Review

Review of the Synology DS414 NAS device

I'm a big advocate of backing up your files, whether it's to a device in your home, to a cloud provider, or hopefully to both. Most people usually don't think about backup copies until they have a disaster of some sort, and at that time it's usually too late. As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Today I'll take a look at the Synology DS414, a four-bay NAS device that promises a ton of storage to backup your files and also supports a wide range of applications so that it can act as a scaled down server in your home. Does it warrant a $480 price tag (without disks) though? I'll put the DS414 through its paces to help you decide if the device is for you.

One thing to note is that Synology does a great job naming their products so that it's easy to tell what you're buying. All of the DiskStation (NAS) devices start with the letters "DS." The first number after that is the number of drives the device supports -- in our case, it's 4. The last two numbers are the year the device was released, or 2014 in the case of the DS414. It's a pretty cool way to easily get information about the product you're buying.

Specifications

The DS414 sports the Marvell Armada XP dual-core CPU and has 1GB of RAM. The device has four hot-swappable drive bays and can support a maximum of 20TB of storage (4x5TB) in a JBOD configuration.

There are two Gigabit Ethernet ports on the back that support both link aggregation as well as Wake On LAN if your network supports these functions.

The device itself is 6.5 inches high, 8 inches wide, and 9.2 inches deep (165 mm X 203 mm X 233.2 mm), and weighs in at 4.45 pounds (2.02kg).

CPU Dual Core 1.33GHz Marvell Armada XP
Memory 1GB DDR3
Disk Capacity 20TB (4x5TB drives in JBOD) (Hot Swappable)
Network 2xGigabit Ethernet
USB Ports 2xUSB3 (back), 1xUSB2 (front)
Size(H/W/D) 6.5"/8"/9.2" (165 mm/203 mm/233.2 mm)
Weight 4.45 lbs (2.02 kg)

The front of the DS414 has six lights: One blue power light, and five green LED lights, one for each drive and one for the overall status of the device. These lights turn amber if there's an issue.

Hardware Installation

Connecting the Synology DS414 to your network is as easy as pie: Plug in the power and Ethernet cables, then press the power button on the front.

The best hardware feature of the DS414 is the tool-less disk trays. Instead of using screws, like many other manufacturers, Synology has disk sleds that simply click in to keep the disk in place. Place the disk in the sled, then click the two side pieces into place and the disk pack is ready to insert into the DS414. It's a great design, although I'm a little concerned that if the plastic clips on the side break you'll be out of luck and will have to contact Synology for a replacement.

It's worth noting that the device also supports WiFi if you want to purchase a third-party dongle. There's an extensive list of supported devices, but for most users it makes more sense to hardwire into your network.

The DS414 also supports recording TV directly to the storage using a supported DTV tuner. While I wasn't able to test this functionality, it's an interesting idea to try using the device as a DVR.

Configuration

The software is where the Synology DS414 starts to really shine. It has a level of polish and ease of use that I haven't seen in other NAS devices, making the device a pleasure to work with.

As soon as I logged into the device, it prompted me to upgrade to the latest version. That's a nice touch as opposed to other devices that expect you to go and find out if you're currently up to date. After clicking "yes" to the upgrade request, it went through the upgrade process and then automatically rebooted.

The entire process only took a few minutes and it was nice to know that I was running the most updated version of Synology's DiskStation Manager (DSM).

After upgrading the software, you need to create a volume so that you have a place to start storing your files. The Synology DS414 supports all of the standard RAID levels you would expect: JBOD, RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10. It also includes their own design called Synology Hybrid RAID - or SHR for short. For most home users, SHR is probably the best option to select because it adds greater flexibility than any of the traditional RAID counterparts.

In a nutshell, SHR acts like RAID 5, but also gives you the ability to replace disks with different sizes and not lose the space. With a traditional RAID 5, for example, if you lose a disk and put in a larger one, all of the extra space becomes wasted. With SHR, you'll be able to grow your volume by replacing disks with larger models.

Once you know what type of volume you want, the actual creation is handled by an extremely easy to use wizard and, like most of the wizards that Synology provides, the defaults will suit you well.

One thing I really liked about the volume creation was that it only took a couple of minutes before I was able to start using the volume, even though the entire process wasn't yet complete. Think of it like the "quick format" option you have in Windows. Even though the file system optimization phase takes an hour or so, you can start creating filesystems whenever you want.

Creating a new filesystem (shared folder) is just as simple as creating the volume, and if you aren't sure about the process, DSM helps steer you in the right direction without being obnoxious about it. When you open the "File Station" tool, which is prominently displayed on the desktop, you're informed that there are no shared folders and the operating system asks if you want to create one.

Once there, the process is as simple as typing in a name, an optional description, and deciding how visible you want the new filesystem to be. A second tab allows you to turn on file indexing, but since that's literally the only option on the tab I don't understand why it isn't just lumped into the main screen.

After creating the filesystem, you're brought to a menu that allows you fine tune the permissions. This is where you state who on your network is allowed access to the data, and it's very tunable. For most home installations, you'll probably want to give the guest account read access to a lot of your media to make streaming within your house easier.

Performance

Ease of use is great, that's not very important if the device doesn't perform well. Luckily, that's not something to worry about, as the Synology DS414 performed well in every test it went through.

The DS414 performed extremely well using the Intel NAS Performance Toolkit; in fact, it performed TOO well.  Although the FromNAS results were in-line with what we would expect, the ToNAS data was off the chart. We were routinely seeing anywhere from 250 to 910 MB/sec, results which are impossible with a single Gigabit network. We suspect this has to do with filesystem caching; indeed, the tool gave a warning that results might be skewed in systems with more than 2 gigabytes of memory.

Instead, we resorted to using Robocopy, a tool that's built into Windows 7. We also created a RAM disk using OSFMount in order to remove our own PC's disk I/O from the equation. Using this methodology to copy a single large file (like what the Intel tool does), we saw great results: 103 MB/sec while writing to the DS414, and 101 MB/sec while reading from the NAS. These results were nearly double what we saw from the DS212, and roughly 50% better than the Thecus N2310. However it's worth noting that this isn't really an apples to apples comparison, as the other two devices had only two spindles.

We expected to see great performance when copying a single file, as that's a relatively easy test. Next, we wanted to see what kind of speeds the DS414 provided when copying over a large number of very small files. We ended up taking 360 MP3 files of varying lengths that took roughly 3 gigabytes of space. Using Robocopy here, we still saw good performance: Copying to the NAS resulted in a respectable 40 MB/sec, while reading from the NAS gave us an even better 57 MB/sec. This is intuitive since every write to a RAID 5 volume requires an extra parity write. It's actually a little strange that we saw faster write times on the large file test, but the numbers were still very close.

Multiple users seemed to work fine as well as I frequently had multiple data streams going at once and while throughput was obviously reduced, I never had a crash.

Noise and Temperature

The Synology DS414 has two 92mm fans on the back that spin extremely quietly while still keeping the device cool. My office was a balmy 81F/27C, yet the hard drives reported temperatures ranging from 91F/33C to 97F/36C while under load.

While running the very unscientific sound meter from the SmartTools Android app, I recorded an average volume of 60 dB which was 5 dB quieter than the Thecus N2310, although neither device was particularly noisy while idle.

That said, when the disks were under heavy traffic, there was a definite different in pitch. Although it didn't register any louder, it was definitely more noticable than the N2310 (or the Synology DS212 for that matter) and while it wasn't terrible, it was mildly annoying.

Disk Recovery

One of the really cool features of the Synology DS414 is the fact that the disks are actually hot swappable. That means you can add and remove disks to the device without having to power it off first, something that's really handy when a drive fails.

I tested this by pulling a drive out while in the middle of a file copy. The file copy immediately paused while the DS414 figured out how to handle this error, but after a few seconds, it continued. The once-green status LED on the front of the box started flashing orange, a persistent beeping eminated from the box, and the web interface showed that the overall system health was "degraded." It's nice to see that a disk failure sends up so many alerts, especially considering most people who use this device will use either RAID-5 or Synology Hybrid RAID (SHR), and the loss of a second disk would be complete data loss.

After testing throughput on the degraded system, I went to put the system back together again and found this process incredibly simple. After plugging the drive back in, I simply clicked the "manage" button on the volume, and it brought up a wizard with "repair" as the only option. I clicked "next" a few times, confirming the defaults, and within a minute, the system stopped beeping and said that everything was back to normal.

It's worth noting that, although the system was completely functional, it took roughly 14 hours for the device to completely repair itself, spending most of the time in "Checking parity consistency" state. Performance was somewhat degraded during this time; see the performance section for more details.

Applications

One of the hallmarks of the Synology product line is that you can install many 1st and 3rd party tools to increase the functionality of the device. The DS414 is no different.

There's a wide variety of applications available, from multimedia streaming, to backup services, to web hosting, and even IP camera control. Each of the applications can be installed from the Package Center and can even be set to automatically update if so desired. One thing to note is that Plex is not a supported application on this device. When I  reached out to Synology, I was told that the application doesn't work as well with the ARM architecture.

Along those same lines, users who try to run many different packages at the same time may run into some performance bottlenecks due to the dual-core ARM processor. While running Audio Station, Video Station, streaming data from these packages, and copying files at the same time, we saw the CPU of the DS414 rise to a little over 80%. Although things still chugged along fine, we suspect that adding a webserver or database server to the mix would've brought the box to its knees. A quad-core Marvell ARMADA XP 1.6GHz processor would be a great way to give a little more breathing room to the DS414, although we suspect that would increase the price quite a bit as well.

There's too many applications to cover in this review, but suffice it to say there's something available for everyone and we hope to cover some of them in a future review.

In addition to installing packages on the DS414, Synology also has many apps you can install on your smartphone to interact with the device. The full range of apps are available for both Android and iPhone, and the company even has a smaller subset available for Windows Phone users, the latter missing only DS Cloud and DS cam. When I did the review of the DS412, the officially supported apps were lacking, to say the least. It's great to see how far they've come; the most recent update even has Chromecast support, something I'm personally a big fan of.

Conclusion

To sum it up, the Synology DS414 sports high capacity, excellent performance, easy to use hardware (including the ability to hot-swap drives, a complaint I had with the DS411), many additional applications to extend the functionality, and great mobile device support. What are the negatives? Well, the old saying "you get what you pay for" really comes true here, because the device retails for $479 without disks. I'm sure many of you will say, "I can build the same thing for cheaper," and from a pure hardware perspective you'd be right. However this is definitely a case where "the whole is greater than the sum of its parts." The Synology DS414 has a great base OS that supports hot-swapping drives. The additional applications blend into the usability seamlessly. And the Android applications allow you to enjoy all of your multimedia on the go, even allowing easy streaming to Chromecast. That's a tough blend of usability to replicate with a homebuilt server.

There really aren't many flaws with the Synology DS414. At first I assumed that 1 gigabyte of RAM wouldn't be enough, but we rarely saw the meter run above 30%. That said, the CPU is somewhat limiting if you want to take advantage of running a lot of packages at the same time. While I had no problem streaming audio and video while copying files at the same time, doing much more than that would have really made the box sweat. A quad-core ARM processor would be a nice addition.

In addition, if I had to nitpick, the front USB port is only USB2, and that there's no single button to press to copy the contents of a USB drive to the Synology DS414. That said, that's not really a feature I'd use much anyway so this is a really minor issue for the sake of coming up with an issue.

If you're looking for a simple NAS device to store files and nothing more, you can probably find cheaper solutions out there. If you want a device that will be the central multimedia hub for your entire house, in addition to storing files, then you can't go wrong with the DS414.

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54 Comments

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sinetheo said,
A single ssd can outperform this. Has are soo last decade

I could put SSD's in my NAS and performance wouldn't change at all. It's about storage, NOT performance.

Until I can source 3TB SSD's for the same cost of their mechanical counterparts, why waste money on them? SSD's would only be suitable for large Enterprise users.

sinetheo said,
A single ssd can outperform this. Has are soo last decade

When you find a single SSD that can store 6TB of data and can support the loss of a single drive without more than a blip, let me know. ;)

SSD's are sexy, don't get us wrong, but you are way off-base on this. We're talking backup, server based storage for files and multimedia applications, not gaming stuff.

"That's the thing, the reason for the current limit at 20TB is unknown."

Well it only has 4 bays. The most you can have with current HD technology is 4 x 4TB drives which gives you 16GB.

As far as I am aware there are not any 5TB drives on the market. And who would want 5TB drives anyway? I'd rather have a higher number of lower capacity drives.

Steve121178 said,
As far as I am aware there are not any 5TB drives on the market. And who would want 5TB drives anyway? I'd rather have a higher number of lower capacity drives.

Both Seagate and Toshiba are selling 5TB drives and the former has even released a 6TB drive last month. Also, what you would rather have may not be the same as what I or others would rather have. Since this Synology NAS is not expandable HDD slot-wise, larger HDDs are the only way to increase capacity within a single unit.

Ok, but why would you use 5/6TB drives in a NAS? That's crazy. If you needed around 20TB, performance would be much better with a larger enclosure & more drives.

And remember, even if you had 4 x 6TB drives, you would only have half that available for use assuming you chose Synology's RAID technology (SHR).

Steve121178 said,
Ok, but why would you use 5/6TB drives in a NAS? That's crazy. If you needed around 20TB, performance would be much better with a larger enclosure & more drives.

And remember, even if you had 4 x 6TB drives, you would only have half that available for use assuming you chose Synology's RAID technology (SHR).

Which is why, if I had to go for a Synology box right now, I would probably choose DS2413+. It has 12 drive slots, so I can either have higher quantity of drives with lower capacity or fewer drives of higher capacity. I also realise that some capacity will be sacrificed for the purpose of safety, but it is a price that I am willing to pay.

Huh? With only 4 bays, how could you expect more than that? They'd have to release drives of at least 5TB a pop to reach that limit with a JBOD or Raid 0 setup, higher if you use any form of redundancy. Drives top out at 4TB currently.

Besides, I'm sure that if larger drives do become available that make the possible maximum capacity higher than 20TB, then Synology will update their software to support those higher capacities. Anyhow I'm sure it's more to do with supporting the current max capacity of the drives rather than there being any kind of hard limit.

That's the thing, the reason for the current limit at 20TB is unknown. If I want to use RAID6 and this is a hard limit as opposed to a soft one that will be increased once drives of higher capacity are released, I will be stuffed at 10TB of usable capacity.

vanx said,
That's the thing, the reason for the current limit at 20TB is unknown. If I want to use RAID6 and this is a hard limit as opposed to a soft one that will be increased once drives of higher capacity are released, I will be stuffed at 10TB of usable capacity.

It should be software based -- meaning once the 6TB (and higher) drives come out in the mainstream, Synology can patch the OS to accept them. I've seen press releases from various NAS vendors recently announcing that they now support the 5TB disks that are on the market, so I'm sure it's not a problem for any of the vendors.

Fezmid said,
It should be software based -- meaning once the 6TB (and higher) drives come out in the mainstream, Synology can patch the OS to accept them. I've seen press releases from various NAS vendors recently announcing that they now support the 5TB disks that are on the market, so I'm sure it's not a problem for any of the vendors.

I prefer not to make any assumptions until they actually do it, especially since they are under no obligation to.

vanx said,

I prefer not to make any assumptions until they actually do it, especially since they are under no obligation to.

That's fair. But your RAID cards probably don't explicitly support hardware that doesn't exist yet either. ;)

Fezmid said,
That's fair. But your RAID cards probably don't explicitly support hardware that doesn't exist yet either. ;)

What does not exist? As mentioned to Steve121178, you can buy 5 and 6TB drives already.

Seems that you require Ferrari features from a top of the line Alfa Romeo. Either wait until Synology enables compatibility or go find a more suitable PRO solution I would say...

EddieZe said,
Seems that you require Ferrari features from a top of the line Alfa Romeo. Either wait until Synology enables compatibility or go find a more suitable PRO solution I would say...

It just so happens that Synology do do a NAS solution with higher current maximum capacity, so if this one stays at 20TB it will not affect me.

vanx said,
you can buy 5 and 6TB drives already.

I think our definitions of "you can buy" are slightly different my friend :) I've just done a rather unscientific check on several computer component stores online searching for the terms 5TB and 6TB (I assumed the listings would follow the same naming convention as every other drive capacity below 5TB), and found no results.

Are they actually available to buy? Or are we talking pre-orders? Or worse than that, have they merely been announced as "coming soon"?

The point is, that at the time this NAS was designed, the highest drive capacity that existed (as in available, to buy, at that time) were 4TB. They built in a margin of future proofing by offering official support for 5TB drives. So I'm really not sure why we're here debating this, when you've also just admitted that this limit wont affect you anyway ;)

Update, for fairness: I've just found two places stocking the "5TB Enterprise 3.5in SATA 6Gb/s Desktop Hard Drive", but at over £300 a pop! They're also marketed as enterprise class drives, not really a class match for a SOHO NAS device. In the UK at least, Seagate's own website only lists two resellers of the 5TB drive, none for the 6TB drive. I'm sure it would be more cost effective to get a NAS with more bays and smaller drives, than go with a 4 and pay over £1200 just for enterprise class drives!

http://www.dabs.com/products/s...F.html?q=seagate&src=16
http://www.ebuyer.com/639071-5...top-hard-drive-st5000nm0024

Edited by Ryster, May 31 2014, 11:28am :

For example, in the USA, 6TB drives are available: http://www.newegg.com/Product/...%20600490667&IsNodeId=1

I was merely making a comment that current maximum capacity of this NAS does not meet my requirements. This does not make it a bad NAS solution overall -- and it looks like a few few people are happy with theirs -- it just does not tick my boxes. Can we agree to put it to bed now? Pretty please?

Good question. The honest answer is that's what I had to test with. I'm also a little skeptical that there's much difference between them; I've had green drives in my Windows Home Server and it's been running along fine for about 5 years, so...

I have the Reds in my NAS. I think the Reds run quieter and are somehow optimised for NAS use.

I don't think there's much difference to be honest, but after purchasing 2 x 3TB Red WD drives for my NAS I wouldn't hesitate in buying more of them in the future. They do exactly what they claim to do which is good enough for me.

"Green" drives should NEVER be used in a RAID array. They are more prone to spinning down faster than "Black" or even the new "Red" drives. Which means SMART status will be tripped faster thus ejecting the drive from the array.

I screwed up and ordered these "Green" drives for my Synology NAS (5 bay model) and had 3 drives die withen 4 years of use. Two got replaced under warranty the third I had to buy a replacement. Thankfully I used RAID6 so I could loose 2 drives before the array was gone. After doing some reading I came across some articles saying some of these drives actually say to not use them in a NAS/RAID situation.

When I bought my two 5 drive expansion modules for my NAS I filled them with Seagate Enterprise class drives not wanting this crap to happen again.

necrosis said,
"Green" drives should NEVER be used in a RAID array. They are more prone to spinning down faster than "Black" or even the new "Red" drives. Which means SMART status will be tripped faster thus ejecting the drive from the array.

I screwed up and ordered these "Green" drives for my Synology NAS (5 bay model) and had 3 drives die withen 4 years of use. Two got replaced under warranty the third I had to buy a replacement. Thankfully I used RAID6 so I could loose 2 drives before the array was gone. After doing some reading I came across some articles saying some of these drives actually say to not use them in a NAS/RAID situation.

When I bought my two 5 drive expansion modules for my NAS I filled them with Seagate Enterprise class drives not wanting this crap to happen again.

the problem with green drives is parking, they just park in less time then red ones; it's ok in a consumer device but in RAID it's pretty bad; i stay away from them.

The so-called "Green" drives are watered down in just more than power saving. They use less RAM caching, the timing is more relaxed, and not as stringent as what you would get with high- or mid-level drives.

I run a DS414 (TITAN) with 4 4TB Connies (Seagate Constellations ST4000NM033) giving me a whopping backup span of 11TB in the Hybrid mode. I got both Ethernet jacks busy, one is connected to my NW, but the other is directly connected to my Prime system using a 10.xx.xx.xx subnet for that link, eliminating any bottlenecks.

My other NAS drives are DS211 (Memory Alpha) and DS212 (Memory Delta), both still in production as multimedia and software storage. Both of those units run Seagates (ST2000DM001), those models are one step below the Constellation family.

Never NEVER run green drives in any RAID or mission critical applications. I don't care if they are sitting on the shelf gathering dust. Use them in standalone or auxiliary applications, either be external or internal installations. Do NOT trust them with valuable software or files, they can and will bite you HARD.

Invest in good quality drives and they will reward you with a good lifespan, and if something should befall them, a good warranty to replace them.

If the reviewer used Connies or Re4 WD's, his benchmarks would be completely different, as in much, much faster times.

Heheh, how'd you guess?

Oh and Titan is just that; It's got HUGE storage so it's a decent namesake. It was either that or naming it CHALLENGER...

Nighthawke said,
Heheh, how'd you guess?

Oh and Titan is just that; It's got HUGE storage so it's a decent namesake. It was either that or naming it CHALLENGER...

as soon as i saw Memory Alpha and Memory Delta... :D

I've got a DS213+ which serves me well. Have 2x 3TB drives in it running Raid 0, with an external 2TB USB drive to backup important data every weekend. My only criticism is that the. CPU could be a bit more powerful. When transcoding with Serviio, it doesn't quite keep up with 1080p videos in MKV format. You have to start the video, then pause it and let the CPU chew on it for a few minutes to build up enough of a buffer. A faster CPU would fix this.

Maybe a DS214+ or DS214play would have a better CPU.

IMO, that USB backup is a poor gamble. Once upon a time, I did run USB backups until one spat the bit not two months in production. I tore it down, discovering it had a green label HD in it, the lowest of the model line. After that I spent good coin setting up my 2 drive NAS arrays and my crowning achievement, a 4 bay 16TB DS414 that goes by the name of Titan. I never looked back since.

I'm not claiming USB drives are infallible, but the chances of both the NAS and USB drive failing at the same time are very much reduced in comparison to either one failing on its own. It's all about playing the odds.

Synology's big plus point is their UI, it's amazing for a web UI.. I want to get one of the 5 Drive models but it's going to cost me $1,800 with drives so that's on hold for the moment *lol*

I have exactly that NAS device and its the best NAS system ive ever used, great performance, great software / functionaility, i think it's rather quiet too. Can't recommend it enough

REM2000 said,
I have exactly that NAS device and its the best NAS system ive ever used, great performance, great software / functionaility, i think it's rather quiet too. Can't recommend it enough

Yeah, complaining about the noise is a bit of a stretch; it just sounds a little weird to me when all the drives are going. :)

totally agree, i think some of it comes from the kinds of drives, i have some pretty noisy samsungs in there, i reckon when i save up enough to replace them with greens it'll be even quieter than it is now, i barely hear the fan on it and thats with maxing out the CPU and copying files.

Nice review. I took a hard look at these last year and with a dozen drives, some of smaller size, I just couldn't justify the price, the features offered a lot of stuff I'll never use but was nice to have and was missing a few I wanted.

I ended up using a software solution called "Flexraid" and haven't looked back.

If you arnt tech savvy enough to build your own pc you can get EOL 8 bay enterprise NAS devices off ebay for 80 bucks. If you are tech savvy you can add a 20$ HP P400 to any pc and get RAID6 for up to 8 drives.

If you like paying more for much much less however, Synology is a good choice. RAID 5 on 5TB drives with no battery backed cache... Cant see any problem there... Not. At least you can install flappy bird on it though.

Edited by TPreston, May 27 2014, 9:08am :

TPreston said,
RAID 5 on 5TB drives with no battery backed cache... Can't see any problem there... Not. At least you can install flappy bird on it though.

You could buy a UPS to make up for the lack of a BBWC or FBWC though.

TPreston said,
If you arnt tech savvy enough to build your own pc you can get EOL 8 bay enterprise NAS devices off ebay for 80 bucks. If you are tech savvy you can add a 20$ HP P400 to any pc and get RAID6 for up to 8 drives.

If you like paying more for much much less however, Synology is a good choice. RAID 5 on 5TB drives with no battery backed cache... Cant see any problem there... Not. At least you can install flappy bird on it though.


What enterprise-level NAS device are you talking about for $80? I might be interesting in writing a story about building one and comparing it to the other devices I've reviewed.

That said, I still don't think it'd be anywhere near the same. First of all, in my experience, you have to pay for licenses to run the older stuff. Some of them may not require it, but if so, you have no support - and therefore no upgrades. That could be a problem running outdated software.

Second, you need to know a lot more about storage. Managing a Netapp filer is completely different than managing the Synology.

Third, you lose the ease of use of packages and mobile apps. Good luck streaming something from your enterprise NAS device to your Chromecast or your phone without extra software and hacking.

Interesting article on RAID 5 though. Not sure if I believe it though; it was written in 2007, and it's now 2014 and I haven't really heard a lot about this "issue." I should dig into it a little and see how real a problem it is though, thanks for the link.

"What enterprise-level NAS device are you talking about for $80?"

Look on ebay there's loads of eol storage devices from 14 bay SAS expanders to plain old NAS

"but if so, you have no support - and therefore no upgrades. That could be a problem running outdated software."

That would be an issue if you wanted to install angry birds on it, However these devices are for storage not for pathetic mobile "apps". If they managed 5+ years storing critical data I think they can handle some home movies.

"Second, you need to know a lot more about storage. Managing a Netapp filer is completely different than managing the Synology."

I didn't suggest a netapp filer, I suggested an enterprise RAID card for 20 bucks that can do RAID6 with up to 8 drives.

"Third, you lose the ease of use of packages and mobile apps. Good luck streaming something from your enterprise NAS device to your Chromecast or your phone without extra software and hacking."

True that, Id suggest a HTPC for that.

TPreston said,
That would be an issue if you wanted to install angry birds on it, However these devices are for storage not for pathetic mobile "apps". If they managed 5+ years storing critical data I think they can handle some home movies.

I'm not sure why you keep saying "Angry birds." That's NOT the type of application that you install on a Synology device. The review clearly states you can install things like audio/video tools (to ease streaming around your house), IP camera control, automated backup solutions (you can backup from one Synology to another, automatically), and things like that. We're not talking about games, we're talkinga bout things that really increase the use of the device.

Fezmid said,

I'm not sure why you keep saying "Angry birds." That's NOT the type of application that you install on a Synology device. The review clearly states you can install things like audio/video tools (to ease streaming around your house), IP camera control, automated backup solutions (you can backup from one Synology to another, automatically), and things like that. We're not talking about games, we're talkinga bout things that really increase the use of the device.

I say it in a disparaging way comparing these toy like applications to angry birds because compared to even free backup/audio video etc they are just that. And this is meant to be the saving grace of these over priced lacklustre devices... fail.

I could also buy an EOL school bus off eBay and transport 40 children, but then I have to do extensive bus maintenance when instead I could just buy a minivan.

Plus, the minivan comes with Angry Birds.

Fezmid said,

Interesting article on RAID 5 though. Not sure if I believe it though; it was written in 2007, and it's now 2014 and I haven't really heard a lot about this "issue." I should dig into it a little and see how real a problem it is though, thanks for the link.

The problem is mostly down to the number of bits its having to rebuild so with 4 drives that 3 drives and a lot of bits to be fine when doing a rebuild. With 2TB drives there is a lot to go wrong.

TPreston said,

I say it in a disparaging way comparing these toy like applications to angry birds because compared to even free backup/audio video etc they are just that. And this is meant to be the saving grace of these over priced lacklustre devices... fail.

wait, you think Synology's apps are lakcluster? Have you even tried the device? their video survalience system is pretty top notch for the cost. Heck being able to watch many IP HD cameras and record them, even do fish eye cameras with motion detection / tracking isn't some junky little app..

Enron said,
Yes, Scientology makes good products.

Was that on purpose, or an autocorrect blunder? Lol

DS414+ Tom Cruise Edition ;-(