Rumor: Will Intel-based Android tablets be cheaper than Windows 8 devices?

A few days ago, Intel CEO Paul Otellini said that touchscreen-based products that will use the company's upcoming Bay Trail processor would be sold later this year and that they "are going to be down to as low as $200." Now there's word that those ultra-cheap touchscreen devices may be based not on Microsoft's Windows 8, as most assumed, but with Google's Android OS.

CNET reports they have an unnamed source which is quoted as saying, "There are design wins for Android tablets at that $200 price point. Intel will be participating in that market this year." Another report on Digitimes claims, again via unnamed sources, that Intel processors will be inside "Android convertible notebooks" that will be launched in the coming months by a number of PC OEMs, including HP, Lenovo, Asus, Acer and Toshiba.

These rumors come one day after Microsoft confirmed that it is working with PC OEMs to make smaller Windows 8-based touchscreen products that will launch in the near future, although specifics about those products have not been revealed. Analysts who spoke to CNET claim that seven- or eight-inch Windows 8 tablets with Intel chips inside could be priced as low as $299.

There's been no indication that Intel had any plans before now to offer its chips for Android-based tablets and notebooks. The company does have smartphone-based processors that have been used inside a few Android phones. Earlier this month, ZTE announced a new Android 4.2 smartphone called the "Geek" that has Intel's Clover Trail+ Atom processor.

Source: CNET | Image via Intel

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there are already sub $200 android tablets, I don't think an intel android tablet will make a difference to anybody. Its not that special when compared to arm.

BUT,an intel windows 8 tablet is different than an arm windows 8(RT) tablet.

btw,there are already 10 inch windows netbooks in the $200-$300 range,i don't see why they couldn't bring windows 8 tablets in that price point.i mean for $350 you can get a full blown windows 8 laptop.

I think Android apps run inside a JVM so everything will just work between ARM and x86.

Most of the apps that Windows has an advantage on are Win32 though, so they need an x86 CPIU to be worth it. Windows RT applications don't yet live up to those on Android, unless you really value Office (which is a huge plus it has to be said - that's why I plan on a Windows tablet rather than iPad or Android, when they catch up to my 2008 laptop and I can afford one ).

For testing I got a Samsung Slate PC with Core i5, 4 Gb Ram, 128 Gb SSD, 6+ hours battery Tablet under $1,000 that simply blows my also new Acer Aspire V5 Touch with Core i3, 6 Gb Ram, 1 Tb SATA, 4 hour+ battery ultrabook over $1,000. Makes me sad to see how much faster the Slate PC opens real programs. In both I got W8 Pro clean installation too.

I've run Android in a VM *and* inside a JVM (remember, there is an OVA of Jellybean for x86) and a straight VM (as opposed to a JVM) runs much quicker on x86. If you can run OVAs (I know that VMware and VirtualBox support them - investigating to see if Hyper-V does also), Google the Jellybean OVA and see for yourself.

singularity87 said,
I think Android apps run inside a JVM so everything will just work between ARM and x86.

Yes, they run in Dalvik, but Android allows for native libraries to be used, so some games and apps like spotify won't work on prosessors like.. MIPS.

Windows (non-RT or any other decent OS, which Android isn't) is the only reason why I'd want x86 in the first place.
Why do they have to ship any OS with them, though? Make it default, but optional. I have Windows 8 from Dreamspark which I'll probably not use anyway otherwise.

Android is a scaled-down OS designed for phones. Windows 8 is a full-blown OS designed for computers. There are only a few hundred thousand apps for Android compared to the millions of apps for Windows. Why would anyone want Android?

Windows doesn't have any apps that make fart noises though.

Major Plonquer said,
Android is a scaled-down OS designed for phones. Windows 8 is a full-blown OS designed for computers. There are only a few hundred thousand apps for Android compared to the millions of apps for Windows. Why would anyone want Android?

Windows doesn't have any apps that make fart noises though.


Touch screen compatibility I guess unless you like to bring a mouse on the bus or train.

Android was designed for dumb phones and ca,eras...everything about its current iteration is not part of its infrastructure design... where as the nr kernel has always been designed to be a fully capable expandable os

tanjiajun_34 said,

Touch screen compatibility I guess unless you like to bring a mouse on the bus or train.

Windows has been compatible with touch since before Windows 7.

FalseAgent said,
Cheaper, but also more useless. At least a Windows 8 tablet would let me print and stuff.

u can print prefectly fine on android, just install the app from the printer manufacture and your are set to go

FalseAgent said,
Cheaper, but also more useless. At least a Windows 8 tablet would let me print and stuff.
Just saying Android and iOS allows printing. But the potential of Windows 8 is definitely much bigger.

FalseAgent said,
Cheaper, but also more useless. At least a Windows 8 tablet would let me print and stuff.

My dad can print whatever he wants from his Nexus 7, we have a generic HP printer.

DKAngel said,

u can print prefectly fine on android, just install the app from the printer manufacture and your are set to go

okay, guys, when I say "print", I say printing in the way we're used to. I have a canon printer and the canon app for android only allows for printing photos and it only connects to wireless canon pixma printers, and mine is not wireless.

Android can print, but there are so many caveats, even Windows RT is ahead of it when it comes to printing.

We got Dot Matrix printers for Invoice Department running on a Samsung Slate PC (Core i5) and an Acer Iconia W5 (AMD) with W8 easily. We also got like 25 LaserJet network printers all running and prints (WYSIWYG for old timers) exactly as the original document, even if it's 200 and so pages with images. We have 10 photocopiers (Xerox, Cannon, Nikkon, etc.) that work as secondary printers, no problem getting them running on W8 Tablets. Then there are 3 Plotters (60", 90" and 120"), all of them configured and running too. There are each Director's and Manager's individual scanner/printers for presentations, up and running. We have not been able to solve any of those in an Acer Iconia A500 Android Tablet, nor any iPad. Talk about real printing!

FalseAgent said,
Cheaper, but also more useless. At least a Windows 8 tablet would let me print and stuff.

printing works even on my phone with android, lame excuses

FalseAgent said,

okay, guys, when I say "print", I say printing in the way we're used to. I have a canon printer and the canon app for android only allows for printing photos and it only connects to wireless canon pixma printers, and mine is not wireless.

Android can print, but there are so many caveats, even Windows RT is ahead of it when it comes to printing.

Give it a try...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-8bnejng3Y
Using USB not wireless for this method.

Duh.

Two tablets with identical hardware, one runs Windows, one runs Android.

Assuming the same amount of profit for the manufacturer per device, the Windows one will cost more by however much a Windows 8 license cost per device is for an OEM.

Especially when you're talking about sub-$300 devices, that Windows license cost is a significant factor.

Stetson said,
Duh.

Two tablets with identical hardware, one runs Windows, one runs Android.

Assuming the same amount of profit for the manufacturer per device, the Windows one will cost more by however much a Windows 8 license cost per device is for an OEM.

Especially when you're talking about sub-$300 devices, that Windows license cost is a significant factor.

That didn't seem to be the case for netbooks, I paid $300 for my old Win7 netbook years ago. People seem to think that oems pay a lot for their licenses but we just don't know for sure. The fact they can buy in bulk and depending on the device they'll be used on I bet the costs could be minor when compared to the hardware costs.

MS could do very low pricing for 7" tablets for example, and you already have a number of android oems paying royalties to plus they have to cover additional support fees for software that is normally covered by MS when it comes to windows itself. I wouldn't be surprised if it comes out even or close to it from the oems point.

Considering many Android devices have huge lag in getting OS updates, or never get an update since launch, in the long run a Windows tablet will make more sense in getting future OS updates. Android devices typically would need to be replaced every couple years to stay current.

This is why Android doesn't really have a future in the enterprise. The turnover rate for purchasing devices for consistent support and administration is unrealistic in that environment. Our own organization purchased iPads and a few Android tablets over the years, but the only ones that got "official" updates were either the popular devices or the ipads of which our first gen devices can't be upgraded. We got a few Dell Latitude 10s in and are impressed by them. Since they are Windows devices, we're able to manage them as if they were any other PC and above all I suspect they will get updates all the way through to WIndows 9, meaning we can guarantee the latest security patches, consistent user experience, software compatibility, and a host of other reasons, we are probably going to ditch iPads, and Android tablets for Windows Tablets. We aren't going to make any major purchases until Haswell and Broadwell devices come out, but I suspect many enterprises will come to the same conclusions.

Drewidian said,
This is why Android doesn't really have a future in the enterprise. The turnover rate for purchasing devices for consistent support and administration is unrealistic in that environment. Our own organization purchased iPads and a few Android tablets over the years, but the only ones that got "official" updates were either the popular devices or the ipads of which our first gen devices can't be upgraded. We got a few Dell Latitude 10s in and are impressed by them. Since they are Windows devices, we're able to manage them as if they were any other PC and above all I suspect they will get updates all the way through to WIndows 9, meaning we can guarantee the latest security patches, consistent user experience, software compatibility, and a host of other reasons, we are probably going to ditch iPads, and Android tablets for Windows Tablets. We aren't going to make any major purchases until Haswell and Broadwell devices come out, but I suspect many enterprises will come to the same conclusions.

I thought enterprise are the ones that hardly update their Windows OS anyway?

tanjiajun_34 said,

I thought enterprise are the ones that hardly update their Windows OS anyway?

That's exactly my point. Because of the update cycle, and the need to consistently purchase new systems, we need a platform that will make sure that all of the devices can stay consistent. If we wait for a year for the next major upgrade can we deploy it on the older hardware is a question we would have to ask about each Android or iOS device.

We don't upgrade frequently, but when you have 10K PCs that you are going to update it makes it easier, but when you can use services like System Center or Intune, you can do it with a much smaller staff and can have a rather seamless roll out. How would you update Android or iOS devices en masse like that when for Android, you could have 30-40 different pieces of hardware and different supported versions of the OS and the OS needs to be customized for each device, and as for iOS, while the device pool is smaller, can anyone tell for sure if the ipad 2 will get iOS 7? I doubt it.

Drewidian said,
This is why Android doesn't really have a future in the enterprise. The turnover rate for purchasing devices for consistent support and administration is unrealistic in that environment. Our own organization purchased iPads and a few Android tablets over the years, but the only ones that got "official" updates were either the popular devices or the ipads of which our first gen devices can't be upgraded. We got a few Dell Latitude 10s in and are impressed by them. Since they are Windows devices, we're able to manage them as if they were any other PC and above all I suspect they will get updates all the way through to WIndows 9, meaning we can guarantee the latest security patches, consistent user experience, software compatibility, and a host of other reasons, we are probably going to ditch iPads, and Android tablets for Windows Tablets. We aren't going to make any major purchases until Haswell and Broadwell devices come out, but I suspect many enterprises will come to the same conclusions.

This is NOT simply an OS problem, but an PC vs Tablet/Netbook and pricing problem. We are having just as much of a problem where I work with Windows. If the "total" price and function is not there, then it simply does not work in the long run. If I can get 2 or more disposable wireless non-Microsoft units for the price of one, and still be able to use internal software where needed, then that's a win. This truly depends on the users, their locations, and what they are accessing. Like it or not people are demanding cloud services and anywhere access. We have been replacing Windows units at a faster rate than ever before. If something is cheaper, and it gets the same job done for the "majority" of users (most money), then that's where our focus will be.

I believe the price of Windows will drive up at a rapid pace. This first wave of PC sales numbers has already caused waves. I know a few people higher up in the top 5 leading companies personally, and some warnings have gone out along with more of a shift in focus. If MS fails to capture and retain more "desktop" sales, there may be an even faster shift in hardware focus. The option for adding the old start button "and" start menu in the next version of Windows 8 on a desktop should not even be a question. Many companies that have never thought of going without desktops for a large part of their user base simply are now, along with rethinking how and where relevant secure materials are stored. MS can try locking everyone else out of their browsers, but at this point that is simply a bad move. On top of being evident, it would force companies away from MS faster. MS simply does not hold enough leverage at this time in the overall anywhere access world to continue in their old monopolistic Rockefeller way.

Edited by thatmikeguy2, Apr 22 2013, 3:07pm :

We may hate to see this happen, but the truth is overall security for "MOST" businesses (as in a pool of all businesses with a network of any size large or small), actually has LESS security off the cloud overall, and is FAR cheaper (personnel, administration, tech costs). One model is not somehow magically superior from the top down as far as security goes, with people demanding anywhere access.

Edited by thatmikeguy2, Apr 22 2013, 3:36pm :

I have a Nexus 10 and for $400, it's been an OK choice for work presentations in the field and a few other apps I like using, it's quick and looks great, but I miss my "real" computer badly. If Windows 8 was available, for anything close to that price point, I would have gladly chosen it over Android. Windows could completely take over the tablet market if they get just a few things right, phones are another story.

This is why I bought a Vivotab RT with keyboard for $430. It was cheap and gives me internet, music, video, Acrobat, Word, Excel and Powerpoint. What more could I ask for!

Hahaiah said,
I have a Nexus 10 and for $400, it's been an OK choice for work presentations in the field and a few other apps I like using, it's quick and looks great, but I miss my "real" computer badly. If Windows 8 was available, for anything close to that price point, I would have gladly chosen it over Android. Windows could completely take over the tablet market if they get just a few things right, phones are another story.

Uh the Acer W510 is $399 at Microsoft Store and has been for some time. It comes with full Windows 8.

http://www.microsoftstore.com/..._US/pdp/productID.258409200

Philip James Fry said,
"Will Intel-based Android tablets be cheaper than Windows 8 devices?"

Yes.

but will also be worse.
/thread.


I have an Android phone which has 1.6Ghz SINGLE CORE Clover Trail Atom CPU and it is as smooth as butter, as smooth if not faster than my old dual core Galaxy Note and it only cost me £99.

jakem1 said,
It is also a lot less capable than Windows so it makes sense that it should cost less.

That really works both ways and depends on the chip architecture you're running on. Android is far more capable than Windows RT is on ARM, but Windows 8 is far more capable than Android is on x86.

All depends what you're running it on.

This quote from Paul is hardly talking about android devices ""If you look at touch-enabled Intel-based notebooks that are ultrathin using [Atom] processors. Those prices are going to be down to as low as $200," said Intel CEO Paul Otellini. " there are no ultra thin intel base android notebooks and I don't think he is talking about chrome devices as they are already 200 price range and are not selling. as for the source DigiTimes they have a 0% track record.. it is clear he is talking about win 8 touch screen ultra books and convertibles.

Javik said,
That's an outright lie, Android can do everything Windows RT does, and with a far wider range of applications.

FloatingFatMan said,
Incorrect, but please, prove it.

I don't think you guys realize how big Windows really is. RT is not modern UI only, and is far more capable than Android.

pantera9 said,

I don't think you guys realize how big Windows really is. RT is not modern UI only, and is far more capable than Android.

I'm not some teen noob, you know. I've been writing software for windows since Windows 1.0.

pantera9 said,
I don't think you guys realize how big Windows really is. RT is not modern UI only, and is far more capable than Android.

What does Windows RT have to offer more than Android? Correct, nothing. Windows RT is in fact unfortunately just the modern UI with a fraction of the apps and features Android offers since years.

If you want to artificially limit yourself in useability and features, then please, go ahead and buy Windows RT tablet. Windows Surface Pro is of course a different story.