Researchers Break Internet Speed Records

At the Internet2 consortium's spring meeting in Arlington, Virginia, it was publically announced that a group of researchers led by the University of Tokyo had broken Internet speed records – twice in two days. On December 30, researchers sent data at 7.67 gigabits per second, using standard communications protocols. The next day, using modified protocols, the team broke the record again by sending data over the same 20,000-mile path at 9.08 Gbps. Researchers used the IPv6 Internet addressing system to break the records in December. Data started in Tokyo and went to Chicago, Amsterdam and Seattle before returning to Tokyo.

The previous high of 6.96 Gbps was set in November 2005. Speed records under the older addressing system, IPv4, are in a separate category and stand at 8.8 Gbps, set in February 2006. Rules require a 10% improvement for recognition, a percentage that would bring the next record right at the Internet2's current theoretical limit of 10 Gbps. Not willing to give up, the Internet2 consortium is planning to build a new network with a capacity of 100 Gbps. The Internet2 is run by a consortium of more than 200 U.S. universities. It is currently working to merge with another ultrahigh-speed, next-generation network, called National LambdaRail.

News source: Physorg

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Windows Vista Beta 2, RC1 and RC2 set to expire May 31, 2007

Next Story

Chinese court rules Yahoo violated music copyrights

16 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

That's pretty awesome. Right now I have 5 Mbps. I used to have 15 Mbps but that was just ridiculous but for only $50 I might go back sometime.

Does anyone actually have a disk system that can take advantage of such speed? No. This sort of technology will be limited to backbones and server farms. Although it would be nice to have the weak link be something else besides your internet connection. In this case your Dual 10k RPM Raptors in RAID 0 would be your "weak link". It actually sounds quite pathetic.

Ravensworth said,
Can you even imagine? Then again I can remember when the thought of having dial-up internet in my home was a dream, rather than staying late at school to use it. Then DSL came along and that was a crazy fantasy, having a fast 24 hour connection that didn't tie up the phone. Now I take it for granted. Still, being able to download nearly 8 GB in a second blows my mind.

That's 8 gigabits, not 8 gigabytes.

:)

7.67 gigabits per second

Can you even imagine? Then again I can remember when the thought of having dial-up internet in my home was a dream, rather than staying late at school to use it. Then DSL came along and that was a crazy fantasy, having a fast 24 hour connection that didn't tie up the phone. Now I take it for granted. Still, being able to download nearly 8 GB in a second blows my mind.

FYI: b=bit, B=byte... 1B=8b. So it's 8gigabits, not 8gigabytes. A 5MB MP3 would take 8 seconds to download at 5Mb/s.

Funny though, I work for a company that does the promotional sales for most of the major ISPs in the US, and almost everyone says x megabytes per second, not realizing that they are saying a speed 8 times faster than what the customer is actually getting. lol if the consumers knew though, that would be one big lawsuit.

The previous internet speed record: The time it took from creation of a thread with a Vista problem to the first troll that said "Vista sux".

It is hard to be faster than the trolls.

Think what happens to the movie/music industry if this ever gets into consumer hands. Whole movies downloaded in a second or so, your whole music library in a couple...

Of course, lots of legal and illegal potential!