Review

Review: Microsoft Wedge Mouse

A mouse is a very personal item, as what works for you, may not work for others. Some like their mice with loads of buttons while others prefer ergonomics and yet some want a corded mouse and others want a wireless mouse. Whatever your preference is, it’s best to try out a few mice before making a purchase; if you have that luxury at your local retail establishment.

Microsoft has put out a new line of peripherals, the Wedge mouse and Wedge keyboard. This review focuses on the Wedge mouse but we will follow up shortly with the Wedge Keyboard.

The Wedge mouse rings up the cash register at 69.95 and is a compact mouse based around a touch sensitive plane. Measuring in at 2.39 inches wide and 2.11 inches in length, the mouse is quite small.

The Wedge mouse is attractive, minimalist, and built of high quality materials; the mouse only comes in one color, black. The surface of the mouse doesn’t exhibit fingerprints but oil from your skin does show up on the device with prolonged use.

On the back of the device where the two molded pieces of plastic meet there is a gap where a light shines through when pairing the device for the first time. From that point on, the light is off, although we suspect it will light up when the battery runs low. On the bottom there is one button and one switch. The power button turns the device on and off and assists with pairing the device to your PC or tablet. The switch, when activated, releases the battery door with a quick sliding mechanism that slides one edge of the wedge open. There are also two small plastic risers on the bottom for easy sliding and to keep the button/switch from accidently being activated.

The mouse uses Microsoft’s BlueTrak technology and Bluetooth to connect to your PC/tablet. The device takes one AA battery and to preserve battery life, the mouse has “backpack” mode that turns it off automatically when not in use.  We did not have a chance to test the battery life of the mouse as these types of devices typically run for months before the battery expires.

When you first pick up the mouse you will notice two things, it’s quite small and it has a bit of weight to it. It’s not a heavy mouse but it doesn’t feel hollow either; the weight is good and the peripheral is made of high quality plastics.

The mouse is certainly attractive and when you place it on a desk with the Wedge keyboard and a tablet, it fills out the picture of the mobile warrior who is here to work but has a sense of style too. The flat black look is appealing and something we quite like; it works well in practice too.

Pairing the device with our Samsung Series 7 slate running Windows 8 was a breeze and took only a matter of seconds to get the mouse up and running. 

Being such a small mouse, you certainly lose a bit of ergonomics with the device. While using it for a constant 8 hours during the work day might become a bit tiresome, using the Wedge mouse as your travel companion could be the ideal scenario.

The mouse is accurate and articulate with its movements on a variety of surfaces and operates nearly identical to all of the other Microsoft mice we have used. Gesturer support, when paired with Windows 8, is natural and works as advertised. The gesture plane on the mouse is a bit small (no surprise here given its size) but it is responsive to our movements. One issue we had was that it scrolled ridiculously fast out of the box when surfing the web but a quick settings change in Windows 8 fixed this issue.

Because of its size, the Wedge mouse will likely be a consideration for those who need a travel mouse, not a daily driver which makes the $69.95 price tag a bit harder to swallow. When you think about bringing along the Wedge mouse with your tablet (or the upcoming Surface), it’s role becomes a bit more apparent. In our opinion, the Wedge mouse is the device you bring with your Windows 8 tablet as it is compact, full featured, and has a touch of style. What the mouse is not, is a replacement for your desktop peripheral.

In our testing, we really enjoyed the mouse with the expectation that it is a mobile warrior and not daily driver.  With a slew of Windows 8 tablets coming out right around the corner, the Wedge Mouse is an excellent companion to pair with your device.  

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52 Comments

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Definitely agree with the others. 8 is too high a score when taking into account the cons you yourself posted as part of the review. Price, ergonomics and travel only. I think a 6 might be more reasonable. That was the number floating around in my head as I read your review.

That looks really uncomfortable, and besides I'll never buy another Microsoft mouse. I'm tired of having to replace them all the time due to shorts, buttons going bad, etc. My last one was a 4500 and it lasted two months before the scroll wheel died in it.

Cyda said,

Is that 69.95 Pounds, Dollars, Euro?

NVM. Found it further down the article. Might want to remember not everyone is from the US.

Man, the Microsoft haters are everywhere! Could just buy something else but no, you act as though Microsoft killed your personal, living pet mouse by releasing this. Getting really ridiculous.

I would think if it had features like the Microsoft Presenter mouse, then it would be a nice step up for the travellers.

My suspicion is that most business travellers at least give presentations, making the presenter a better MS option.

Looks nice. Gesture support will be good for Win8. I like that it only needs one battery. I really dig the design. Probably get one of these to replace my current Microsoft Bluetooth notebook mouse 5000 eventually.

You say that you anticipate the battery will last for months, but my 5000 mouse seems to eat through batteries, typically chewing through two AAAs in a couple weeks it seems.

This review was not very helpful. I would've liked to hear more about what gestures are supported in Windows 8 and how well the mouse worked for these gestures.

"Gesturer support, when paired with Windows 8, is natural and works as advertised."

So does that mean, you can swipe from right to bring up charms?

How about scrolling? I have the touch mouse which is nice ONLY for accelerated scroll but not nearly as accurate as scrolling with the ball. Does it compare to the rollerball in the scrolling department?

No pinch to zoom I am guessing either?

How about flicking with thumb to go back and forth on websites, does that work like the touchmouse?

Thanks... J. Peterman would have been proud...
JF

Wow that thing is small. That being said, I am curious to see how it works for someone with big hands. I have a Microsoft Bluetooth notebook mouse 5000 that I love, and it fits my hand perfectly. But if this is smaller, and I can still use it comfortably, I may be interested in purchasing one to pair with my 14in notebook that goes everywhere. I guess I have to wait for either Office Depot or Best Buy to get some in stock so I can play with it.

I have big hands. Whenever I use small mice, I find myself rubbing my wrists on the desk. It might not be a big deal, but after prolonged use of it and whenever frustration is on a max these mice make things even worse.
Good looking though!

How can the mouse get an 8 when ergonomics are bad? Ergonomics in a mouse is the most important thing. If that's bad then the mouse is ****, period.

sanctified said,
How can the mouse get an 8 when ergonomics are bad? Ergonomics in a mouse is the most important thing. If that's bad then the mouse is ****, period.

Is there such a thing as an ergonomic travel mouse?

sanctified said,
How can the mouse get an 8 when ergonomics are bad? Ergonomics in a mouse is the most important thing. If that's bad then the mouse is ****, period.

Because it's quite easy to use, lots of features for a compact mouse, quality materials. When used for its intended market, it's a great product.

dagamer34 said,

Is there such a thing as an ergonomic travel mouse?

Maybe not, but with a $70 price tag, I would have expected their engineers to create exactly that... Its not like its impossible, its just that nobody has had an innovative idea yet.

darkpuma said,
Maybe not, but with a $70 price tag, I would have expected their engineers to create exactly that... Its not like its impossible, its just that nobody has had an innovative idea yet.

$70 is the retail label, I am sure it will be less than $50 on launch. I would personally never use it because of bad ergonomics. Those are essentially two mouse buttons cut off from a whole mouse!

I've been using Logitech mice exclusively for many years, I keep hoping M$ will offer more competitive products to counter things like the MX Anywhere and the like, but all I see are simple 2or3 button mice with interesting designs but hefty price tags. I guess the numbers support my thinking. People really DON'T want 5 or 6 button mice? really?

Hahaiah said,
I've been using Logitech mice exclusively for many years, I keep hoping M$ will offer more competitive products to counter things like the MX Anywhere and the like, but all I see are simple 2or3 button mice with interesting designs but hefty price tags. I guess the numbers support my thinking. People really DON'T want 5 or 6 button mice? really?

I like a big mouse with several buttons... I have a Microsoft Explorer Mouse at the moment and it's an awesome mouse.

I absolutely hate the Logitech software suite - it's unnecessarily bloated and feels clunky compared to IntelliPoint, which integrates nicely with the Mouse Control Panel - that said, Microsoft's new Mouse and Keyboard Centre appears to be much like SetPoint, which I guess is more for the sake of Windows 8 than anything.

Douglas_C said,

I like a big mouse with several buttons... I have a Microsoft Explorer Mouse at the moment and it's an awesome mouse.

I absolutely hate the Logitech software suite - it's unnecessarily bloated and feels clunky compared to IntelliPoint, which integrates nicely with the Mouse Control Panel - that said, Microsoft's new Mouse and Keyboard Centre appears to be much like SetPoint, which I guess is more for the sake of Windows 8 than anything.

Then you should go for the simple Logitech optical mice, 2 buttons + mousewheel. I have one for over 10 years and withstood countless hard encounters with the deskboard.. At work, the same (though newer) type of mice, for years.. They are exceptionally good and resilient.

I'm going to grab one for use with the Surface I think, which I think is their target scenario for this mouse... sitting down with a tablet, and using it like a laptop for more intense things.

Exactly, that's the point I tried to make in the review that those who commented without reading missed...it's a tablet companion, not a daily driver.

bdsams said,
Exactly, that's the point I tried to make in the review that those who commented without reading missed...it's a tablet companion, not a daily driver.

There are plenty of travel mice that are ergonomic to use. Labelling it as a travel mouse is no excuse for poor functional design.

$70 is a hell of a lot for something that isn't supposed to be used that often and will easily be lost as well.

FoxieFoxie said,
MS is becoming next Apple, design over ergonomics

is this the only "travel" mouse made by Microsoft? No
Keep trying with their other choices.

Ricardo Dawkins said,

is this the only "travel" mouse made by Microsoft? No
Keep trying with their other choices.

I bought Logitech Performance MX instead

Poor ergonomics should make any mouse get an extremely low review score. What's the point in a mouse that is uncomfortable - and in the long term, dangerous - to use?

what said,
Poor ergonomics should make any mouse get an extremely low review score. What's the point in a mouse that is uncomfortable - and in the long term, dangerous - to use?

Dangerous?

An expensive invite to Carpal Tunnel or RSI. My personal appeal to everyone on the internet:

Only go for a mouse which allows your entire palm to rest on it and which is feather light. Your muscles and nerves will forever thank you.

I personally use Microsoft basic optical mouse and can't be more happier.

drazgoosh said,
I think I prefer the Arc Mouse.

The ARC is fantastic. Well worth the price. At least the first gen. Im still using one that I bought a few years ago.

mrdumbass said,

The ARC is fantastic. Well worth the price. At least the first gen. Im still using one that I bought a few years ago.

Yeah, I LOVED the first gen Arc. The second gen I just didn't like ergonomically. Hopefully the third gen returns to the first gen's roots. LOL

grayscale said,
I would've appreciated this more if there are pictures or a video of the reviewer using it.

I'm currently traveling with the mouse, couldn't bring my tripod with me to film in the hotel room.

bdsams said,

I'm currently traveling with the mouse, couldn't bring my tripod with me to film in the hotel room.


Hopefully my comment didn't come out as offensive. I'm just curious as to how it looks when being used. That can wait.

grayscale said,

Hopefully my comment didn't come out as offensive. I'm just curious as to how it looks when being used. That can wait.

Not at all, I would have done it but filming a review on my Lumia 900 would have been a disaster, need a tripod with my DSLR to even attempt such a task.