Rumor: Nokia "EOS" flagship to pack a quad-core chipset

We've seen bits and pieces of information trickle out surrounding the Nokia "EOS", the upcoming Windows Phone Lumia flagship that's said to be a true successor to the Lumia 920, with another leak today potentially giving us more solid specifications of the device. My Nokia Blog is reporting that, alongside a 41-megapixel PureView camera sensor, that the "EOS" will feature a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 chipset.

Although, Nokia is apparently only testing the Snapdragon 800 at the moment, and they have a back-up dual-core chipset ready to go just in case the 800 is not suitable. Battery life is reportedly an issue from the high-powered quad-core chipset, which can run at up to 2.3 GHz, despite the fact that Qualcomm has packed numerous speed-for-speed power efficiency improvements into the new chipset.

Aside from the "EOS" potentially including a Snapdragon 800, word on the streets is that Nokia has returned to AMOLED display technology, ditching IPS LCD panels like we saw in the Lumia 920 to potentially save battery life and physical size. The "EOS" is said to include a 1280 x 768 display, so no 1080p for Windows Phones just yet, and the battery will reportedly stay the same size as the Lumia 920 - 2,000 mAh.

Other rumored specs for the device include both an LED and Xenon flash for the 41-megapixel PureView camera, a more detailed camera UI that will apparently be similar to the 808 PureView, expandable storage through a microSD card slot, and an FM transmitter. If the rumors are to be believed, the "EOS" will launch on AT&T first in the United States as an exclusive, following a worldwide launch sometime after that.

Meanwhile, Nokia also has a number of other devices in the works, including the Lumia 928 and the "Catwalk", both of which could make an appearance alongside the "EOS" at a launch event sometime soon.

Source: My Nokia Blog

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SharpGreen said,

Source?

NT was always designed to be a microkernel. Back then, when NT was first released, hardware was too slow so they moved a couple userland things (like graphics) back into the kernel. Since Vista, MS has been working on reducing dependencies and simplifying the kernel. This does make it smaller, but I'm not sure they are moving things back into userland (which would be required to make it more of a microkernel.) NT is already more of a microkernel than any other popular kernel so I don't know that it is required.

Shadowzz said,

Uhm, Windows 8 surely has more build in features then Vista. Yet it runs smoother and faster on the hardware that was designed for Vista.
Stupid statement, but please try again. The only route NT/Windows seems to take is being more and more lightweight. They are even trying to make NT a microkernel...

Talk about stupid statements. Maybe you should reread a few things.

BannanaNinja said,

NT was always designed to be a microkernel. Back then, when NT was first released, hardware was too slow so they moved a couple userland things (like graphics) back into the kernel. Since Vista, MS has been working on reducing dependencies and simplifying the kernel. This does make it smaller, but I'm not sure they are moving things back into userland (which would be required to make it more of a microkernel.) NT is already more of a microkernel than any other popular kernel so I don't know that it is required.


NT is not a microkernel. MS never claimed that. NT is a heavy kernel compared to others.
There's a reason why it took untill recent years before NT was able to properly run on ARM. The ARM CPU wasnt able to handle anything more then a micro kernel. NT's minimum requirements are relatively high compared to just Linux, BSD etc.
But i think it was around or even before Windows 7. Where Microsoft deemed it nessesary to lighten the kernel. There was a blog post about it few months ago, maybe a bit longer.

The Micro NT kernel was a side project, just to make the kernel lighter. They used some of this in the Win8 NT kernel.
No direct source, keep yourself updated on the Windows dev blogs, technet/msdn.

It's the hardware game that they have to follow. Since consumers only care about the specs not the phone performance.

astalvfnw said,

then whats the point of quad core now? if you say to still improve speed then they should have stfu at that time

BannanaNinja said,

NT was always designed to be a microkernel. Back then, when NT was first released, hardware was too slow so they moved a couple userland things (like graphics) back into the kernel. Since Vista, MS has been working on reducing dependencies and simplifying the kernel. This does make it smaller, but I'm not sure they are moving things back into userland (which would be required to make it more of a microkernel.) NT is already more of a microkernel than any other popular kernel so I don't know that it is required.


Actually no it was never a microkernel. More of a hybrid for exactly the reasons you just mentioned. Some bits are in kernel mode, others not. For a microkernel, everything that is not essential to the running of said kernel is supposed to be in userland. Display, sound, network, file system, etc. etc.

Shadowzz said,

The ARM CPU wasnt able to handle anything more then a micro kernel.

Do you even know what a Microkernel is? Hint: Linux is a monolithic kernel, not s Microkernel...

Shadowzz said,

NT is not a microkernel. MS never claimed that. NT is a heavy kernel compared to others.
There's a reason why it took untill recent years before NT was able to properly run on ARM. The ARM CPU wasnt able to handle anything more then a micro kernel. NT's minimum requirements are relatively high compared to just Linux, BSD etc.

This is a contradiction. Microkernels are generally slower because they have most things running in userland. This means lots of context switches between kernel and user mode which takes time. Microkernels trade speed for simplicity and stability.

SharpGreen said,

Actually no it was never a microkernel. More of a hybrid for exactly the reasons you just mentioned. Some bits are in kernel mode, others not. For a microkernel, everything that is not essential to the running of said kernel is supposed to be in userland. Display, sound, network, file system, etc. etc.

While I don't disagree that it is now a hybrid kernel, originally NT did have much more of it running in userland. I guess we can argue the semantics of whether or not it was enough to be a microkernel, but the point still stands that NT was designed to be more microkernel-like than other kernel.

R1pper said,
it's funny, all those tiny details, and not once, just one time, is it said what "EOS" stand for.

EOS means all other smartphone camera are ****.

R1pper said,
it's funny, all those tiny details, and not once, just one time, is it said what "EOS" stand for.

End of story. For other smartphones!

Damn it... I want to get a Windows Phone but I dont know when to jump onboard.

I currently have an iPhone 5 on Verizon.

I'd like to get the Verizon version of the Lumia 920... but now I see this EOS device, which sounds better. Guess I'll just keep on waiting?

Maybe I'll keep on waiting and i'll never actually get anything :-/

MidTxWRX said,
Damn it... I want to get a Windows Phone but I dont know when to jump onboard.

I currently have an iPhone 5 on Verizon.

I'd like to get the Verizon version of the Lumia 920... but now I see this EOS device, which sounds better. Guess I'll just keep on waiting?

Maybe I'll keep on waiting and i'll never actually get anything :-/


I feel the same way... It would be easier if some of these phones (like the 928) actually came out! Lol

In my personal opinion, the big issue here is the way that these companies tell the public what new devices will be coming out ...a year from now.

I would rather it be similar to the way Apple does it, where they hold all information about the device (leaks will occur) and announce it on a specific day.

That way I can say. Damn I want that. And I'm able to go purchase it and feel like I have a device that will be relevant at least for a whole year. Which is a long time in this age of technology.

With Windows Phone and Android, I feel like if I go buy the current new device, a better one will come out next week. I can wait until next week to purchase the new one, but if I check online, I'll see that there's an even better coming out in 6 months. And an even better one in 12 months. Wtf.

I cant afford to purchase every new device... so I have to buy the best I can afford at the moment.

MidTxWRX said,
In my personal opinion, the big issue here is the way that these companies tell the public what new devices will be coming out ...a year from now.

I would rather it be similar to the way Apple does it, where they hold all information about the device (leaks will occur) and announce it on a specific day.

That way I can say. Damn I want that. And I'm able to go purchase it and feel like I have a device that will be relevant at least for a whole year. Which is a long time in this age of technology.

With Windows Phone and Android, I feel like if I go buy the current new device, a better one will come out next week. I can wait until next week to purchase the new one, but if I check online, I'll see that there's an even better coming out in 6 months. And an even better one in 12 months. Wtf.

I cant afford to purchase every new device... so I have to buy the best I can afford at the moment.

On one hand I agree. On the other hand I always feel bad for people who were buying the latest iphone the day before the new latest iphone comes out. The only winner there is the manu.

1080p is nice,but Nokia is not playing the cram all the specs you can game. They're creating an experience while keeping costs down,and I doubt 1080p is the deciding factor when choosing one of their phones.

vcfan said,
1080p is nice,but Nokia is not playing the cram all the specs you can game. They're creating an experience while keeping costs down,and I doubt 1080p is the deciding factor when choosing one of their phones.

It should be.

mrdeezus said,

It should be.

Why? For the lower battery life? 1080p screens require more GPU power to drive, and take more power to drive to the same brightness.

There's little reason for 1080p on a phone. It's just a spec measuring contest.

like someone has said before, WP8 does not support 1080p atm so why put in a screen that cant be used at that resolution yet.

Id say they may put in a quad core to help speed up the process of doing what the 41mp camera does and the pureview software. Might take some power to do stuff with images at that resolution and making it lag or take ages wont be helping the lumia.

That phone looks good though. 10 months and counting till end of my contract, the futures bright the futures nokia

"...and an FM transmitter"

This for me is key as (if the rumours/leaks are true) it means FM radio (at least) is returning to Windows Phone. This was one downside for me when making the switch from WP7 to WP8.

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