Researchers Craft HDTV's Successor

Japanese engineers at Nippon Hoso Kyokai's Science and Technical Research Laboratories showed off their most recent work with the development of Super Hi-Vision, a system they hope will eventually replace HDTV. A SHV picture is made up of 4,320 horizontal picture lines and 7,680 vertical lines (equivalent to 16 tiled HDTV screens). In the year since it was last demonstrated, the company has moved away from multiple sensors and has developed a single image sensor for use in TV cameras that can shoot an entire SHV screen. A prototype SHV camera fitted with the sensor was set up about 3 meters away from a scene that included a newspaper. It was possible to read the stories printed on the newspaper on a monitor displaying the image – an undertaking that would be difficult on today's high-definition systems. The sensor is monochrome and NHK says a color image is possible by simply using three in a camera, one for each primary color.

An uncompressed SHV signal has a bit-rate of 24Gbps – since it can't be broadcast, the problem falls onto the task of real-time encoding and decoding of such a high-bandwidth signal. NHK and Fujitsu Limited have solved the issue by linking 16 encoders in parallel and essentially compressing the SHV signal to around 1/200th of its size using MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 compression. The result is a Super Hi-Vision image of 128Mbps, which is still about six times the bandwidth of today's high-definition broadcasting. Right now the encoder system stands almost as tall as a person and requires a similarly large unit on the reception end. Engineers will have to shrink this into a handful of chips before it's ready for a television set. NHK isn't saying when Super Hi-Vision services might begin.

News source: PC World

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Just remember guys that HDTV was first researched in the 1970s. It's only now making headway into our living rooms. It'll be even longer before all broadcasts are done in HD.

If SHV is just being researched now, it'll be a long while before we see it in the commercial sector.

what's the point of recording in such a high resolution when you have to compress it that much, keep the resolution lower, compress less, same quality

I expect the point is that you have to compress it now, but in 10-20 years who knows? I suspect (I don't really know) it'd be better to have the underlying technology there, and hope the infrastructure comes along to be able to use it...

XerXis said,
what's the point of recording in such a high resolution when you have to compress it that much, keep the resolution lower, compress less, same quality

That's right. We don't need higher resolution--a good HD source is pretty impressive in its own right. We just need cable/satellite providers to stop compressing the **** out of the current signal. Higher-still resolution only compounds that problem, making it pointless. The bandwidth needs to catch up first.

In 2040/2050 america or japan might get this, then another 10 years later it might happen in the uk!

Either way woud it make that much diffrence? your average size tv at home is most likley 26-40" ish woud you even notice a diffrence on TV's that size?

No you wouldn't notice... At 5 feet, with a 40inch screen, 1080p is the limit. So if you have a 1080p 40 inch TV and you sit further than 5 feet from it you are wasting 1080p. For a 120 inch screen (10 feet) the limit is 10 feet (pixels are 0.6 inches/1.5mm) in size. So for many people's homes if you sit further than 10 feet from a TV the size of your wall..... you are wasting 1080p.

Wow... i think that is incredible. Can't wait to see the technology in action. I believe that it will be a long while until it is a broadcast format.

HDTV adoption is taking a long time. Earlier this year, I purchased a really nice 32" HDTV for $500 on a promotional deal. Now I see 32" HDTV's for $500 as a norm. That is a large set compared to the size of a lot of people's SDTVs that I know. I bet the low end HDTV will be around $350 sometime next year. that should be affordable for middle income families IMO.

It has taken 50 years to go from standard definition color TV to HDTV.
The next standard will probably take as much time to become common place.

Yeah, this is a long way off. Even if it were possible now, implementing it would surely be the death of both HD and SHV as consumers say "Screw you" and give up on trying to keep up.

neufuse said,
this will take decades to come in... HDTV was in the works for almost a few decades itself...

Mainly because the TV manufacturers refused to cooperate with the government and then only by pricing the "new" out of the reach of the average consumer, even to this day, a basic HDTV costs more than the average wage earner can realistically afford

z0phi3l said,

Mainly because the TV manufacturers refused to cooperate with the government and then only by pricing the "new" out of the reach of the average consumer, even to this day, a basic HDTV costs more than the average wage earner can realistically afford

I'm pretty sure spending $500-700 on a new TV is not out of the average persons reach. Considering the average person income in america is over $40,000 and the average two person income is near $70,000. Basically what it comes down to is that you are just pulling things out of your ass.

reidtheweed01 said,

I'm pretty sure spending $500-700 on a new TV is not out of the average persons reach. Considering the average person income in america is over $40,000 and the average two person income is near $70,000. Basically what it comes down to is that you are just pulling things out of your ass.

Sorry but you've not adjusted your figures for inflation and higher cost of living. Owning a home now is terribly expensive as real estate in major cities - at least in North America - continues to climb.And almost nobody saves money because they've barely enough to go by. Lest of which the problem is now *job security*

This avg. of $70k for dual income household is a bit much. Many couples earning dual incomes are below this figure because they're uneducated, work for low wages and work double shifts. Last thing they're going to want to do is buy a $700 TV when they don't have time to watch it.

And never mind "can afford" why would I spend, $700 just to watch television? Take a vacation instead. Plenty of "free" television there if that's all you want to do.

Where did you get that the cost of living is continuing to climb. The prices for houses have been slowly dropping in many places, and it doesn't look like it's going to be going up again anytime soon. So I'm not sure where you got that owning homes are continuing to get more expensive.

This article probably warrants a link to this page, and the proposed standard is no joke :)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UHDV

That resolution and 22.2 surround sound. Mmm...

A 12 cm Holographic Versatile Disc at 3 micrometer separation of different colored tracks (with a capacity of 3.9 TB) would be able to store roughly 11 hours of MPEG-2 or 22 hours of H264 or VC1 compressed UHDV, compared to the 18 and a half minutes of uncompressed UHDV

sounds nice . . but aren't broadcasters gonig to have a bandwidth issue .. heck even todays 1080 broadcasts are stretching it pretty thin. . . we won't see this anytime soon . . although the year 2020 is looking promising.