Roku celebrates 5 million users and 8 billion video streams

Roku, the Internet-connected set top box, have announced that they have over 5 million users (or "players") who have streamed over 8 billion pieces of video in five years. That means that each Roku user has streamed 1,600 pieces of video content over five years. The original Roku device was launched in 2008 and was called "the Netflix player," as Netflix was one of the first streaming services to realise the potential in Roku. In 2009 Amazon partnered with Roku to introduce their "Video on Demand" service, which has over 140,000 films and TV shows. HBO partnered with Roku in 2011, bringing many popular TV shows, like Game of Thrones, to the Roku. Just this year, Time Warner Cable partnered with Roku to provide over 300 TV channels. Roku now have around 750 channels in total, up from the one they had five years ago. 

Spotify, VEVO and Pandora are also available on Roku, and have helped contribute to the gigantic 8 billion streams figure. Roku also supports Angry Birds, which debuted in 2011 with the launch of "casual games" on the platform. By Roku's measurements, over 3 billion pigs have been eliminated on Angry Birds. 

A quarter of Roku users stream more than 35 hours of video per week to a TV, an hour above the average amount of time spent watching live TV (34 hours according to Neilsen). According to Anthony Wood, Roku founder and CEO, that makes Roku one of the most "coveted streaming platforms." 

Roku have created an infographic to highlight their path over the past five years: 

Source: Roku | Image via Roku

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14 Comments

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I had a question about the Roku that no salesman could answer and I never wanted to buy one without knowing....

Does it have a SDHC card slot so you can just use it to play your own files ?

ShareShiz said,
I had a question about the Roku that no salesman could answer and I never wanted to buy one without knowing....

Does it have a SDHC card slot so you can just use it to play your own files ?

I have the Roku XS, and it has Micro SD slot on it. When I got my Roku, there were a few apps to play music off it, never really tried video from it. It was a real pain to unplug the hdmi cable and fiddle with it to get the memory card out and then put it back.
It really isn't meant for that, but rather more space to install games and channels on if you run out of space.

Roku is so tiny, quite, doesn't require much power at all, and since has a Bluetooth remote and wifi I have just hidden it behind the TV.

ShareShiz said,
I had a question about the Roku that no salesman could answer and I never wanted to buy one without knowing....

Does it have a SDHC card slot so you can just use it to play your own files ?

Nothing beats WDTV Live Hub for home streaming, the Roku has the Micro SD card, however many video formats are not supported, WDTV Hub opens pretty much anything you throw at it.

I have a Roku, certainly the best online media streamer out there, however for home streaming I prefer the WDTV Live Hub any time.

I got a Roku 3 last month and Love it so much i went over my Data limit of 250GB 12 days before my bill was due .

so sadly i had to cancel my netflix .

how are we suppose to enjoy netflix when our cable company screws us on data

i have the worst cable in the world ( Mediacom )

TurboShrimp said,
I got a Roku 3 last month and Love it so much i went over my Data limit of 250GB 12 days before my bill was due .

so sadly i had to cancel my netflix .

how are we suppose to enjoy netflix when our cable company screws us on data

i have the worst cable in the world ( Mediacom )

Ahh but that's the idea. Screw you from using Netflix but offer you a cable tv package.
Who get the profit?

ShareShiz said,
Damn that sucks.

Most companies have "unlimited" b/w, but 250gbs in 12 days is a ****-ton of data though.

Yeah I watch about 5-6 Csi Miami episodes a night in HD I think if I set it to good and not HD I could have saved half the data . I may try that in a moth or so.

SK[ said,]Never heard of the unit which makes sense as the graphic above suggests its a US only product?

Not a US only product. I've had one in the UK for over 2 years now. Paired with Roku's own media streaming services, such as Netflix as well as the Plex App, I have on archive some 200+ DVDs in my collection with a nice Roku Netflix style menu, with all the meta information about each movie. Really is great. If you rip the DVDs properly too, you can stream them direct to the Roku from consumer NAS box too.

and now no one cares about privacy.. since it seems it knows something to the exact number in the whole US. what if the device records everything you do? ;o Oh wait it actually does.

Geranium_Z__NL said,
and now no one cares about privacy.. since it seems it knows something to the exact number in the whole US. what if the device records everything you do? ;o Oh wait it actually does.

Thing is, if we take a anti-piracy stance in the same way the media companies do. 1,600 streams per user on the Roku means the Roku has stopped 1,600 video's from being pirated! That's probably more then most people have pirated anyway so far.

Of course, the same pirates probably wouldn't have paid for the content anyway, but that's a different issue.

As for the Roku box recording everything you do.. You have to understand that the Roku box is very simple in the way it works. Apps, or rather Channels (such as Netflix) on the Roku are quite simple scripts that tell the box element layouts and does some simple scripting for buttons. The rest is handled on the web server, so it's quite easy to count how many times a video has been requested from the webserver logs. This isn't the roku device itself, as any of the streaming services can log their own websites that are holding the videos.

I'm going to assume Roku has requested numbers from Netflix, crackle etc and just compiled them together... and that might not be the overall picture, but it's a good guess at the services it provides by stock. I say that, because PlexApp streams content from your local network provided by the end users, and Roku doesn't have access to them records (at least they've not asked me).