be a wise thing, Sony. Even the smallest IT resources keep their server security up to date. You can't even do that.

And even those IT resources get hacked, so don't say garbage.

stablemist said,

And even those IT resources get hacked, so don't say garbage.

stablemist said,

And even those IT resources get hacked, so don't say garbage.

Agreed.

Its exactly like 'any' product. Ok so you know how they have the browser hack competitions every year now right? And every year, new exploits are found. Almost 90% of software can be hacked, look at the kinect, hacked the week it was out to work on PC, completely different categories too (xbox vs windows).

iPhones, Android, games, etc., almost everything can be hacked if 'someone' out there wants to go around. Thing with networks: you usually have to pay large sums of money to security firms who are really 'still' smaller than the world looking at it. That is usually why the whole 'open-source' idea is so loved, for some. The iPhone you cannot change every tiny aspect of it visually, how it operates, add any new feature...my point: Its closed-source. Its to the paid developers to design and add features. There is a team of what, maybe 100 people working on the iOS source all the time? (huge guess - just using basic #s) Where with android, you can have the world (6bil people) doing stuff with it.

I could go on. My point is, its very hard. The BETTER move would be instead of bumping up security (that has a possibility failing anyway no matter the $$), JUST DONT HOLD PEOPLES INFORMATION!!!!! WTF would they have all that for? This world is soooooo dependent on "oh, its asking me to store my CC to use it for later use......good idea "....riiight, are you dumb? You lose.

Just dont give any company 'online' your info to 'store'. Use it sure, but never store it (if it does it unknowingly then I'd sue). Simple as that people.

A big part of me thinks this story is complete bull, to get people to think they're capable of doing it, and try and scrabble some trust back from customers.

Benjy91 said,
A big part of me thinks this story is complete bull, to get people to think they're capable of doing it, and try and scrabble some trust back from customers.

yes, im feeling so much more confident in them now.

The way I read this was that Sony patched the venerability in all but one server which was then shut down for the patches received by the other servers. But maybe my comprehension skills are lacking today.

ermax said,
The way I read this was that Sony patched the venerability in all but one server which was then shut down for the patches received by the other servers. But maybe my comprehension skills are lacking today.

nah you're probably just the only person to actually read the article.

Well, 1st step in securing is always to prevent it to happen in the first place but once it happens the most important is damage control, which pretty much is pulling the plug out, that part Sony did well unfortunately for such huge company it is noticeable and bit tough for all customers

Yep sony defeated the hackers by pulling the plug on everything!!!


Sony are one step ahead of hackers, they have the best security in the business, just turn off everything and no one can hack it.

I really think this is a publicity stunt at this point. What has been stolen is already done and gone, the damage is done. What *good* hacker group would bother with them now? Script kiddies, that's who.

Hercules said,
I really think this is a publicity stunt at this point. What has been stolen is already done and gone, the damage is done. What *good* hacker group would bother with them now? Script kiddies, that's who.
I think you're right.

In the end whats really important is that future attacks like this can be prevented to keep users info secure and services running...

Hercules said,
I really think this is a publicity stunt at this point. What has been stolen is already done and gone, the damage is done. What *good* hacker group would bother with them now? Script kiddies, that's who.

if the servers get back online the stolen information can be used to access PSN user accounts and change passwords, delete them all together, make purchases... all sorts of goodies. also they need to make sure it doesn't happen again.

nub said,
Hooray, you're not COMPLETELY incompetent.

If and only if someone warns them of an impending attack well beforehand...ahem.

what? because they shut off the last server(s) allowing access to their infrastructure? That's not really defeating a cyber attack - more like rolling over and dying a month late.

Soulsiphon said,
what? because they shut off the last server(s) allowing access to their infrastructure? That's not really defeating a cyber attack - more like rolling over and dying a month late.

Soulsiphon said,
what? because they shut off the last server(s) allowing access to their infrastructure? That's not really defeating a cyber attack - more like rolling over and dying a month late.

Whoops srry about the mistake above.

Edit: never mind. It appears that some stuff in the cnet article is omitted here. Sorry.

Edited by Poom, May 9 2011, 9:01pm :

Shutting them off is no solution. I'm more interested to see them back online and connected to the world. Then they'll finally get some good testing done, and it's not like it would bother them just yanking the plugs again if they found another hole.

PS - Just read somewhere else that someone said PSN would definitely be up by May 31??? I'll try and track it down.