RIAA sponsored web theft bill passed in Tennessee

If you live in Tennessee and share your login credentials for Netflix, watch out. The Associated Press is reporting that State lawmakers in the home to country music have passed a bill that would make it illegal to share login credentials. The measure was originally designed to prevent thieves from selling login credentials in bulk for services such as Netflix, iTunes, and Rhapsody.

The bill, which is now law after being signed by the governor, is an attempt to curtail what the music and movie industry describes as billions of dollars lost yearly to illegal sharing of media. Creators of the bill acknowledge that it may have consequences for the everyday user though. This did not stop the recording and movie industry officials from pushing the bill through.

Officials are insisting that this would not have any affects on people within the same household that use another’s account to watch movies via services such as Netflix, but people who live in dormitories, or apartments who share outside of their immediate family may be targeted by this law.

Offenders that share $500 or less would face a misdemeanor charge with a fine of up to $2,500 and / or a year in jail. Offenders that go over $500 could face grand theft charges, which could mean more serious consequences.

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31 Comments

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Live in Tennessee, get what you deserve. You'd think those toothless hicks in that state would have something better to do with their lives...like enforcing laws against knocking up your sister. Of course, they do that and their population drops dangerously.

DewCheat said,
Live in Tennessee, get what you deserve. You'd think those toothless hicks in that state would have something better to do with their lives...like enforcing laws against knocking up your sister. Of course, they do that and their population drops dangerously.

lol

DewCheat said,
Live in Tennessee, get what you deserve. You'd think those toothless hicks in that state would have something better to do with their lives...like enforcing laws against knocking up your sister. Of course, they do that and their population drops dangerously.

You seem awfully bitter about something here... were you by chance a product of said unions?

SirEvan said,
good lord....just goes to show you how dumb lawmakers are. I hate all things politics.

yep. just goes to show they are in the pockets of the rich more than looking out for the citizen's. you can't trust politicians as the majority i would think are corrupted.

but the thing is... can they really enforce this stuff? (it don't seem like it would be easy unless they made it sort of a grey area just enough to where they can use scare tactics to try to bully people into stopping?)

or maybe they just go by how many IP's are logged on at same time? , but even that seems like it would be hard to prove in court that someone else is using it (outside of your immediate family) unless you got LOTS of IP's logging in at same time.

p.s. o well, all the more reason to use 'alternate sources' that are much better than netflix and about the same price without any of the BS

Edited by ThaCrip, Jun 2 2011, 9:51pm :

I think this law is really fing stupid and Governor Bill Haslam and the RIAA can kiss my ass. I know one thing I'm vote dem or for who ever hell runs against this sorry sob in next Governor election.

casper2 said,
I think this law is really fing stupid and Governor Bill Haslam and the RIAA can kiss my ass. I know one thing I'm vote dem or for who ever hell runs against this sorry sob in next Governor election.

yes, why should a company expect to have people buy their product when one person can pay for it, and 30+ copies/log-ins can be shared with friends... sheesh. when did this 'I hate things that don't let me and my extended family/friends steal' become so pervasive?

If you want a service, music, movie, etc. buy the thing, or whatever, but to have stealing become the de facto thought process for people is amazing and sad at the same time.

Skin said,

yes, why should a company expect to have people buy their product when one person can pay for it, and 30+ copies/log-ins can be shared with friends... sheesh. when did this 'I hate things that don't let me and my extended family/friends steal' become so pervasive?

If you want a service, music, movie, etc. buy the thing, or whatever, but to have stealing become the de facto thought process for people is amazing and sad at the same time.

Small government my ass. You guys talk the talk but walk an entirely different walk. Go legislate your own lives.

Skin said,

yes, why should a company expect to have people buy their product when one person can pay for it, and 30+ copies/log-ins can be shared with friends... sheesh. when did this 'I hate things that don't let me and my extended family/friends steal' become so pervasive?

If you want a service, music, movie, etc. buy the thing, or whatever, but to have stealing become the de facto thought process for people is amazing and sad at the same time.

So my newspaper subscription is only for me to read, no one else in my household? What about a rented Library book? Where does it stop, or where will it stop?

shakey said,

So my newspaper subscription is only for me to read, no one else in my household? What about a rented Library book? Where does it stop, or where will it stop?

oh please... a library book? Is there a product bought there? Is there even a license you agree to not pass it around? There isn't in my neck of the woods.

As for the paper, I believe that the newspaper subscription is per 'household' in most places, I know mine is here, as it is assigned by address. If you were to pass it around to your entire block, then yes, that would be stealing from the company that produces them in your area.

Perhaps you missed "Officials are insisting that this would not have any affects on people within the same household that use another's account..."

This is dealing with passing things to extended family/friends/etc etc. Stealing is stealing, whether people want to agree with the moral ramifications, or accept the title of thief.


Skin said,

This is dealing with passing things to extended family/friends/etc etc. Stealing is stealing, whether people want to agree with the moral ramifications, or accept the title of thief.

Where's the theft here? It's called sharing...

If someone lends me their netflix login and I stream a movie, what have I stolen?

If the record and movie companies had their way, they would charge you every single time you listened to, or watched anything they sold you.

Let me guess, you probably also disagree with Amazons cloud music service, just like your buddies the RIAA?

Soulsiphon said,

Small government my ass. You guys talk the talk but walk an entirely different walk. Go legislate your own lives.

So to be consistent with "small government" philosophy means stealing is OK.

Just when i though that the term "ridiculous" had been challenged and redefined by the RIAA and MPAA, here we go again.

Well, that means ill have to stop lending dvd's and cd's from/to my friends and family. Dont want to make criminals of them.

Also, i think ill stop listening to the radio altogether. Dont want to break the law by listening content that i didnt pay for.

Also, come to think of it, i dont pay for Pandora or Last.fm, so ill stop using them too. You Can never be too carefull, and i want to be a law abiding citizen. Let me also clear the hd of my dvr, as i also think that content is stored there illegally.

And finally, i guess ill destroy the cd's/digital backups i made from the original Beatles/Hendrix lp's my dad owned, seeing as the originals where damaged and discarded.

Yep. Ridiculous.

Mr.Ed

This is stupid. What happens if you have a dynamic IP? Will you get arrested for "sharing" when in reality your IP is changing because of your ISP?

Jimmy422 said,
This is stupid. What happens if you have a dynamic IP? Will you get arrested for "sharing" when in reality your IP is changing because of your ISP?

I think it more has to when 2 or more different IP's are connected to the service using the same Account (IE netflix running 2 or more times at the same time from different locations with the same account.) since they allow more then 1 device to be activated.

WolvesHunt said,

I think it more has to when 2 or more different IP's are connected to the service using the same Account (IE netflix running 2 or more times at the same time from different locations with the same account.) since they allow more then 1 device to be activated.

What about accidentally running netflix on both my phone on 3G and my ps3 for example? (not that I have netflix at all, lol)? 2 different IPs, same time.

Jimmy422 said,
This is stupid. What happens if you have a dynamic IP? Will you get arrested for "sharing" when in reality your IP is changing because of your ISP?

It dosen't work that way they still know who is who by your (Ethernet, Token Ring, 802.11, Bluetooth, FDDI, ATM, SCSI, and Fibre Channel) Network Interface Controller Card (ISDN, DLS, Cable Modem, Router, (Wi-Fi) Wireless Adapter Card all have some kind of hardware mac address buildin unless your on 56k dial up then there MAC addresses are "virtual" network mac adapters tired to true a hardware mac addresses on ISP end and even then the ISP know who is who logon.

SHS said,

It dosen't work that way they still know who is who by your (Ethernet, Token Ring, 802.11, Bluetooth, FDDI, ATM, SCSI, and Fibre Channel) Network Interface Controller Card (ISDN, DLS, Cable Modem, Router, (Wi-Fi) Wireless Adapter Card all have some kind of hardware mac address buildin unless your on 56k dial up then there MAC addresses are "virtual" network mac adapters tired to true a hardware mac addresses on ISP end and even then the ISP know who is who logon.

MAC addresses are at layer 2 of the TCP/IP stack and are changed with each device the packet goes through, so the MAC that a PHP log recieves will be that of the router or network switch that passed the packet through last to the web server.
Also, phones have MAC addresses ONLY for wifi, when using internet over 3G or whatnot, the first MAC address it gets is that of thw web proxy at the ISP/phone company

Jimmy422 said,
This is stupid. What happens if you have a dynamic IP? Will you get arrested for "sharing" when in reality your IP is changing because of your ISP?

Could I get in trouble if I'm watching it at home and my sister is watching at her friends house?

thatguyandrew1992 said,

Could I get in trouble if I'm watching it at home and my sister is watching at her friends house?

Technically, yes. Although I wouldn't think they would pursue just two logins at the same time.

...measure was originally designed to prevent thieves from selling login credentials in bulk for services such as Netflix, iTunes, and Rhapsody....

But, could be in the future, used for any sort of account sharing (aka 2 ppl in the same home despite there assurances), since it seems vague enough to target who they want, when they want.