Samsung reveals new Windows 8 touch-based PC monitor

New Year's Day 2013 also means there's less than a week before CES 2013 begins in Las Vegas and some companies are already making some reveals of what they will be showing off on the show floor ahead of time, including Samsung.

Today, Samsung said it would be showing two upcoming monitors designed for PC desktops as part of its CES 2013 product lineup; one of them, the 24 inch Series 7 Touch SC770. This monitor is the first the company has made to specifically support Windows 8 and its touch screen UI. The press release states:

Supporting up to 10 points of simultaneous multi-touch, users can drag, rotate or select objects on the monitor using their fingers. The flexible, ergonomic stand of the SC770 conveniently adjusts to user preferences, offering a 60-degree tilt for comfortable use of the touch display. Additionally, the ultra-thin bezel along with wide viewing angles provides a truly immersive viewing experience.

Samsung will also show the non-touch screen 27 inch Series 7 SC750 monitor at CES 2013, which can be positioned in a 90-degree format for viewing content in either landscape or portrait mode. Both monitors have a top resolution of 1920x1080. While Samsung has yet to reveal pricing for either one of these monitors, they will go on sale sometime in the first quarter of 2013.

Source: Samsung | Image via Samsung

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Looking at this from the business perspective. This touch stuff has got out of hand! What exactly is wrong with a keyboard and mouse. It has served us well for 30 years. Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. It is good to give options and I think touch devices have their place, overall I think a keyboard and mouse is generally more productive for your average desk worker.

jp2341 said,
Looking at this from the business perspective. This touch stuff has got out of hand! What exactly is wrong with a keyboard and mouse. It has served us well for 30 years. Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. It is good to give options and I think touch devices have their place, overall I think a keyboard and mouse is generally more productive for your average desk worker.

It has served those with full dexterity well for thirty years and not without a lot of repetitive stress injuries and redesigns of hardware to improve the ergonomics to reduce injury.
My son cannot type or use a mouse, but he sure as **** can play cut the rope on SurfaceRT.
Just because YOU can't envision how YOU would use something doesn't mean the product space shouldn't exist.
I don't need Stephen Hawkings wheelchar, but I'm glad the guy has it.
Wake up. We need more ways to interact with technology and boiling down to touch is the simplest interaction model. Now that the hardware is finally catching up to the concept, I can't wait to see how things will change.
Look at the control systems at CERN, it's a TOUCHSCHREEN!!!!!!!

Do not think of it from an office perspective. I have a touch screen monitor (the new dell one) and its perfect for my pc. My pc is in my living room. I can walk over to it and use the touch screen to do quick actions like checking my email (using the metro app) or switching songs . Things like that . When our baby is born my wife can use the machine to text or, email, or Skype me real quick with one hand and the baby in another.

You have to think outside the box.

I like the idea so long as I can pull the monitor down and angle it. One of those Samsung models doesn't do that. It looks nice, but for that reason it's crap - don't buy it. The other one, OTOH, looks like it does do that. That one looks great.

Touch like using a tablet would be comfortable. touching a monitor would not be comfortable long. the touch screens have promise just not in traditional use. we need to adapt, but in a manner that makes sense. this is a new tool. someone will figure it out while most will be unhappy until it evolves. but all that will happen. my first windows tablet in 2005 i slap wore it out. just replaced it in 2011 with android (xoom). i have watched people try to be productive with a touchscreen monitor at a desk and we are not there yet.

I have the new dell touchscreen monitor. They are good as a companion with a mouse and keyboard on windows 8. Like accessing the new metro start menu .

Checking email real quick with the metro mail program.

If you use it in combination with a mouse and keyboard its work real well.

MY pc is in my living room so the touch screen works real well to do things like start my music real quick, or check email , or a website real quick without a lot of typing.

Ok, now everyone picture themselves using a keyboard and mouse while standing. Ok, now think about using a touch screen while standing. Get it yet?

There are situations where having a touch screen comes in handy especially if it is a computer station that you need to interact with while on your feet. For home: the kitchen for example. Lots of examples I could think of at my work. Often we want to run testing while on our feet and keyboard+mouse is not meant for that (in fact you can damage your wrist if you are not careful about that). So we have to sit down for any kind of input, but that isn't a very good position to be in to make observations sometimes.

I personally feel that the modern touch interface requires so much space to do the basics. Its not like we are ever going to get more pointed fingers in the future, the main part of this clunky new interface is our clunky human fingers.

I feel im being told that my desktop and great input devices are things of the past, and these basic apps are the way forward just because i can hit it with my finger. Its all a bit crazy and i find myself pulling away from one of my favourite hobbies.

you're being told by the market. companies sell what people want,and people want touch,so the market adjusts to fill those needs. now,it could end up being this huge fad, or not. If you don't enter the market,you could lose out in the end if it ends up being a permanent thing. If it ends up being a fad,at least you covered your base.

Call me old fashioned, but I really don't see me ever wanting to touch a desktop monitor. Keyboard and mouse work much better for me as desktop input. Reaching across the desk to put fingerprints on the screen seems like a step back, at least ergonomically.

Big no for my main desktop, just wouldn't be practical with the positioning, never mind also suffering a bit of anal-retentiveness when it comes to fingerprints on my system. Really interested in one or two of these for the family room or kitchen though, would be pretty convenient for that sort of thing where you don't want/need a full desktop setup.. throw in a USB wireless remote and I can think of all sorts of uses for this.

So let me get this straight... Your sat infront your PC with a keyboard and mouse right in front of you but they expect you'll want to use a cumbersome touch interface at a 90 degree angle?

Don't get me wrong, on a phone/tablet it's unavoidable, but when you have a keyboard and mouse I can't see anyone using touch?

#fail

i would like to own one next to my non touch screen one for desktop and one for all metro apps / watching movies

barteh said,
So let me get this straight... Your sat infront your PC with a keyboard and mouse right in front of you but they expect you'll want to use a cumbersome touch interface at a 90 degree angle?

Don't get me wrong, on a phone/tablet it's unavoidable, but when you have a keyboard and mouse I can't see anyone using touch?

#fail

It is fun to see these posts, now I can mark off the people that have NEVER used a touch monitor to compliment their workspace.

This is like people that complain about a 'stylus' or other alternative input modalities, yet have no experience with them, so they respond, "Fire bad, grr arg."

PS Go back 20 years, people were making the same comments about Windows 3.x and how silly a MOUSE was, when you are already sitting in front of your computer with a keyboard.

thenetavenger said,

PS Go back 20 years, people were making the same comments about Windows 3.x and how silly a MOUSE was, when you are already sitting in front of your computer with a keyboard.

And just 5 years ago, people were complaining about using a touchscreen-only phone with the iPhone, and that they preferred to use a Blackberry because it had a physical keyboard.

Now it's not realistic to attach a keyboard to a phone, so I'm pretty sure the keyboard and mouse aren't dead, but you'll see a huge change in computing just because touch is so much more convenient. I mean with pointing your finger, you don't have to watch the screen to see if you've moved your hand enough. You know how much you've moved your hand because it's part of you. With a mouse and cursor, there is no feedback besides the screen. Touch is going to significantly speed up interacting with a computer. Then again I don't see it as being the end-all solution for human computer interfaces.

this would work great in a school, public room. big screen that doesnt have a desktop in the corner with only 1 meter cable for the keyboard. Imagine your teacher ****ing stuff up and sitting in the corner.. while he can have Dual Screen with the 27" (or 23") in his desk on a 45° angle while the beamer shows exactly the same thing in a huge format for the rest of the college?

Or am I wrong?

thenetavenger said,


This is like people that complain about a 'stylus' or other alternative input modalities, yet have no experience with them, so they respond, "Fire bad, grr arg."

Exactly... like Stylus failed, the same will happen on Touch for most PC monitors. I don't think any sane person other than some fanbois, and rich guys who don't know any better way to spend their money, would go buy such a monitor for traditional PC usage.

Samsung has the power to experimentally release such projects. They will see how viable would be to keep producing such monitors and they will act accordingly. For special cases might work, but will it be viable? Don't tell me you're going to buy one while you mostly play games, music, movies, work etc...

I don't think my arms would reach the 15 feet I have my monitor at, besides, I wouldn't want finger prints on it. I come close to killing people when they put their fingers on it.

LUTZIFER said,
I don't think my arms would reach the 15 feet I have my monitor at, besides, I wouldn't want finger prints on it. I come close to killing people when they put their fingers on it.

I'm guessing most people do not sit 15 feet away from their monitor

LUTZIFER said,
I don't think my arms would reach the 15 feet I have my monitor at, besides, I wouldn't want finger prints on it. I come close to killing people when they put their fingers on it.

23" monitor at 15feet, even with 20/10 eyesight, this would be a rather limited computing experience without shoving the scaling up 400%.

So either you are being silly, or you have a much larger screen which is irrelevant to this topic. Use a Kinect or other motion based tracking device for touch on theatre size displays.

I thought that was the big thing, sitting on your couch controlling everything.
I guess some people still do it the old way. Me, I like my media on the big screen.

I have a samsung 27" right now (no not touch based) its 70 cm away. I think its nice? any further away it would leave me feeling everything is too small.

I guess that Samsung (it's not only Samsung, I find other touch-monitors with the same) think that the user should put the Keyboard direct in front of the tilt Monitor.
From the Samsung Website: "offering a 60-degree tilt for comfortable use of the touch Display"

Buttus said,
is it just me, or doesn't everyone sit too far away from their monitor to touch it?

Well back in the days or radiation and worrying about MPRII standards, ya, people didn't stick their face into a monitor.

However, most desktop users often place their monitor, especially if touch enabled easily in arms reach.

Additionally, when a user is setting up a desktop or home workstation with a touch monitor, they often design the space around the 'touch' aspect of the monitor, so it is angled 'more' than traditional monitors and become more 'integrated' or appliance like in its nature.

Right now there are still some people with an 'aversion' to touch monitors and don't exercise any creative use or imagination.

Buttus said,
is it just me, or doesn't everyone sit too far away from their monitor to touch it?

Pretty much all desktop users would agree with you. Its just Microsoft trying to tell users how to use their devices, instead of listening to how they want to use them

These touch monitors will fail in the marketplace, same as the previous ones did 8-10 years ago.

About the only place they will end up, would be in the touch screen kiosks in shopping centres

You guys don't think ahead much do you? You could mount the display on a wall and have it be an interactive point for your family. Much like the original "Surface" not PixelSense. In work places, it could help with collaboration and presentations. There are tons of uses outside the traditional desktop scenario.

thenetavenger said,

Well back in the days or radiation and worrying about MPRII standards, ya, people didn't stick their face into a monitor.

However, most desktop users often place their monitor, especially if touch enabled easily in arms reach.

Additionally, when a user is setting up a desktop or home workstation with a touch monitor, they often design the space around the 'touch' aspect of the monitor, so it is angled 'more' than traditional monitors and become more 'integrated' or appliance like in its nature.

Right now there are still some people with an 'aversion' to touch monitors and don't exercise any creative use or imagination.

I have yet to see a single desktop user design their desk to be focused on the touch monitors. Push for it all you want, say everything should be done like this, but end of the day the keyboard and mouse still completely dominant the desktop and workstation, and its going to stay like that for a long time regardless of what Microsoft wants to happen. Laptops and tablets are one thing, but the desktop isn't going to change.

that's what makes windows 8 on a desktop so great to these people, a filthy screen with finger prints all over it. here, lets jamb this sandwich in the dvd tray, it's windows 8.

I am Reid said,

I have yet to see a single desktop user design their desk to be focused on the touch monitors. Push for it all you want, say everything should be done like this, but end of the day the keyboard and mouse still completely dominant the desktop and workstation, and its going to stay like that for a long time regardless of what Microsoft wants to happen. Laptops and tablets are one thing, but the desktop isn't going to change.


I could use it with a second monitor and do most things on my existing one. It'd be interesting.

I had a touch capable AIO box with win7, never used it that way naturally since win7 and touch isn't that impressive.

I like to work much of the time standing up. If I could just reach out and touch the screen instead of hunching to grab the mouse it would help a lot.

I am Reid said,

I have yet to see a single desktop user design their desk to be focused on the touch monitors. Push for it all you want, say everything should be done like this, but end of the day the keyboard and mouse still completely dominant the desktop and workstation, and its going to stay like that for a long time regardless of what Microsoft wants to happen. Laptops and tablets are one thing, but the desktop isn't going to change.

http://sphotos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/...3445632432_1004159938_n.jpg

thomastmc said,
I like to work much of the time standing up. If I could just reach out and touch the screen instead of hunching to grab the mouse it would help a lot.

Them pesky hemorrhoids still playing up i see /only jesting.