Rumor: First Ultrabooks to start mass producing in September

Last May at Computex, processor maker Intel first announced and showed off the hardware concept design for the Ultrabook, a thin and light notebook that offers up more hardware power and features than the traditional "netbook". The Ultrabook design seems to have caught on, at least according to one report. A new Digitimes story reports that a number of PC makers will be releasing notebooks using Intel's Ultrabook design concept later this fall. The article, which uses unnamed sources, says that the companies involved will begin mass producing the first Ultrabooks in September.

Companies that have signed on to make Ultrabooks include the biggest in the business such as HP, Dell, Acer, Levono, and Asus. In fact the article claims that Asus will be the first out of the gate to release a notebook with the Ultrabook design. It added that Acer and Dell might start mass producing its first Ultrabooks in September but the actual release may be delayed. HP's Ultrabook entry might even be delayed until early 2012.

The Ultrabook concept has Intel's "Sandy Bridge" based Core i5 and i7 processors inside instead of the low powered Atom processor that Intel has inside a number of netbooks. It's also supposed to have a long battery life, be less than an inch thick and cost less than $1,000. Back in May Intel predicted that by the end of 2012 about 40 percent of all notebooks sold will be in the category that the Ultrabook is supposed to serve.

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Hello,

I would love to see a Lenovo ThinkPad variant of this, perhaps with the optical TrackPoint they are using in the keyboard dock for the ThinkPad Android tablet.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

"Ultrabook" is the biggest buzz word ever. How is it that nobody can see its simply the next generation of netbooks and not some revolutionary wonder laptop.

anybody else?

This is the manufacturer trying to massage public demand. There is too little profit in the netbooks that people actually want. They have to sell you something more expensive and tell you it is a really good netbook.
I have a desktop PC, so I have all the power I want. If I need more I can either buy better, or do it myself. I guess most people will just buy. The purpose of a portable device is portability. I do not need ultimate performance. All I need is a screen and WiFi. That gives me the choice of a nice basic netbook, a tablet or a chromebook (or whatever they call it).

How does this differ from the Dell Vistro v130? It's a thin and light, sub 1" thick, sub $1000, Core i5 CPU... I don't get it. Or is the v130 an ultrabook, just a year too early?

As good as laptops/notebooks/netbooks are, anything less that a 17 or 18" screen is rather useless to me. I like to actually SEE what's on the screen.

Stop this nonsense to compete with Macbook Air. Put the effort in producing $200-$250 laptops with fast i5-i7 CPUs and SSD HD.

alexalex said,
Stop this nonsense to compete with Macbook Air. Put the effort in producing $200-$250 laptops with fast i5-i7 CPUs and SSD HD.

*facepalm* You do realize the cost of the processors alone often exceeds $250, right? Never mind the motherboard, SSD, etc.

It should be a NO BRAINER to take a Macbook Air, cut the price in half, install Windows and basically do what we have been doing to Apple all along. Make it better, cheaper, and affordable for all. And FINALLY a LOT more secure than previous Windows OS's.

It's notebook hardware in netbook form-factor. I have an Acer AS1830T. It is an 11.6" Core i5 with 4GB of RAM, 500GB HD, and Windows 7 Home Premium. It has a rated 8-hour battery life, real-life 6. Though it came out a year or so before the "new" ultraportables, it is definitely an ultraportable. I love it.

I don't get it. How is this different than a laptop? Netbooks are just smaller (usually), less powerful laptops. This is a bigger, more powerful netbook...so, it's a laptop?

Simon- said,
or in other words, a "MacBook Air"

With a cheap plastic casing, no Apple logo, no Thunderbolt, maybe USB3 and probably cost less.

TruckWEB said,

With a cheap plastic casing, no Apple logo, no Thunderbolt, maybe USB3 and probably cost less.

Wow, you love a company. You must really be a genius! Every other pc manufacturer will try its hardest not to compete because you say so.

TruckWEB said,

With a cheap plastic casing, no Apple logo, no Thunderbolt, maybe USB3 and probably cost less.

The ASUS UX21 will be one of the first Ultrabooks released and it's got an aluminum body, USB 3.0 and glass touchpad. It will also be much cheaper than the Air. Oh, and I've got an Apple sticker I can throw on the back so that it will meet your criteria.

Julius Caro said,
how are they different than ULVs like the macbook air?

They aren't? The way I see it they're just very thin yet more powerful netbooks, and before someone else goes on about "notebooks" no, notebooks aren't this thin and light.

GP007 said,

They aren't? The way I see it they're just very thin yet more powerful netbooks, and before someone else goes on about "notebooks" no, notebooks aren't this thin and light.

if they arent they why are they saying "first" ultrabooks? there's already at least one

Julius Caro said,

if they arent they why are they saying "first" ultrabooks? there's already at least one

It about it being All Intel:
CPU
GPU
wireless cards
SSD storage

It can even been cheaper since they don't pay the over head that Apple does to get the tech from Intel, and it wont have the Apple mark up. It can, in theory, be an Air, but for a few hundred less.

Richio said,
Does it have a CD Drive?
Changeable ram?

RAM Maybe, CD Drive most likely not, think macbook air and youll get close to the concept

It should be a bit obvious that we want to move that way to ultra portable while on the road. At home I'll stick with my desktop for more important things and will eventually switch to a tablet once we can have the same OS across all platforms.

dogmai79 said,
It should be a bit obvious that we want to move that way to ultra portable while on the road. At home I'll stick with my desktop for more important things and will eventually switch to a tablet once we can have the same OS across all platforms.

And while our laptops go thinner and lighter, American's bodies grow wider and heavier