RIAA laying off staff, 'it's a bloodbath' says source

Hypebot reports that the RIAA is in the midst of laying off a significant portion of their staff. They quote one anonymous source as saying, "It is about 90-100+ people across the US and global offices--anti-piracy, coordinated IFPI/BPI etc--trust me it's a bloodbath."

The same source claims the RIAA will make an official announcement next week and goes on to state that the RIAA will be uniting with the BPI (the British Phonographic Industry--the British version of the RIAA) and the IFPI (the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry--the body involved in the current Pirate Bay trial now taking place in Sweden and being followed, among other places, here at Neowin).

Digital Music News claims the number of RIAA staff being let go is more in the range of 30. Even though the RIAA has not released the exact number, RIAA representative Cara Duckworth said, "I can confirm there were layoffs. As you can imagine, the music community is not immune from the impact of these tough economic times."

Techdirt speculates that it will not be long before we hear that the staff cuts were due to file-sharing. But, they write, "The real issue is that the RIAA has basically managed to run one of the dumbest, most self-defeating strategies over the last decade. Rather than helping major record labels adjust to the changing market, it continually, repeatedly and publicly destroyed its own reputation and the reputation of the labels--each time shrinking their potential market by blaming the very people they should have been working to turn into customers."

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I bet they all start sharing their files as a protest.

I can see it now, all those articles about how much shame they feel and for a fee they will snitch on whoever.

The business model is right in front of them.

Similar situation:

Nintendo is making a killing right now off of releasing emulated old ROMS. This is something that has been on the net for years FOR FREE.

100 people get let off and it's a bloodbath? Christ, there are a 1000's of people being laid off on any given day, what kind of bath is that?

toadeater said,
They need to take the MPAA and FCC with them.

FCC is a part of the US Government, I don't see that one happening anytime soon:)

I think the person who said "that anybody who works for the RIAA isn't human"

I quite agree... The RIAA and it's partners are sucessful failures, like getting blood from a stone.
They get what they deserve, I can only hope their lives become a living hell, just like the innocent people they prosicuted.

LOL , maybe now they can get job at the parking enforcement... they will just as much appetiated

they day they all lose they jobs i trow a party

Tough economic times may harm the music industry, but the musicians will keep playing tunes and the poets will keep writing no matter. That's why we don't need the RIAA and the industry.

To quote my self from another thread:

All dinosaurs must die.
Music, art, film, will never die. The industry as we know it today (or more like yesterday) will. But the arts will prevail. This war is not mainly fought by the artists, but by their "pimps"...

For a time, we might have to suffer a loss in quality in the fields that are hit by piracy. But the marked for these products is still there, and where there is a market, there is profit to be made. Its just the structure that has to change

"The real issue is that the RIAA has basically managed to run one of the dumbest, most self-defeating strategies over the last decade. Rather than helping major record labels adjust to the changing market, it continually, repeatedly and publicly destroyed its own reputation and the reputation of the labels--each time shrinking their potential market by blaming the very people they should have been working to turn into customers."

This. In a nutshell.

They've had 10+ years to come up with a strategy. They didn't.

It's worse than that, actually: other people practically came up with the strategy for them. All they had to do was figure out how to link it to a payment processor. They couldn't even do that, but Apple did it for them with great success. Yet despite that they seem to fight with Apple rather frequently and threaten to pull their wares from the iTunes Music Store... it's really amazing how some of the rich upper management managed to get to where they are, and even more amazing that they're able to stay there.

cycro said,
Now they'll blame piracy for having to lay off staff due to a decrease in profits.

Interesting, I was thinking the same thing

atleast we will now know more from the inside of those stupid companies, the former workers will gladly report how it was to work for those employees. It's going to be fun reading.
Anyways, don't feel a pitty sorry about them losing those imaginary jobs

Everyone is like MPAA are evil and we hope they die but hardly no one commented on the really bad news.

The Anti-Anti-Copywrite factions are joining togeather.

smooth_criminal1990 said,
And for some reason, I always seem to read phonographic as pornographic...maybe that's just me :P


Not just you.

dead.cell said,
Whoever they got working against TPB should probably be let go if they have any intention of winning...


no definately not human. like the bad company in Max Payne. :P nothing short of organized crime.

"As you can imagine, the music community is not immune from the impact of these tough economic times."

So they have been doing business as usual all this time? weren't they struggling already due to piracy? freeking amazing.

I'd even say with the methods they're generally using, there's next to no difference from other mafia-like organisations.
For e.g., these mass mailings of threatened law suits to individuals are really no different than the extortion of money for "protection" done by mafia-like organisations.

As such I can only say, "Good riddance!"
The less of them there are, the better.