Samsung wins the right to view the Apple/HTC licensing deal

Oh Samsung, things might be starting to go your way. Following Apple and HTC entering into a 10 year patent licensing deal, Samsung have won the right to view the details of that deal.

Samsung has said that they are “almost certain” that the Apple/HTC deal will contain information that is relevant to their on-going fight with Apple in the US courts, and they should be allowed to view the information and draw comparisons. And for once a US judge agrees with Samsung, ordering Apple to reveal the agreement in full, immediately. Although, according to Reuters, the full agreement will only be viewed by attorneys-eyes-only.

At the time, the details were kept quiet by both HTC and Apple, but speculation and rumour has HTC tipped to pay Apple between $6 and $8 for every smartphone they produce; HTC has already responded to the speculation as an "outrageous number" but does also point out they were happy with the outcome of their deal.

With appeals and countersuits in motion from both Apple and Samsung’s legal camps, this could be the turning point in the patent wars between the two.

Source: ZDNet

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Apple is clearly losing in the mobile market, and rather than embracing healthy competition by opening iOS up to OEMs in order to bring fresh and innovative features to an otherwise stale product line plus reap licensing benefits, they chose to sue their competitors across the lake over frivolous claims (e.g. the shape of a device, swipe to unlock).

Look at Android: It's on phones and tablets, and also refrigerators, watches, printers, cars, and a plethora of other third-party hardware. Android isn't only winning in the mobile market, it's expanding itself into other vertical markets. Linux (through Android) became more relevant than Apple in just 4 years, and not just in the niche markets that Apple plays in, either, but in markets that continue to be untouched by Apple's presence.

One thing Microsoft has learned through all this is that OS migration does not happen over night. It took two years, from release, for Windows 7 to overtake Windows XP's market share. So, with Windows 8 they have released an OS that will meet the needs of a future market. It's a smart move. More companies today are driving touch-based devices into businesses, and as those businesses evolve they will be more likely to re-invest in companies like Microsoft who bring the software and services that they need and are familiar with, and that can carry some kind of compatibility with their enterprise applications across all their devices.

Investors are quickly realizing this, and Apple stock is suffering because of it. Apple simply can't think outside the iBox.

Look at Android phones. Locked down with Bloatware from the Cell phone manufacturers. NO wonder people have to hack into the OS to remove that crap. Open iOS and that will happen. NO benefits.

Each market has their low quality "rip offs" and Android is no exception.


bkellner said,
Apple is clearly losing in the mobile market, and rather than embracing healthy competition by opening iOS up to OEMs in order to bring fresh and innovative features to an otherwise stale product line plus reap licensing benefits, they chose to sue their competitors across the lake over frivolous claims (e.g. the shape of a device, swipe to unlock).

Look at Android: It's on phones and tablets, and also refrigerators, watches, printers, cars, and a plethora of other third-party hardware. Android isn't only winning in the mobile market, it's expanding itself into other vertical markets. Linux (through Android) became more relevant than Apple in just 4 years, and not just in the niche markets that Apple plays in, either, but in markets that continue to be untouched by Apple's presence.

One thing Microsoft has learned through all this is that OS migration does not happen over night. It took two years, from release, for Windows 7 to overtake Windows XP's market share. So, with Windows 8 they have released an OS that will meet the needs of a future market. It's a smart move. More companies today are driving touch-based devices into businesses, and as those businesses evolve they will be more likely to re-invest in companies like Microsoft who bring the software and services that they need and are familiar with, and that can carry some kind of compatibility with their enterprise applications across all their devices.

Investors are quickly realizing this, and Apple stock is suffering because of it. Apple simply can't think outside the iBox.

NeoPogo said,
Look at Android phones. Locked down with Bloatware from the Cell phone manufacturers. NO wonder people have to hack into the OS to remove that crap. Open iOS and that will happen. NO benefits.

Each market has their low quality "rip offs" and Android is no exception.


Although I do not agree with the OP, you are incorrect that this is a direct path to bloatware.

WP7/WP8 devices fit the profile the OP suggests, and it is not encumbered with bloatware, and users can easily uninstall any preinstalled MFR/Carrier Apps.

Android not only is designed for custom ROMs from MFRs with their bloatware, but even Google itself locks Apps that cannot be uninstalled easily. (The first year or so of Android I got tired of ripping Amazon MP3 off of friends phones, since it was not 'user' removable.)

bkellner said,
Apple is clearly losing in the mobile market, and rather than embracing healthy competition by opening iOS up to OEMs in order to bring fresh and innovative features to an otherwise stale product line plus reap licensing benefits, they chose to sue their competitors across the lake over frivolous claims (e.g. the shape of a device, swipe to unlock).

Look at Android: It's on phones and tablets, and also refrigerators, watches, printers, cars, and a plethora of other third-party hardware. Android isn't only winning in the mobile market, it's expanding itself into other vertical markets. Linux (through Android) became more relevant than Apple in just 4 years, and not just in the niche markets that Apple plays in, either, but in markets that continue to be untouched by Apple's presence.

One thing Microsoft has learned through all this is that OS migration does not happen over night. It took two years, from release, for Windows 7 to overtake Windows XP's market share. So, with Windows 8 they have released an OS that will meet the needs of a future market. It's a smart move. More companies today are driving touch-based devices into businesses, and as those businesses evolve they will be more likely to re-invest in companies like Microsoft who bring the software and services that they need and are familiar with, and that can carry some kind of compatibility with their enterprise applications across all their devices.

Investors are quickly realizing this, and Apple stock is suffering because of it. Apple simply can't think outside the iBox.

If Android or Linux had a more advanced OS model, you would have a good argument. However, it has a shelf life, just like iOS products. In the ever faster growing age of technology Android nor Linux can keep up with the hardware and software demands it is hitting today, let alone systems that will exist 5 years from now.

This is where relying on the more generic *nix OS model and rather poorly implemented Dalvik JVM will crush itself by continually adding on 'bandages' to allow access to hardware and try to maintain any software compatibility.

It is amazing that something like Linux lived on past the early 90s, because the time it was created, EVERYONE was dumping their *nix code and trying to move on to newer and richer OS models. However with the success of Linux, everyone decided to keep poking their dead horse with a stick, even after they had dumped it to public domain.

There is a reason *nix was outdated in the early 90s and was too generic for more complex hardware and software models, and each year this continues to show more and more. Even Apple has hit problems and limits and had to remove OS features because the *nix model doesn't handle it well, and becomes bloated rather fast when adding in more security and isolation technologies.

Sure Linux and Android have made inroads, but it hasn't progressed faster than Windows, which you and many other forget is also running in switches/routers and cars and refrigerators and cable modems and a lot of device people never would notice. Windows Embedded NT and CE are massive players in the world, and with Windows 8 Embedded, the lower RAM and faster performance move it into devices a generation earlier than anticipated.

Apple is horrible at long term and sustainable product lines and income, but Android and Linux is not any better due to fundamental core flaws that will require a new OS model and new kernel model to replace it in the upcoming years of technology progression.

We have already see Linux stop offering features easily available by Windows and these will continue to grow until Linux is redesigned, which might never happen as long as people keep putting duck tape and bandaids on it and shoving it into hardware architectures that it doesn't fit.

The strange thing, is I wish the world would wake up and create an OSS OS to replace Linux and dump the *nix roots, because if they don't in 10 years Microsoft won't have any competition. NT is a matrix layered, object based OS, and is generations ahead of Linux, and NT is 20 years old. How many decades before we see these technologies or levels of extensibility or portability in an OSS OS?


lmaobox said,

Well, you are the stupid.

lolwut? Where to even start with this... actually **** it, it speaks for itself

Teebor said,

lolwut? Where to even start with this... actually **** it, it speaks for itself

Over your head, his sarcasm it went.