Rumor: Touchscreen-based Chromebooks coming in 2013

There's been a steady rise in the number of Chromebooks made by other PC makers in the last few months, including new models from Lenovo and, most recently, HP. Now there's word that Google is working with PC makers to launch new Chromebook devices that will include touchscreens as well, similar to many Windows 8 laptops.

The Wall Street Journal, citing unnamed sources, didn't have much in the way of details, saying only that the touchscreen Chromebooks would be launched sometime later in 2013. Google has yet to comment on the newspaper's report.

The article points out that if new Chromebooks are released with touchscreens, software developers will have to make changes in order for their Chrome OS apps to work with touch-based hardware. It's almost certain that any Chromebooks with touchscreens will be more expensive than the ones currently on sale. One of the biggest selling points of Chromebooks is their cheap price, with some models being sold for as little as $199, and most costing significantly less than a typical Windows 8- or OS X-powered laptop.

Recently a video showing what appeared to be a high-resolution, touchscreen-based Chromebook with a Google brand made its way to the Internet. However, Google has not yet confirmed or denied that this is a real and upcoming product, and there's some debate over whether or not the video itself was fake.

Source: Wall Street Journal | Image via HP

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9 Comments

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Google sees some kind of need/use for the Chromebooks. Interested to see how they will do. They are not meant to take the market by storm, but rather serve a certain set of people.

Exactly. I look at Chromebooks as serving the niche between people who want a basic internet device, but don't want a tablet.

I must admit thought that I was sceptical about Chromebooks (and to an extent I still am). The sales figures are encouraging for a niche product that many manufacturers seem to have forgotten about.

Majesticmerc said,
Exactly. I look at Chromebooks as serving the niche between people who want a basic internet device, but don't want a tablet.

I must admit thought that I was sceptical about Chromebooks (and to an extent I still am). The sales figures are encouraging for a niche product that many manufacturers seem to have forgotten about.

Think it would be perfect for say, older people who dont want to mess around with hassle of a full system. If Google didnt think these would be profitable, then I am sure they would be canceled.

Majesticmerc said,
Exactly. I look at Chromebooks as serving the niche between people who want a basic internet device, but don't want a tablet.

I must admit thought that I was sceptical about Chromebooks (and to an extent I still am). The sales figures are encouraging for a niche product that many manufacturers seem to have forgotten about.

Manufactures didn't forget about the netbook style computer but merely realised there was no market in it. Pretty much 0 profit market and all the consumer does is rage that their computer is slow, couple that with the fact the chromebook is basically a glorified browser -the OEMs will not bother continuing the line. They cannot replace anything and do not add anything to your computing pool.

ingramator said,

Manufactures didn't forget about the netbook style computer but merely realised there was no market in it. Pretty much 0 profit market and all the consumer does is rage that their computer is slow, couple that with the fact the chromebook is basically a glorified browser -the OEMs will not bother continuing the line. They cannot replace anything and do not add anything to your computing pool.

And Acer reports that Chromebooks account for 5 - 10 percent of US PC shipments since they released it in November.

And Netbooks are different from Chromebooks. Different concept, different uses, different appeal to a different set of people.

techbeck said,

And Acer reports that Chromebooks account for 5 - 10 percent of US PC shipments since they released it in November.

And Netbooks are different from Chromebooks. Different concept, different uses, different appeal to a different set of people.

The 5-10% of PC shipments is wrong, I believe they said "notebooks" and because Acer is mad at Microsoft I would take that figure with a large grain of salt.

I would love to know how the concep uses and appeal are different to those of a netbook?