Samsung gives first look at the Nexus Prime

Samsung has given a first - and very brief - official look at its Nexus Prime smartphone, expected to be launched on October 11.

A YouTube video posted earlier today by the company begins by describing things that ''just go'' together, an obvious allusion to the next generation of the Android OS, dubbed ''Ice Cream Sandwich'' and expected to appear first on the Nexus Prime. The Prime, like the Nexus S and Nexus One before it, is colloquially known as a Googlephone because it was developed in partnership with the search giant and runs a pure version of the Android mobile OS.

The Samsung video then shows a profile view of a smartphone, presumably the Prime, revealing first that the phone will feature the same curved display as the Nexus S, dubbed a Contour Display by Google. Three gold dots that appear to be contact points could indicate inductive charging will be included, while a silver back plate may indicate the Prime will have a metal back, though an apparently plastic face would make that an odd inclusion in terms of design. The power button appears to be on the top right side of the phone, the same location as on the Nexus S, while the protruding ''chin'' at the bottom of the Nexus S also appears to be present on the Prime.

The video then ends by teasing the company's Unpacked event, to be held October 11 in San Diego. The Nexus Prime and Android Ice Cream Sandwich are both expected to be launched at the event.

Meantime, GSMArena believes it has gotten the first unofficial look at Google's next flagship phone via a photo purportedly showing a Prime in debug mode. The photo, if accurate, confirms previously rumoured specs that give the phone a 1280x720 Super AMOLED HD display on a 4.6" screen, and a pixel density of about 320 ppi, just short of the iPhone 4 and 4S on 326 ppi. The photo also reveals the Prime will apparently lack hardware keys on the front, instead opting for software rendered keys. Check out the photo below.

Previous leaks and rumours have also stated the Prime will be packing a 1.5 GHz dual-core processor,1 GB of RAM, 1 MP front and 8 MP rear cameras, 4G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, and Near Field Communication, as already featured on the Nexus S and Nexus S 4G. In any case, we have less than a week until the truth is revealed.

Photo Credits: Samsung, GSMArena
 

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Tablets and phones are getting closer and closer, there are quite a lot of 7 inch tablets and phones are getting close to 5 inchs.

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1280x720 Super AMOLED HD display on a 4.6" screen

Hmmm...Samsung could be in trouble - hasn't Apple already patented that for the iPhone5?

Cute James said,

Hmmm...Samsung could be in trouble - hasn't Apple already patented that for the iPhone5?


eh? (super)amoled displays is a product by samsung

I'm still on my LG Dare, I'm rocking a 3" touchscreen, 240x400 resolution, with a wonderful 3.2 MP camera taking crap 640x480 VGA pictures. I was holding out for the iPhone 5, then that horrific keynote hit yesterday. I am going the way of the Prime and not looking back. I have an iPad2, and being on that for a while, I am begging for customization.

This will definitely be my next phone and I can't wait to get my hands on it! I hope there isn't a long wait for the release after it's been unveiled next week. I need an upgrade from my Nexus One

Enron said,
This phone eats iPhone 4S for breakfast.

It's not all about specs, it's the experience, but measubators don't understand that...

tmaxxtigger said,

It's not all about specs, it's the experience, but measubators don't understand that...

Experience and efficiency. Apple could throw in even faster specs, but you would kiss your battery life bye bye.

Enron said,
This phone eats iPhone 4S for breakfast.

Nope. No matter how good this hardware it's Android and you're stuck downloading apps from the malware infested Market. Better to be inside one of the "walled gardens".

C'mon, Android and iOS is more than just about the apps you can get. I guess that's the card iOS has to play these days. 500,000 apps is all great and everything but i don't need that many. I've installed probably 6 extra apps from market and they are all from big name companies. I don't feel deprived at all.

KingCrimson said,

Nope. No matter how good this hardware it's Android and you're stuck downloading apps from the malware infested Market. Better to be inside one of the "walled gardens".


I have yet to see one malware on my phone and on others phones, while they have their PC filled with malware.

Keep spreading FUD.

KingCrimson said,

Nope. No matter how good this hardware it's Android and you're stuck downloading apps from the malware infested Market. Better to be inside one of the "walled gardens".

I've downloaded hundreds of apps from the "Malware infested Market" and am yet to get any kind of malware.. I must be really lucky!

KingCrimson said,

Nope. No matter how good this hardware it's Android and you're stuck downloading apps from the malware infested Market. Better to be inside one of the "walled gardens".

And you have no idea what you are talking about. The malware needs your permission to install and mainly are not on the Android or Amazon Markets. Some are which are removed QUICKLY or uninstalled by Google. Never had any issues and never read one article about anyone bitching and moaning about it other than people who do not like Android.

So try again

HawkMan said,
Why would "contact points" indicate inductive charging...

My thoughts exactly. To me it would indicate some sort of dock. You know, the sort that doesn't use induction because there are physical contact points.

GP007 said,
Software rendered keys? No thanks. I'll take something with physical keys any day.

Why? I'm curious to know what benefits you think there are of physical over software keys. I love how they're implemented on Honeycomb tablets and I can't assume these will be any different.

jeston said,

Why? I'm curious to know what benefits you think there are of physical over software keys. I love how they're implemented on Honeycomb tablets and I can't assume these will be any different.

Because if the software ****s up, the keys dont respond.

GP007 said,
Software rendered keys? No thanks. I'll take something with physical keys any day.

I like that apps are beginning to hide the keys when they aren't required (Eg. watching movie). Then you get more screen real estate for movie.

htcz said,

Because if the software ****s up, the keys don't respond.
But have you met someone with a honeycomb tablet that had this problem at a point? no. Even Nokia is betting on this with the n9 (no buttons, swiping, maemo) or the searay (software buttons, windows phone 7.5) Nokia wouldn't bet on it if it had problems.
Not to mention those physical buttons on an android phone are owned by the OS, if the software messes up they don't work either (notice how when your in recovery etc, you use the volume keys and power not the 4 android buttons)

Nexus- said,
But have you met someone with a honeycomb tablet that had this problem at a point? no. Even Nokia is betting on this with the n9 (no buttons, swiping, maemo) or the searay (software buttons, windows phone 7.5) Nokia wouldn't bet on it if it had problems.
Not to mention those physical buttons on an android phone are owned by the OS, if the software messes up they don't work either (notice how when your in recovery etc, you use the volume keys and power not the 4 android buttons)

I've seens androids, symbians, etc all mess up. It isn't towards one specific platform.

When a app gets stuck and you hold a physical key on your phone to kill it, it will kill it. It does not depend on the OS like software keys...

htcz said,

I've seens androids, symbians, etc all mess up. It isn't towards one specific platform.

When a app gets stuck and you hold a physical key on your phone to kill it, it will kill it. It does not depend on the OS like software keys...

Being a software developer I can assure you that what you are claiming is not true. All keys are handled by the OS/application support layer and may not respond if the software that's intended to handle them freezes. The only key that can have a difference is the screen lock/standby button because it can be connected to the low level processor watchdog system to trigger a system reset when held for a fiew seconds.

htcz said,

I've seens androids, symbians, etc all mess up. It isn't towards one specific platform.

When a app gets stuck and you hold a physical key on your phone to kill it, it will kill it. It does not depend on the OS like software keys...

Being a software developer I can assure you that what you are claiming is not true. All keys are handled by the OS/application support layer and may not respond if the software that's intended to handle them freezes. The only key that can have a difference is the screen lock/standby button because it can be connected to the low level processor watchdog system to trigger a system reset when held for a fiew seconds.

m1h4 said,

Being a software developer I can assure you that what you are claiming is not true. All keys are handled by the OS/application support layer and may not respond if the software that's intended to handle them freezes. The only key that can have a difference is the screen lock/standby button because it can be connected to the low level processor watchdog system to trigger a system reset when held for a fiew seconds.


Being ALSO a software developer I can assure you that what I am claiming is true.

There is a difference between the OS and software that runs ON the OS. If software freezes (on mobile devices), I cannot access other software (such as the software input). Now, if I access a key controlled by the OS, I can access other software as the OS controls the software.

htcz said,

Being ALSO a software developer I can assure you that what I am claiming is true.

There is a difference between the OS and software that runs ON the OS. If software freezes (on mobile devices), I cannot access other software (such as the software input). Now, if I access a key controlled by the OS, I can access other software as the OS controls the software.

Dude you don't know what you're talking about. Hardware keys are simply peripherals connected to the device that the OS has drivers for...they do not have the control to reset the OS because they are connected to the OS, and not anything that controls the OS.

The home button on the iPhone does not unfreeze iOS because iOS will not respond if it is frozen...but if the app freezes, yes the home button can tell iOS to kill it. If iOS is not responding, the only thing you can do is press and hold the power button to kill the power and reboot.

On my Samsung Focus that uses capacitive buttons, it does the same thing. It vibrates anytime you tap on a button. When an app freezes and I tap on Bing for example, it'll switch to Bing. But if the phone stops responding, just like the iPhone, my Start button won't work, and it won't vibrate if I tap it...I'll have to press and hold the power button to reboot the device.

Same thing with software buttons except the buttons will be rendered completely by the device. But they will work essentially the same way, and if the app freezes, those buttons will still work, if the OS freezes, no they will not work.

UndergroundWire said,
It's sad that the specs are better than the iPhone 4S, And the iPhone 4S is not even out yet.

well when their projector projected the slide that said Best iPhone ever or something. I understood then that they arent really competing with these heavy duty phones now. They just want that market they already have.

techLogik said,

Because no one wants 3.5" screens anymore..
The screen size is fine, the resolution seems unnecessary and a waste of cost.

Simon. said,
The screen size is fine, the resolution seems unnecessary and a waste of cost.

how is it unnecessary? I think they were after cost when they thought of implementing this. if this is unnecessary so is Retina Display.

I think it is not. I think this resolution should be the standard for 4inch upwards. This res will allow easy webpage reading in portrait mode and perfect for landscape with the full website showing. Also Better for movies. And higher density display means text can go smaller without losing sharpness so more can be present on the screen at a time. Plus its a super amoled. Perfecto!