Report: Windows 8 beats Windows 7 in most performance tests

While there is a lot of debate about the Metro user interface that Microsoft has created for Windows 8, it seems that in terms of sheer performance, the new version of the Windows OS is better overall than the current version, Windows 7.

That's the conclusion of a new report on PCWorld.com. Its PCWorld Labs division recently ran a number of tests on the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. It included a test using its own proprietary benchmark software WorldBench 7.

Both Windows 8 and Windows 7 were installed on a PC with the same hardware specifications. It included an 3.3 GHz Intel Core i5-2500K processor with 8 GB of DDR3 RAM, a 1 TB hard drive, and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 560 Ti graphics card.

The WorldBench 7 benchmark results showed that the Windows 8 Consumer Preview was 14 percent faster than Windows 7. Other tests such as startup time, web performance and content creation all showed the pre-release version of Windows 8 performing better than Windows 7.

One test, the office productivity benchmark, did show Windows 7 beating Windows 8 Consumer Preview by eight percent. The article notes that Microsoft likely will improve performance in upcoming pre-release versions of Windows 8 before it is officially launched later this year.

Image via PCWorld

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Amazing scale. ot bias at all.

Anyway, it doesn't matter how you look at it, it shows Win 8 being faster, which in my eyes, means you can work nice and fast, until you realise you need to re-learn how to do something that you knew how to do in Win 7.

That's where Win 8 is going to waste my time. ****ing MEtro ****.

Interesting to note...Win-8 beats Win-7 in non office productivity tasks, typically the uses for smartphones and tablets; while Win-7 beats Win-8 in office productivity, typically the uses for laptops and desktops. Just confirms MS's seemingly ignoring office and serious home PC users.

the question should be, what's difference between W7 SP2 (all SP2 fixes applies) and W8 DP

as W8 contains these fixes and W7 SP1 not yet

I'm sick of the "you're holding it wrong" Steve Jobs like remarks when it comes to discussing anything metro. Fix up the mess that is metro then brag about 14% performance gains.

scratch42069 said,
I'm sick of the "you're holding it wrong" Steve Jobs like remarks when it comes to discussing anything metro. Fix up the mess that is metro then brag about 14% performance gains.

Eh??

scratch42069 said,
.....

Do you think if Microsoft designed in a bubble like Apple do, showing it off three weeks ahead of device availability, that everyone would think it was just as innovative as an Apple product?

On the other hand, Microsoft open their mouths and doors and oh, Windows.... inviting feedback and gathering gigabytes of metrics from those of us to step into this brave new world. I'm a part of the conversation, as I feel as though I'm doing my part in bringing Windows8 to the world.

Windows 8 Performance wise should be good but cannot get over Metro therefore no ugprade here. However i am very interested in seeing Windows 7 Service Pack 2.

Speaking of numbers up there, i have Raid 0 SSD setup and performance wise beats that graph by big margin and i run Windows 7. Having said that, i wouldn't go into these marketing graphs too much.

techguy77 said,
Windows 8 Performance wise should be good but cannot get over Metro therefore no ugprade here. However i am very interested in seeing Windows 7 Service Pack 2.

Speaking of numbers up there, i have Raid 0 SSD setup and performance wise beats that graph by big margin and i run Windows 7. Having said that, i wouldn't go into these marketing graphs too much.

Forgive me, but aren't IT folk supposed to be an adaptable species? Anyone who cannot adapt / "get over" things are in the wrong game and need to go play elsewhere.

In my IT company, those who cannot adapt / learn new technologies are not long term serving employees lol!!!

techguy77 said,
>snip<

Speaking of numbers up there, i have Raid 0 SSD setup and performance wise beats that graph by big margin and i run Windows 7. Having said that, i wouldn't go into these marketing graphs too much.


Benchmark your system on 7 and 8 with their test and report back.
After that, your opinion may carry merit.

WP7 said,

Forgive me, but aren't IT folk supposed to be an adaptable species? Anyone who cannot adapt / "get over" things are in the wrong game and need to go play elsewhere.

In my IT company, those who cannot adapt / learn new technologies are not long term serving employees lol!!!

I am Computer Programmer working on 4 different languages and also developing Desktop and Web applications for .NET platform. I could care less about adaption to OS. For me Metro is obstacle, like i care about Metro Apps? Only if i get myself in position to develop some otherwise for my personal computer at home where i do gaming and also programming don't want to see it.

My first computer was Spectrum ZX and i am doing programming since. I have developed apps in so many environments doing web based UI, desktop UI, UI for Mainframe apps (using Cobol and Natural programming language) and i have never seen such a failure UI wise as Windows 8. Honestly i cannot believe that MS did this, still have hard time grasping it.

Regression_88 said,

Benchmark your system on 7 and 8 with their test and report back.
After that, your opinion may carry merit.

Really don't have time for that type of BS.

Haha so many Metro whiners. I've been using 8 on my tablet and Desktop for over 2 weeks and I never use Metro on my Desktop other than as a start menu. It works great!

-=SEDIN=- said,
People on neowin are losing their sleep over metro.

Because many of them know they will be losing tons of sleep when Microsoft rams this down the throats of the users, customers, and family members who won't understand a GUI paradigm that relies on INVISIBLE widgets and keyboard shortcuts to navigate.

Metro = the way forward. Those who think otherwise can enjoy their antiquated xp/win7 & leave the rest of us to enjoy the extra performance / more usable UI that Metro gives :-)

WP7 said,
Metro = the way forward. Those who think otherwise can enjoy their antiquated xp/win7 & leave the rest of us to enjoy the extra performance / more usable UI that Metro gives :-)

Forward? On the desktop in many ways it is steps backwards. It's useable, but you're comparing it to the best desktop OS/UI available, Windows 7. It is without a doubt the way forward for Windows on Tablets, Phones, and touch devices. And just to be clear, metro is just a Shell. It's Windows 7 SP3,4,5 underneath. Metro is NOT the OS, it's the Start Button displayed in a full screen tile layout. Most people don't start their day in the start menu.

Having said that, I'm installing CP on my HP Slate, hopefully it will breath life into it. The desktop UI for Windows 7 failed on tablets and touch devices worse than a touch UI fails on the desktop (OK, it's not a fail, just extremely annoying.)

rpsgc said,
It could be 50% faster, for all I care. As long as it has Metro it can rot in Oblivion.

And you bet that Oblivion is quite long... let alone Skyrim...

rpsgc said,
It could be 50% faster, for all I care. As long as it has Metro it can rot in Oblivion.

Metro may have a place on Alton Towers PC's lol!

Are some of these readers a bit dull when it comes to common sense. They only zoomed the graph so the results could stand out. Could you imagined if they reverted back to 0-114? The graph would be an annoyance to look over because its so zoomed out.

I use Windows 8 in dual boot and love it. I think Metro makes a great desktop UI once people understand it. I'm confident that Microsoft knows what they are doing and the final release will have significant changes. I'm certainly interested in performance, but the user experience is equally important, if not more.

patseguin said,
I use Windows 8 in dual boot and love it. I think Metro makes a great desktop UI once people understand it. I'm confident that Microsoft knows what they are doing and the final release will have significant changes. I'm certainly interested in performance, but the user experience is equally important, if not more.

I don't like how metro is currently implemented and I fully "understand" how windows 8 works. With Microsoft's track record of every other OS doing poorly, it's Windows 8 up to bat now.

What is with just not liking Metro they way it is currently implemented. Successful or not, they're going to have a lot to iron out, and fast, if Windows 8 on the desktop platform falls flat on its face.

acrufox said,
I don't like how metro is currently implemented and I fully "understand" how windows 8 works. With Microsoft's track record of every other OS doing poorly, it's Windows 8 up to bat now.

While they may do poorly in terms sales figures, they do succeed at one thing, providing feedback. I would call them, learned experiences.

The WinME lesson led to consumers using the NT Kernel. It also lead to Dr. Watson being internet enabled so Microsoft could gain insight from failures on those who opt in to the customer experience improvement program.

The WInXP Lesson led to improved security model and a new driver model which allowed the desktop to be rendered using the 3D parts of the GPU instead of relying on the now aging GDI.

The WinVista lesson led to a critical analysis of the overall OS architecture. With the removal of something called the 'Global Dispatcher Lock' and some other thread/process management tweaks, performance improved on the desktop and allowed the server to scale to more than double the previous limit.

The Win7 lesson led to validating and further optimizing the OS architecture. There are a few posts on channel9 which talk about how they were able to map out the architecture to see where things didn't belong, Some Kernel code was moved to user mode, and vice versa, where it made sense.

The Win8 lesson will lead to a further refinement of the transitions between the different interaction models that are Metro and Desktop.

Metro provides Microsoft, Developers and Consumers with a new way of doing things that break away from the old desktop paradigm,. and for good reason.

The desktop IS a burning platform full of 30 years of legacy issues which are maintained for backward compatibility. It really is only a matter of time before the components that make up the classic desktop are unmaintainable. The sheer multitude of software development tools available for windows give your desktop a Frankenstein appearance when you're running:
win32
.NET forms
.NET WPF
Java
Oracle Forms
PowerBuilder

As a result of all of that, I only use MS software on my systems, whenever possible. I only install third party applications when the need presents itself. And when I do, I'm horribly disappointed. The UIs are almost always inconsistent with windows, which make the applications hard to learn.

As an example, I learned early on that Microsoft built automatic column resizing into all of their grid controls by default. It's accomplished by placing the cursor between the two column headers and double-clicking. THIS doesn't work on any of the non Microsoft technologies listed above, unless the application developer specifically codes the features, or uses third party controls that have the feature.

It's minor, but annoying, and why I hate the desktop.

With Metro, all apps have the same base level of consistency which cannot be achieved on the modern desktop.

I can't wait until it's gone entirely.

This is what frustrates me.
Windows 8 is great performance wise and a nice upgrade over Windows 7. If it was just this, tweaks under the hood and a cleaning up of the UI, I'd buy into it. I can't stand the Metro side of things though; I want it to be a desktop, not a tablet.

I have a tablet. If it was set out so that the Desktop was Metro-fied with clean colours and simple text, I'd be all over this. Metro apps, not so much.

I'll have to wait for the RTM to make a final decision I guess.

If Microsoft releases an edition where I can turn off the Start screen and revert back to the Start button, I'll gladly pay more for it ($50~$100 more, but that's it).

Windows 8 will turn Windows 7 into the next Windows XP... People using Windows 7 won't upgrade for a very long time; myself included.
I'm the type of guy that always keeps all software and hardware up-to-date, but I'll make an exception with Windows 8... Horrible OS!

Nexx295 said,
Windows 8 will turn Windows 7 into the next Windows XP... People using Windows 7 won't upgrade for a very long time; myself included.
I'm the type of guy that always keeps all software and hardware up-to-date, but I'll make an exception with Windows 8... Horrible OS!

Agreed. XP is actually a truly ****ty OS but Vista didn't bring anything new to the table on the UI front. Win7 did and it's generally fairly pleasant to use. Win8 is a step back to the awfulness. It doesn't matter if it's a bit faster if it's just annoying and unintuitive to use.

Nexx295 said,
Windows 8 will turn Windows 7 into the next Windows XP... People using Windows 7 won't upgrade for a very long time; myself included.
I'm the type of guy that always keeps all software and hardware up-to-date, but I'll make an exception with Windows 8... Horrible OS!

Horrible? WinME was horrible. If one says they'd rather run that than Win8 they're smoking something AMAZINGLY bad.

laserfloyd said,

Horrible? WinME was horrible. If one says they'd rather run that than Win8 they're smoking something AMAZINGLY bad.

I used WinME and Win Vista and both where far more intuitive to use in first time usage.... unlike Windows 8. One can tolerate the slow loading times as long as one finds or knows where want to go, in Windows 8 faster times... not knowing what the hell is going on, is pretty much far more slow than WinME or Vista.

LaXu said,
.....

Intuition is the immediate comprehension of something without reason or thought.

Everyone who says win8 is unintuitive is wrong, because they are applying reason and thought to the experience. The reason and thought that goes into the analysis and resulting in the dislike of Metro is that it doesn't click with their learned behaviors.
When someone who has never touched a computer period, they can actually use metro to launch apps, acquire apps, and navigate with relative ease. I have yet to meet someone who can say the same thing about the desktop.

I'm sorry the decades of classic windows have spoiled your ability to process new things.

I have told my friends my thoughts, I feel that Windows 8 seems more reliable (to me) than Windows 7 is, things seem smoother, things seem faster, I am overall impressed. However, the new user interface I don't exactly like.

Let's put it simple, Windows 8 PC version and Windows 8 Tablet version. Microsoft is trying to sell a tablet os (for wich there is no available windows tablet divice) for PC users. Let's keep tomatoes with tomatoes. Give us a solid PC OS and when windows based tablets get available, go with Metro UI. Two different versions for two different deivices. Is that too simple or what !?!?!?

Buzz99 said,
Let's put it simple, Windows 8 PC version and Windows 8 Tablet version. Microsoft is trying to sell a tablet os (for wich there is no available windows tablet divice) for PC users. Let's keep tomatoes with tomatoes. Give us a solid PC OS and when windows based tablets get available, go with Metro UI. Two different versions for two different deivices. Is that too simple or what !?!?!?

That very well could be in the works.

As this is beta-level software it makes sense from an engineering point of view to enable as many bells and whistles as possible, gather performance and use metrics then make final marketing decisions immediately prior to release. For all we know, Metro could be relegated to the same status as the "Tablet PC Components" option in 7; it may even be designated a "Theme" to choose from display preferences. There may also be provided some hook into the hardware layer to detect and enable Metro if a touch-enabled display or compatible touchpad are connected or be could be provided in such a way that OEM's can en/disable it at OOBE / first boot.

Point being that until the OS reaches escrow builds and RTM status, we aren't privvy to what Microsoft has planned except through what information is gleaned from leaked builds. And even though we know there are several planned SKU's, it's possible that the registry keys are created as placeholders or as a means to crosscheck features by SKU but any interface changes are not enabled by the system until such time as they release the OS.

Buzz99 said,
Two different versions for two different deivices. Is that too simple or what !?!?!?

That's not the Microsoft way. If it were, you'd still be on an insecure 9x kernel, and businesses would have the NT Kernel.
But wait, then MS released Windows XP with a unified kernel for both business and home use.
Oh wait, they even had the same UI.

This is the same thing, 10 years later.
I do not want two completely disparate experiences from a single OS.

There will be apps (Metro) I want on my workstation (PC), and applications (Desktop) I want on my x64 based tablet.

dotf said,

That's not the Microsoft way. If it were, you'd still be on an insecure 9x kernel, and businesses would have the NT Kernel.
But wait, then MS released Windows XP with a unified kernel for both business and home use.
Oh wait, they even had the same UI.

This is the same thing, 10 years later.
I do not want two completely disparate experiences from a single OS.

There will be apps (Metro) I want on my workstation (PC), and applications (Desktop) I want on my x64 based tablet.

Bingo...

If a person has a tablet, laptop, desktop, TV Media center all running Windows, they want the consistency of their 'Apps' available to them on all the devices. If not it would fragment things to a mind numbing level.

Apple ALREADY is facing a problem with iOS and OS X development and user fragmentation of Apps, and they are trying to find a way to make OS X into iOS without flat making Mac users angry by 'dumbing' down OS X to the iOS level.

Microsoft has found a good mix of use Metro or use the desktop or use both, and if you don't like Metro, don't use it.

dotf said,

That's not the Microsoft way. If it were, you'd still be on an insecure 9x kernel, and businesses would have the NT Kernel.
But wait, then MS released Windows XP with a unified kernel for both business and home use.
Oh wait, they even had the same UI.

This is the same thing, 10 years later.
I do not want two completely disparate experiences from a single OS.

There will be apps (Metro) I want on my workstation (PC), and applications (Desktop) I want on my x64 based tablet.

Buzz99 said,

How would you run an "insecure 9x kernel" on a i7 ? so let all go back to Windows for workgroup 3.11 then. UI is way different as a kernel. OS X has different kernel but the same UI (almost) that everybody know and love to use...Microsoft is realy going the wrong way if they think that desktop is the same as tablets or phones. They will loose business desktop to any Linux distro. Cause people use desktops PC differently from tablets or phones.

we all know tiles 8 is faster than win 7, the trouble is the gains in speed are going to be lost in getting bounced out of the desktop unwillingly and the time wasted getting back to it, even if it is only a windows key away for users who know that others will be cursing, it's fracking annoying and I don't want metro unless I want to use it. Here's an example of the how bad metro is to normal desktop using IE. On the desktop version I have my favourites bar which shows 21 short name icons which for me covers more than the number of sites I visit daily, there are more shortcuts in the overflow area plus I have the view favourites icon to access the hundred other sites I occasionally view. all very efficient with tab windows open for fast switching of pages, pray tell me how this could be mad more efficient. Last night I tried using the metro IE, what a joke in comparison I opened a Toms window looking at reviews of pc parts, snapped it to one side had to move my cursor to the bottom corner to get metro to display again so I could open another Toms page for my next search, I don't know if there is an easier way to do it but if there is I couldn't find it. upon opening another page of parts it was difficult to read because the snapped page was taking up 25% of the screen so I decided to try and use tabs for easy switching of pages for instant comparison of parts. Well a bar dropped down from the top another popped up from the bottom and disappeared in half a second, presumably the top bar was my tabbed page but no amount of clicking anywhere would make it drop back down so I gave up "again" and went back to desktop where I swiftly and efficiently got the job done. As this is standard fare for browser operations I will not accept the "it's a beta" excuse and even when I know how to use metro IE there is no way in hell it could be used as efficiently as the desktop version. I guess there will be some replies telling me what I should have done cos "I was holding it wrong" but I had my first pc in the cpm days and I know my way around setting up and using pc's better than the Joe in the street and if I couldn't find the "correct way" of using it Joe has no chance. I like the speed of 8 I have set up the desktop the same as I use it in 7 and it works for me that way until Metro pokes it's nose in, a simple disable setting needs to be implemented in rtm but I'm not sure it will be. Another thing to note is that the keyword for MS in all their blogs is touch, touch, touch, that kinda tells you something, and the thing is desktop users won't be using touch screens as it's inefficient on the desk top and who the hell wants finger prints smears all over their screen especially if it's a glossy one. I'll leave it there for now..........

I too struggled initially with Metro IE. However once I figured out to right click to make the tab bar appear, plus sign to open a new tab, it wasn't so bad. It remembers sites you visit often or you can pin them. While you certainly can't have as many tabs as you would with desktop IE, it does it's job. I perfer browsing on my desktop so no big deal that I don't use the limited Metro (no flash or other plug-ins). Metro IE is meant for a tablet (really shouldn't be in the desktop version).

silky said,
........

Oh, I see why people don't like Metro now. They try to use outdated Desktop metaphors which do not exist in Metro.

At least I think that's your point, it's really hard to read without any line breaks.

silky said,
we all know tiles 8 is faster than win 7, the trouble is the gains in speed are going to be lost in getting bounced out of the desktop unwillingly and the time wasted getting back to it, even if it is only a windows key away for users who know that others will be cursing, it's fracking annoying and I don't want metro unless I want to use it. Here's an example of the how bad metro is to normal desktop using IE. On the desktop version I have my favourites bar which shows 21 short name icons which for me covers more than the number of sites I visit daily, there are more shortcuts in the overflow area plus I have the view favourites icon to access the hundred other sites I occasionally view. all very efficient with tab windows open for fast switching of pages, pray tell me how this could be mad more efficient. Last night I tried using the metro IE, what a joke in comparison I opened a Toms window looking at reviews of pc parts, snapped it to one side had to move my cursor to the bottom corner to get metro to display again so I could open another Toms page for my next search, I don't know if there is an easier way to do it but if there is I couldn't find it. upon opening another page of parts it was difficult to read because the snapped page was taking up 25% of the screen so I decided to try and use tabs for easy switching of pages for instant comparison of parts. Well a bar dropped down from the top another popped up from the bottom and disappeared in half a second, presumably the top bar was my tabbed page but no amount of clicking anywhere would make it drop back down so I gave up "again" and went back to desktop where I swiftly and efficiently got the job done. As this is standard fare for browser operations I will not accept the "it's a beta" excuse and even when I know how to use metro IE there is no way in hell it could be used as efficiently as the desktop version. I guess there will be some replies telling me what I should have done cos "I was holding it wrong" but I had my first pc in the cpm days and I know my way around setting up and using pc's better than the Joe in the street and if I couldn't find the "correct way" of using it Joe has no chance. I like the speed of 8 I have set up the desktop the same as I use it in 7 and it works for me that way until Metro pokes it's nose in, a simple disable setting needs to be implemented in rtm but I'm not sure it will be. Another thing to note is that the keyword for MS in all their blogs is touch, touch, touch, that kinda tells you something, and the thing is desktop users won't be using touch screens as it's inefficient on the desk top and who the hell wants finger prints smears all over their screen especially if it's a glossy one. I'll leave it there for now..........

Getting back to the desktop (or the last used application) is rather simple - hover your pointer over the upper left corner and click on it (mouse) or touch it (touch interface). Works from ANY application (games, too - even traditional games). If anything, it's easier (not harder) than doing so in 7.

ghos said,
I too struggled initially with Metro IE. However once I figured out to right click to make the tab bar appear, plus sign to open a new tab, it wasn't so bad. It remembers sites you visit often or you can pin them. While you certainly can't have as many tabs as you would with desktop IE, it does it's job. I perfer browsing on my desktop so no big deal that I don't use the limited Metro (no flash or other plug-ins). Metro IE is meant for a tablet (really shouldn't be in the desktop version).

one of my points was that Metro is for touch devices and not desktops, as ms keeps saying touch,touch,touch that says all you need to know. IE is probably one of the most used programs on a pc that was why I detailed the superiority of the desktop version compared the metro IE.

PGHammer said,

Getting back to the desktop (or the last used application) is rather simple - hover your pointer over the upper left corner and click on it (mouse) or touch it (touch interface). Works from ANY application (games, too - even traditional games). If anything, it's easier (not harder) than doing so in 7.

I was describing the difficulty in finding the tabbed pages ( I never did find them, but I'll try again sometime as I don't like to be beaten. Hey just had a moment, why don't MS sell tiles 8 as a mystery game /s) not finding the metro start screen or desktop, getting to those is easy. going to the top left corner did not show the pages I had tabbed it only showed metro IE as that was the only program open.

dotf said,

Oh, I see why people don't like Metro now. They try to use outdated Desktop metaphors which do not exist in Metro.

At least I think that's your point, it's really hard to read without any line breaks.

I used punctuation so reading my comment shouldn't pose any problems in reading and understanding it. My statement is very simple with an actual every day example of using the 2 browsers. That is much better than the I hate it comments with no explanation of why they hate it. I also hate the "so don't use it" replies that are so frequently used in response to criticism, at least I made a valid detailed comment.

silky said,

I was describing the difficulty in finding the tabbed pages ( I never did find them, but I'll try again sometime as I don't like to be beaten. Hey just had a moment, why don't MS sell tiles 8 as a mystery game /s) not finding the metro start screen or desktop, getting to those is easy. going to the top left corner did not show the pages I had tabbed it only showed metro IE as that was the only program open.

Well stuff is kind of hidden in plain sight. Microsoft didn't make a 'tutorial' video like they usually do on the RTM of all versions of Windows. I know they wanted to see how people would do with 'figuring' out some of these features on their own, to test how 'intuitive' the fast and easy stuff is to find and understand.

A minute seeing how to access the navigation and the charms and drag and drop the Apps and the right click to get the App options bars, and you will find it rather slick to navigated even with a mouse.

I watched a tech even using the scroll bar at the bottom, for a few minutes until he realized he could just slide the mouse and the screen would scroll for him, or use the mouse wheel or his track pad gestures, etc...

How 'intuitive' the UI is depends on if you have any past experience with Metro concepts or WP7 for example, If you haven't, you will need the minute tutorial to see all the quick ways to navigate through things, that actually makes Windows 7 and the taskbar seem cumbersome.

Neobond said,
Interesting to see it fails in productivity test though

The highly misleading graph makes you think it fails. The numbers (~ 8% worse) and the comment (the benchmark is being updated for Win8 as we speak) say otherwise.

Yes it does. They optimized Vista to produce Windows 7 and further optimized it to produce Windows 8. No question about it, they are doing a great job with every version as far as performance goes. But the user experience improved definitely from Vista to Windows 7 and has severely degraded to the point of unusability due to Metro virus in Windows 8. No one tries to understand why people hate Metro, it's because everything is dumbed down and less customizable, less productive, less intuitive, less dense. It's perfect for less is more types but why is forcing less is more idea on everyone a good idea? I need maximum customizability and maximum options.

xpclient said,
Yes it does. They optimized Vista to produce Windows 7 and further optimized it to produce Windows 8. No question about it, they are doing a great job with every version as far as performance goes. But the user experience improved definitely from Vista to Windows 7 and has severely degraded to the point of unusability due to Metro virus in Windows 8. No one tries to understand why people hate Metro, it's because everything is dumbed down and less customizable, less productive, less intuitive, less dense. It's perfect for less is more types but why is forcing less is more idea on everyone a good idea? I need maximum customizability and maximum options.

I don't know I was really annoyed with Metro for the first couple days but now that I've set most things I use on the "desktop" I can more or less pretend Metro isn't even there. It does give me something else to play with tho when I'm bored.

xpclient said,
....

Sounds like you want Linux.

Just saying a statement doesn't make it true.
Less productive -How?
Less intuitive -How?
Less dense -What does this even mean?

dotf said,

Sounds like you want Linux.

Just saying a statement doesn't make it true.
Less productive -How?
Less intuitive -How?
Less dense -What does this even mean?

I don't to explain that in every single post, do I? I will need to write a book on the subject. I think you know how.

xpclient said,
Yes it does. They optimized Vista to produce Windows 7 and further optimized it to produce Windows 8. No question about it, they are doing a great job with every version as far as performance goes. But the user experience improved definitely from Vista to Windows 7 and has severely degraded to the point of unusability due to Metro virus in Windows 8. No one tries to understand why people hate Metro, it's because everything is dumbed down and less customizable, less productive, less intuitive, less dense. It's perfect for less is more types but why is forcing less is more idea on everyone a good idea? I need maximum customizability and maximum options.

Metro is 'dumbed' down in a way, it is also 'smarter' in a way that you seem to not realize.

An iPad or an Android phone are 'dumbed' down as well, do you complain about them being easy to use?

It is like the people that think WP7 sucks because it is too easy because it seems to be dumbed down to them. Which makes me twitch with the logic disconnect that creates this mindset.

Just because something is easier, does not mean it is 'bad or has less features. On WP7 you can 'easily' do a lot things that you can't even do on Android or iOS. So ya it is not ONLY simpler, it works BETTER too.

The interesting part of this, is you can avoid Metro all together if you really want. Created a folder for your shortcuts, put it on the desktop or taskbar so it expands out, and never see Metro and use the computer JUST LIKE YOU DO TODAY.

So if you NEVER truly have to see metro, why do you even care?

snorge said,

I don't know I was really annoyed with Metro for the first couple days but now that I've set most things I use on the "desktop" I can more or less pretend Metro isn't even there. It does give me something else to play with tho when I'm bored.

I agree. I dont use Metro hardly at all, maybe like 0.1% of the time just to use the search feature. I use Windows 8 in almost exactly the same way at Windows 7, I just stay in the Desktop portion so they are almost identical.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,
Windows 8 fails in one major performance test - the UI quality performance test.

Yeah, where's the usability portion of this test, that's pretty important.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,
Windows 8 fails in one major performance test - the UI quality performance test.

Don't use it then.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,
Windows 8 fails in one major performance test - the UI quality performance test.

.. 'Performance' test?

Cøi said,

.. 'Performance' test?

Yes. Most people use this usability performance test to determine whether to use an OS or not.

Martin5000 said,

I'm getting bored of this response, Do you realise microsoft actually want people to use it?

then stop bitching, enter the connect site, download the feedback tool and provide opinion for them like we all who actually give a damn

Morden said,

then stop bitching, enter the connect site, download the feedback tool and provide opinion for them like we all who actually give a damn

I haven't bitched about it if you actually look. I am bored of people bitching at others for voicing their opinions.

I am interested in other peoples opinions.

Morden said,

then stop bitching, enter the connect site, download the feedback tool and provide opinion for them like we all who actually give a damn


I have. But if you think that Microsoft will abandon or have a major shift in the UI design at this point of software development, you are a naive fool. So voicing my opinion here or over more official channels is equal.

Martin5000 said,

I haven't bitched about it if you actually look. I am bored of people bitching at others for voicing their opinions.

I am interested in other peoples opinions.

it was not meant "for you" per se, but all in all feedback is the way to go

Leo (DerpDerp) said,

I have. But if you think that Microsoft will abandon or have a major shift in the UI design at this point of software development, you are a naive fool. So voicing my opinion here or over more official channels is equal.

I actually like the metro ui, I just don't like a few things as it is right now so that's why I provide feedback - it may not count at all but surely I have more chance to actually change something than somebody who only whines about the stuff on an unofficial forum - of course it's not in my right to say you shouldn't express your opinion but alas if someone wants to change things but does not care enough to actually tell MS, well...

Morden said,

I actually like the metro ui, I just don't like a few things as it is right now so that's why I provide feedback - it may not count at all but surely I have more chance to actually change something than somebody who only whines about the stuff on an unofficial forum - of course it's not in my right to say you shouldn't express your opinion but alas if someone wants to change things but does not care enough to actually tell MS, well...


Did you actually read what I wrote? And if you like the tablet interface, that's good for you. Some of us don't. And since clearly this is the design Microsoft has chosen, I say again - it would be very naive to believe that voicing my dislike of THE ENTIRE METRO UI would make a change.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,

Did you actually read what I wrote? And if you like the tablet interface, that's good for you. Some of us don't. And since clearly this is the design Microsoft has chosen, I say again - it would be very naive to believe that voicing my dislike of THE ENTIRE METRO UI would make a change.

Putting you off to the side for a minute, since your opinion of the UI is clear already, what makes you think MS hasn't done usability tests with kb and mouse users already?

I honestly find it funny how people call to question MS's choices somehow thinking they're just blindly doing this without any user data to back it up at all.

GP007 said,

Putting you off to the side for a minute, since your opinion of the UI is clear already, what makes you think MS hasn't done usability tests with kb and mouse users already?

I honestly find it funny how people call to question MS's choices somehow thinking they're just blindly doing this without any user data to back it up at all.


It is clear by the feedback regular Windows users give on the PC that is seen all over the internet. Not even heavy computer users (like me), but computer "simpletons" who just want to use their computer. The usability testing MS has conducted is for tablet UI (for the hurrs, "touch first") and it also "works" with mouse and keyboard. It's horrible.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,

It is clear by the feedback regular Windows users give on the PC that is seen all over the internet. Not even heavy computer users (like me), but computer "simpletons" who just want to use their computer. The usability testing MS has conducted is for tablet UI (for the hurrs, "touch first") and it also "works" with mouse and keyboard. It's horrible.

Or maybe you're just hearing the typical "vocal minority" the internet likes to spit out? I've used WIn8 without touch and see no issue with a KB and mouse setup. It seems some people are too start menu dependent still.

Ehhh... that should be your fail performance on adapting to the new UI, not the Windows.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,
Windows 8 fails in one major performance test - the UI quality performance test.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,

Did you actually read what I wrote? And if you like the tablet interface, that's good for you. Some of us don't. And since clearly this is the design Microsoft has chosen, I say again - it would be very naive to believe that voicing my dislike of THE ENTIRE METRO UI would make a change.

I did. if you dislike the whole os concept then you shouldn't anger yourself about it just stick with win7 and have the user experience you desire...

MDboyz said,
Ehhh... that should be your fail performance on adapting to the new UI, not the Windows.


Why would I have to adapt to something I find completely useless and retarded? It is Microsoft's failed attempt at making me adapt. I loved Vista start menu and Ribbon interface in office & co - that was a successful Microsoft attempt at making me adapt. Here they have failed miserably.

Morden said,

I did. if you dislike the whole os concept then you shouldn't anger yourself about it just stick with win7 and have the user experience you desire...


I agree, and this is what I will do. But why should I not voice my opinion on this bad product? I am not angry, I just voice my opinion.

Leo (DerpDerp) said,

I agree, and this is what I will do. But why should I not voice my opinion on this bad product? I am not angry, I just voice my opinion.

Just because you don't like it doesn't make it a bad product. Just as me liking it doesn't make it a good product. Personal opinion is such a fickle thing

Leo (DerpDerp) said,
I agree, and this is what I will do. But why should I not voice my opinion on this bad product? I am not angry, I just voice my opinion.

It's not your opinion on a bad product, it's your opinion that it is a bad product.

The rest of us who use CP daily and read everything Microsoft has put online explaining how they arrived at this experience have the opinion that it's a great change from the dated desktop metaphor we've been using for the past 17 years.

TCLN Ryster said,

Just because you don't like it doesn't make it a bad product. Just as me liking it doesn't make it a good product. Personal opinion is such a fickle thing


All I can do is express my opinion. In my opinion, it is a bad product and this I say it's a bad product.

Martin5000 said,

I am bored of people bitching at others for voicing their opinions.

I am interested in other peoples opinions.

I am bored of people bitching at people who actually like Win8. I see over and over if you like Win8, then you have only used it on a table, you are not a power user, you are not a mouse/keyboard user, you must only be using metro apps because the switching between metro and the desktop drives people crazy, and so on.

People here who like and use Win8 are just expressing their opinion, but their opinions are just dismissed and not valid. Then the whining starts because it seems like those who do not like Win8 do not feel "more equal" and their opinions should mean something more.

nohone said,

I am bored of people bitching at people who actually like Win8. I see over and over if you like Win8, then you have only used it on a table, you are not a power user, you are not a mouse/keyboard user, you must only be using metro apps because the switching between metro and the desktop drives people crazy, and so on.

People here who like and use Win8 are just expressing their opinion, but their opinions are just dismissed and not valid. Then the whining starts because it seems like those who do not like Win8 do not feel "more equal" and their opinions should mean something more.

The problem isn't people liking Metro, no one gives a crap if you like Metro, the problem is -most- of those same people that like Metro are deadset against giving the option to allow people that don't like Metro to not use it in Windows 8, I'd like to use Windows 8 without Metro, no invisible menus and no gestures, using the old Start Menu, when people say that, those people that like Metro go on to say well "Well don't use it then" or "Why even use Windows 8 if you don't like Metro?", well obviously because Windows 8 had more to offer than Metro, it's not about wanting to be -more equal-

From a consumer standpoint it makes no sense for these people to be siding with Microsoft against choice, as if choice was a bad thing for consumers.

Martin5000 said,

I'm getting bored of this response, Do you realise microsoft actually want people to use it?

Do you realize how 'tiny' of a percentage your opinion falls into? Sure the blogs and comments get the 'bad, sucks, blah, fire bad, beer good', but the people that ACTUALLY use it for even a few minutes LIKE IT.

So at this point, why complain about something you 'think' you will continue to hate, and probably will end up really liking, and even if you don't, your voice is falling on deaf ears.

There are people that 'get' Metro and like it, and also find it faster and more productive for both novices and POWER users.

This is the same, crap that has been shouted out since Windows 3.0 rolled out and DOS/CLI nuts said it was made for idiots and wasn't worth their time... Until they noticed they could flip between their DOS applications and multi-task them and be doing other things while files were downloading, and on and on, and found that it was a power user's dream.

a1ien said,
Nice... because Linux (say Ubuntu) also beats Windows 7 in over half of these performance tests.

http://www.tomshardware.com/re...-benchmark-review,3121.html

I want better from such an expensive OS (as opposed to a free one).

Nonsense. Hardly anyone makes or uses tar.gz files on windows, and while the Radeon HD 4800 might be state of the art in Linux world no would consider optimising this 4-year old graphics card on windows today.

a1ien said,
Nice... because Linux (say Ubuntu) also beats Windows 7 in over half of these performance tests.

http://www.tomshardware.com/re...-benchmark-review,3121.html

I want better from such an expensive OS (as opposed to a free one).

Wow, that is some good kool-aid. In that performance 'review' the majority of the tests were done with cross platform code that originated on Linux.

And in case you don't why this matters, having an optimized string parser in code and using procedural call to an Object based OS like NT, is wasted CPU cycles on NT, but needed and helps the performance of the code on Linux.

So sure the code ports and runs, but it duplicates functionality NT is already doing, and also deals with things in a highly unoptimized structure to what NT can utilized that Linux cannot.

There is such a massive difference in the OS models and kernel architectures it HARD to create equivalent code that uses the advantage of each OS, and when you set up the tests with a majority of software target for one platform, that platform is going to usually win those tests, almost EVERY TIME.

It amazes me that a review like this even got past a CS 101 graduate level editor, let alone published on their site.

Seriously, go back and look at the tests and relevance and significance.

Things 'inherent' to the OS, the respective OS wins, things not inherent or originally written for the OS the respective OS loses. Like Zip vs tar.gz, notice the pattern?

Next notice they are STILL benchmarking 'startup' and 'shutdown' times. Why? A Windows 7 user should never be doing a full startup or shutdown unless the monthly updates initiate a restart a 3AM that the user never sees. The days of needing a fresh boot died when the Win9X monolithic crap kernel died 12 years ago.

And notice the important one, like 'wake' Windows 7 is faster.

Even take a look at the file copy times and how they did the test, really? How about load time testing or data write and read testing, which the 'superfetch' system in Windows 7 would blow Ubuntu away? Or how about network synchronization that uses differential copy technology, weird that wasn't tested too...


The whole review was done it a way that was so subjective and so pointless for both Ubuntu and Windows 7.

The visual impact of the graph is misleading because of the false origin.
And I'd rather have a 'proper' desktop with a start menu, rather than a few percent extra performance.

gb8080 said,
The visual impact of the graph is misleading because of the false origin.

Exactly what I thought, glad I'm not the only one who finds these things annoying.

gb8080 said,
The visual impact of the graph is misleading because of the false origin.
And I'd rather have a 'proper' desktop with a start menu, rather than a few percent extra performance.

What difference does it make if the graph starts at 90 or 0 when the final numbers are 114 to 100? Regardless of how you look at it the Windows 8 number is higher.

GP007 said,

What difference does it make if the graph starts at 90 or 0 when the final numbers are 114 to 100? Regardless of how you look at it the Windows 8 number is higher.

You could say it is misleading to idiots who don't know how to interpret graph data. MS needs those folks to shell out some cash for Windows 8, apparently.

gb8080 said,
The visual impact of the graph is misleading because of the false origin.
And I'd rather have a 'proper' desktop with a start menu, rather than a few percent extra performance.

And that is what pretty much *all* the detractors have been saying.

Basically, never mind the new features, improved performance, even better backward compatibility than any previous version of Windows - I would rather stick with what I know.

Isn't that why Windows XP stuck around for five years?

No thanks.

I'm running the Windows 8 Consumer Preview *because* of the better performance, better features, and better compatibility (hardware and software) than Windows 7 x64+SP1. The StartScreen can be learned (and is amazingly easy TO learn) - even for keyboard and mouse jockeys. (And, as always, I'm still on a traditional desktop.)

GP007 said,
What difference does it make if the graph starts at 90 or 0 when the final numbers are 114 to 100? Regardless of how you look at it the Windows 8 number is higher.

Because it makes it look as if the Metro bar is twice as large as the one for the RealOS, which is misleading.

M V E said,
From 90? It's just a marketing bulls**t.

Yeah, a simple graph starting from 90 suddenly makes the difference between 100 and 114 nothing.
... Duh, nobody will think 'ZOMG WINDOWS 8 IS 3X FASTER' when seeing this graph.

M V E said,
From 90? It's just a marketing bulls**t.

The graph was a bs move, but 14% is 14%, same hardware? That's pretty good code. We'll see if RTM remains 14% faster.

MorganX said,

The graph was a bs move, but 14% is 14%, same hardware? That's pretty good code. We'll see if RTM remains 14% faster.

RTM could be quicker if they clean up things more and also turn off any debug/reporting tools that could always be working in the background collecting data.

GP007 said,

RTM could be quicker if they clean up things more and also turn off any debug/reporting tools that could always be working in the background collecting data.


or it will be about same as W7, when they add some more stuff.

M V E said,
From 90? It's just a marketing bulls**t.

They could've benchmarked 7, called that the "baseline" or "0", then benchmarked 8 and marked it accordingly, + or - compared to 7, which would make 7 "0" and 8 "14" on the graph. Alternately, they could've called 8 "0" and 7 would then be "-14".

Seems no matter what anyone does there will be someone from the p-nut gallery who claims BS, manipulation or something other fraud.

Regression_88 said,

They could've benchmarked 7, called that the "baseline" or "0", then benchmarked 8 and marked it accordingly, + or - compared to 7, which would make 7 "0" and 8 "14" on the graph. Alternately, they could've called 8 "0" and 7 would then be "-14".

Seems no matter what anyone does there will be someone from the p-nut gallery who claims BS, manipulation or something other fraud.

People don't understand that it just appeals to their ignorance!

Regression_88 said,

They could've benchmarked 7, called that the "baseline" or "0", then benchmarked 8 and marked it accordingly, + or - compared to 7, which would make 7 "0" and 8 "14" on the graph. Alternately, they could've called 8 "0" and 7 would then be "-14".

Seems no matter what anyone does there will be someone from the p-nut gallery who claims BS, manipulation or something other fraud.

You're kidding right. You cannot just re-"baseline" the data. It absolutely matters what the scale is. So if you you say you re-baseline 7 as 1 and 8 as 14. Is windows 8 14x better? No. It is 14% better.

what if windows 7 was 1000 and windows 8 was 1014. can you baseline windows 7 1 and windows 8 "14"? Of course not. In this case windows 8 is only 1.4% better. As you can see the magnitude of the starting point, however arbitrary, definitely matters.

Re"baselining" data is classic manipulation of data to make small differences look significant, when in some case they are not.

For all we know they could have run this test 100 times, every time come up with a slightly different number and chose the largest discrepancy. Makes for a great news story. It's so easy to manipulate meaningless data and make it look significant to tell a story.

Yes. The baseline can be set to anything as long as the scale stays intact, but then where did he mention anything about modifying the scale? ;-)

Win8 is nowhere near done. It will get "greatly" slower "much" faster than any other OS, because of everything that has not yet been added.

M V E said,
From 90? It's just a marketing bulls**t.

Ok, you and the replies that agree with you, need to go find your grade school math teachers and slap them.

Seriously, how can any education system leave people with a lapse in thinking this severe?