Review

Review: HTC Titan

After reviewing the HTC Radar a couple of weeks ago, today I have a hands-on review of the second Windows Phone from HTCs October 2011 WP7 device refresh. The phone is called the HTC Titan, and it certainly is a Titan in all respects.

The device is dominated by a massive 4.7-inch display on the front, a slim, black and very HTC design along with a processor that’s much faster than previous Windows Phones. Essentially this device is an upgrade from the first-gen HTC HD7, and an upgrade it certainly is.

Our HTC Titan was kindly provided, as always, by MobiCity, so a big thanks to them for allowing us to conduct this review. Please check them out if you are thinking of buying a Titan.

Specifications

Below is a full table of the HTC Titan’s specifications. As you can see, the device’s main feature is the 4.7” 480 x 800 display and single-core Qualcomm processor at 1.5 GHz. It also features 16 GB of internal storage and an 8 MP camera, already cementing itself as a top-of-the-line HTC device.

  HTC Titan
Product Codes X310e
Codenamed "HTC Eternity"
GSM Bands 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Bands HSPA 850 / 900 / 2100
Display 4.7-inch 480x800 S-LCD
200 ppi pixel density
5-point capacitive multi-touch
Gorilla Glass
Processor Qualcomm MSM8255T Snapdragon (S2) chipset
1.5 GHz single-core Scorpion CPU
Graphics Adreno 205
RAM 512 MB
Storage 16 GB internal storage
12.8 GB available storage space
Connectivity WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth 2.1 with A2DP
A-GPS
DLNA
FM Radio
Camera 8 MP rear camera with autofocus and dual-LED flash
1.3 MP front camera
720p video recording (rear)
Ports MicroUSB (charging, data)
3.5mm audio jack
Sensors Accelerometer
Magnetometer
Gyroscope
Light sensor
Proximity sensor
Battery Li-ion 1,600 mAh removable
Launch OS Windows Phone 7.5 "Mango"
Launch Date October 2011
Size & Weight 131.5 x 70.7 x 9.9 mm
160 g

Really there are no notable emissions from the specification list, except for the microSD card slot which not many Windows Phones have anyway and only 720p video recording despite specs that could easily support 1080p.

Review Index

This review is pretty lengthy, so if you only want to find out about certain features skip to the appropriate section below, or simply watch the video overview on the next page.

  1. Introduction and Specifications
  2. Video Overview
  3. Design and Display
  4. Software
  5. Performance
  6. Camera
  7. Media Playback & Call Quality
  8. Battery Life and Conclusion
Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Apple's television project: could it be a stealth game console?

Next Story

A smartphone that runs Windows 8 is in the works

53 Comments

View more comments

bushbrother said,
What about the App store and how this compares to Android/iOS? Does it really make a HUGE difference, or is it just missing fart apps? I am interested in WP7 but the app store is the last thing to convince me ...

The app store (Marketplace) has really improved since the beginning of WP7. There are a lot of quality apps available, and of course it doesn't have the same amount as the App Store/Market it still has a reasonable 35,000. I would recommend checking the Marketplace out in a local phone store for more information

Scorpus said,

The app store (Marketplace) has really improved since the beginning of WP7. There are a lot of quality apps available, and of course it doesn't have the same amount as the App Store/Market it still has a reasonable 35,000. I would recommend checking the Marketplace out in a local phone store for more information

THANKS!

"only 720p video recording despite specs that could easily support 1080p."

Just so you know, the S2 snapdragon SoC's, of which MSM8255T is one, don't support 1080p video capture or 1080p video playback - they both max out at 720p. 1080p was only introduced in S3 chips.

~Johnny said,
"only 720p video recording despite specs that could easily support 1080p."

Just so you know, the S2 snapdragon SoC's, of which MSM8255T is one, don't support 1080p video capture or 1080p video playback - they both max out at 720p. 1080p was only introduced in S3 chips.

Strange, as the device does indeed support 1080p video playback...

Scorpus said,

Strange, as the device does indeed support 1080p video playback...

Zune transcodes it to 720p video at sync.

Edited by ~Johnny, Oct 28 2011, 2:01pm :

What does the speakerphone sound like? The last HTC phone I had was an HD2 and the speakerphone was too bad to use. You'd get lots of vibrations and other noise that made it unusable. I'm considering this phone but only if the speakerphone produces good, clean sound.

For me it would have been a viable alternative to the iPhone 4S if it were available in a 64GB model or at the very least a 32GB model with a mini-sd slot which can support up to 32GB cards. I'd love someone to explain to me what is up with Windows Phone 7.5 devices that have great specifications in all other areas but when it comes to storage they're horribly lacking.

The (sole) blame for that is HTC themselves. They've been doing this (featuring mobiles w/ decent-to-outstanding performance specs, and gimping devices with ridiculously meager amounts of ROM/flash RAM) since they started manufacturing Windows Mobile 5.0 devices back in '04/05. Infuriating stuff, really.

kizuran said,
The (sole) blame for that is HTC themselves. They've been doing this (featuring mobiles w/ decent-to-outstanding performance specs, and gimping devices with ridiculously meager amounts of ROM/flash RAM) since they started manufacturing Windows Mobile 5.0 devices back in '04/05. Infuriating stuff, really.

For me it wouldn't be so bad if they gimped the built in memory to keep the price low but said, 'Hey, here is a slot, cram it with as much storage as you like' - I'd be a happy camper. The lack of real storage sizes goes beyond HTC though because all the Windows Phone devices I've seen are horribly gimped - even the new Windows Phone 7 devices from Nokia are horribly crippled beyond belief with only 16GB of storage.

Really - are there people out there who have hardly any music or something? I'm 30 years old and just casually accumulating CD's over 15 or so years has resulted in a 150GB+ library of music (be it encoded using AAC set to quality of 127) - does everyone else just have half a dozen singles in their library or something?

Why does it seem like every single Windows Phone is the same, except for physical screen size and what add-on memory chip size they use?

I was in Europe last week and I had a chance to play with a Titan in a store; while I use both a HD2 and a HD7 therefore familiar with big devices I found that the Titan is too big, my opinion of course. The HD 7 is, again my opinion, the limit for a cellular phone, at least for average user.
What I also noted is that a screen of that dimension does not get along well with the OS specs: the tiles appears.... just too big; mind it there are no issue as pixilation but simply put everything seems too big.
So far my next phone will be a SIM Free Samsung Focus S, nothing on the horizon more appealing........ so far.

For a phone this big, why is the battery so small. Why can't they make the logic board smaller and make it sit in 1/2 the phone, and let the battery take up the rest?

If Apple can do it, I know others can.

why can I only read the first page of this review?
Clicking next or a page number always brings me back to the first page???

I don't understand why the power button location is such a big deal. Do you often turn your phone on and off? I don't have a real smartphone (have a LG Rumor touch), but I just don't see why you would turn it on and off so much, but this author kept mentioning it.
I actually disagree with his suggested placement, then perhaps could hit when you didn't wish to.

Doesn't seem to be very quick IMO. Apps open slower than on the SGSII, don't have an iPhone4S so can't compare but I'd imagine that is even quicker.

cashman said,
Doesn't seem to be very quick IMO. Apps open slower than on the SGSII, don't have an iPhone4S so can't compare but I'd imagine that is even quicker.

It's plenty fast. There's more to speed than how fast apps open. There's how apps perform under your finger, how responsive and consistent the UI is, and how usable the results are.

Although, it's worth noting the that HTC Hub demoed is one of the slowest apps to launch out there, and certainly not among the best performing. Other apps demoed in the video are a lot faster and more responsive.

Edited by ~Johnny, Oct 30 2011, 2:41pm :

Commenting is disabled on this article.