Reuters employee indicted in Anonymous hacking case

In one of the oddest cases yet that involves the Anonymous hacker group, a current employee of the Reuters news service was indicted on Thursday by the US Justice Department, claiming that he helped members of the group in their efforts to deface the Los Angeles Times website.

According to the Justice Department's press release, Matthew Keys, 26, of Secaucus, New Jersey, was charged on three counts: "one count each of conspiracy to transmit information to damage a protected computer, transmitting information to damage a protected computer and attempted transmission of information to damage a protected computer."

The press release stated that Keys used to work at KTXL FOX 40 in Sacramento, California as a web producer but was fired in October 2010. In December 2010, Keys allegedly gave members of Anonymous passwords that belonged to the TV station's parent, the Tribune Company. Anonymous later defaced a story on the the Tribune Company's Los Angeles Times website, with alleged encouragement by Keys.

Keys is currently an employee of Reuters as a deputy social media editor. On his Twitter feed Thursday, Keys claimed ignorance of the situation, saying, "I found out the same way most of you did: From Twitter." If convicted of all three charges, Keys faces a maximum of 25 years in prison and fines of up to $750,000.

Source: US Justice Department | Image via TechNutty

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Xbox 360 top selling US console for 26th consecutive month

Next Story

Samsung's Tizen phone coming later this year; threat to Windows Phone?

28 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Justice is... stupid. They will make sure he gets maximum even though the murderers and rapist do community service. Paedophiles are covered up by the government. Long live the western civilization.

ILikeTobacco said,
Pedo's end up on a national list and have 0 privacy where any joe blow can look up their past. But hey, who cares about facts.

Might be the case in the US, but if you followed the news in the UK then you would understand why there is such a huge problem

I highly doubt u would get 25 years for what he did... A fair sentence would be probation or a year maybe... but 25... That would be silly... I can shoot someone and only get 25 years...

Technically it is because the term has a number of definitions, one of which is as basic as gaining access to a computer system without permission. This falls under that definition. It's really no different than social engineering which has been lumped into the "hacking" category these days.

ILikeTobacco said,
Technically it is because the term has a number of definitions, one of which is as basic as gaining access to a computer system without permission. This falls under that definition. It's really no different than social engineering which has been lumped into the "hacking" category these days.

you can also take the definition of permission differently too.... giving someone a password technically is giving them permission, the question is did the person who gave them to you HAVE permission to give them...

I love how he was convicted already oh wait he has not been, yet most of you say he is. Nice Guilty until proven innocent mentality there.

Helix512 said,
I love how he was convicted already oh wait he has not been, yet most of you say he is. Nice Guilty until proven innocent mentality there.

'innocent until proven guilty' no longer exists in America. Everyone is guilty until proven not guilty.

If you know anything about the system, you know this could be anything and complete BS just to apply pressure or fluff up their own agenda. Can you imagine giving a kid 25 years for this? You could murder the editor and only do half that time. Prosecutors are the most vile corrupt slithering pieces of garbage on the planet, they care nothing for innocence or justice. THEY'RE the ones that are guilty until proven innocent in my eyes.

Oh shut up you fool. IF he did wrong he will be prosecuted under the law of the land. He will have a fair trial and be judged by his peers. The sentence may or may not be 25 years as it clearly states a MAXIMUM custodial sentence in the main post and not a MINIMUM.

You are a naive fool if you believe the justice system is anything but a rigged system.. Grand juries are the prime example, almost guaranteed verdicts. But hey, keep believing in fairly tales if it makes you feel better. Clearly, you have NO experience are talking out your ass.

Read this yesterday....the kid pretty much just wasted his life. 26 years old and if he gets the max, he will be 50 before he is released. What an idiot.

techbeck said,
Read this yesterday....the kid pretty much just wasted his life. 26 years old and if he gets the max, he will be 50 before he is released. What an idiot.

He won't and if he does I think that's a bit ridiculous seeing as though he hasn't done anything to hurt anyone and other people have done a lot worse and got so little.

ingramator said,

He won't and if he does I think that's a bit ridiculous seeing as though he hasn't done anything to hurt anyone and other people have done a lot worse and got so little.

Neither do shop lifters but they are prosecuted and punished. The guy broke the law, committed a crime and he needs to pay for it. He should of thought about the consequences of his actions before he did it.

techbeck said,

Neither do shop lifters but they are prosecuted and punished. The guy broke the law, committed a crime and he needs to pay for it. He should of thought about the consequences of his actions before he did it.

Yeah and that's why you don't get a life sentence for shop lifting so I don't see your point... Crimes with computers get sentences which are so knee-jerk because the law can't keep up with technology.

ingramator said,

Yeah and that's why you don't get a life sentence for shop lifting so I don't see your point... Crimes with computers get sentences which are so knee-jerk because the law can't keep up with technology.

25 years is not a life sentence and chances are, he wont serve close to that. He helped ANON hack in to a system and computer hacking is a FEDERAL offense. With ANON being in the news and the Government commenting and making plans for better cyber security...this kid is king of the morons.

Neobond said,
I checked his Twitter feed and he seems oblivious to it, strange one

Still seems rather oblivious to it , maybe he has been instructed to say nothing by his legal representatives.

Still doesn't justify the potential penalty. He may be responsible for his actions but he's not responsible for the knee-jerk legislation as the previous poster pointed out. 25 years for internet graffiti? Sounds more like the government is counting on prison sentences instead of an actual "cyber terrorism" strategy. This is shameful.

Odom said,
Aren't you all jumping the gun? So far it is only "alleged" that something was done, nothing is proven yet.

For the Justice Dept to bring up charges like this, they much have pretty good evidence.