"Save TechNet" petition reaches 10,000 signatures as August 31st deadline looms

Microsoft will end new subscriptions to its TechNet software developer service in just a few days, but an online petition that was started to try and convince the company to change its mind is still taking signatures in a last ditch effort.

The petition on the Change.org site launched soon after Microsoft announced last month that it would no longer take new subscriptions to TechNet after August 31st. Today, the petition requesting Microsoft continue TechNet reached and exceeded the 10,000-signature mark. However, it's unlikely that Microsoft will change its position at the point. Neowin got a "No comment" from a Microsoft spokesperson when we contacted them about the online petition reaching the 10,000-signature level.

In its original announcement in July, Microsoft said that it has seen "a usage shift from paid to free evaluation experiences and resources" and that was a factor in retiring TechNet. While Microsoft still has the MSDN subscription service, its prices are much higher than TechNet. The Change.org petition states that Microsoft should continue TechNet or launch a cheaper alternative to MSDN. It added, "IT Professionals and ISVs need affordable access to Microsoft products normally accessed through TechNet."

Microsoft will continue to honor all current TechNet subscriptions until they conclude. People who purchase or renew their subscriptions by August 31st must fully activate them by September 30th.

Source: Change.org | Image via Change.org

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My section of my enterprise involves configuration management. We do not currently use System Center but could, its kinda our decision with our current solution going EOL soon. If my team went System Center and pushed for more Enterprise versions of Windows, it may push us to get a full million dollar Enterprise Agreement with MS.

Instead, we are pushing not to go with Microsoft because we just do not like how they are treating the Sys/Ops of late, their pushiness to get people on Azure for everything, etc.

The decisions that Microsoft make, no matter how small, have ripple effects. I am just not a happy MS customer of late.

I could care less if they go away. Technet has become worse and worse every year. Their latest BS with the new rules last year was the last straw for me. I'd also be willing to bet very few people renewed with them this year due to that.

Its Microsoft stealing from customers, with their high price and temporary software.

I signed it back when it was new. Doubt it will have any affect but nice to show MS there is wide scale support for it. My sub expires in Sep but luckily I get to subscribe for another year.

I'm assuming you have to be a current subscriber to petition for saving TechNet subscriptions?
Or did 10,000 14-year-olds just sign up?

Well in all fairness, if you were using TechNet for Office, then Office 365 Home Premium is not a bad deal. I don't think I would subscribe to that though. I still have Office installed, but I rarely use it. Google Docs handles most of my document needs, and the rare times when I need to use local software, LibreOffice should do okay.

As far as servers go, I recently converted my home server from Windows Server to Ubuntu, and it's been working very well. For a desktop OS, I've done some testing and Linux gets me a lot further than it use to, but I still find myself booting to Windows often. I guess $139 for an OEM copy isn't that bad. I just won't be as upgrade-happy when a new version comes out. And even still, the need for Windows is gradually declining so ultimately I don't think the lack of TechNet will be that big of a deal.

No need to boot in the virtual age. Run both at the same time. Although I find Ubuntu a laughably bad desktop with no applications. I use Debian for my servers because they don't mess it up in the pointless endeavour to copy Windows.

Spicoli said,
No need to boot in the virtual age. Run both at the same time. Although I find Ubuntu a laughably bad desktop with no applications. I use Debian for my servers because they don't mess it up in the pointless endeavour to copy Windows.

Virtualization has its place, but not for your primary-use operating system. I don't want to put virtualized hardware limitations on either OS. And how exactly is Ubuntu Server trying to copy Windows? You boot up to a shell and install whatever Linux services you want. I actually considered Debian for my home server since the difference from Ubuntu Server is not that much, but went with Ubuntu since it gets more frequent updates. Now if you're talking about Ubuntu Desktop, then I'm no fan of Unity either. I use Cinnamon, and I've found it to work quite nicely.

Why do I get a sense that MS is trying to alienate all of their customers over the past year? Between the loopy XBone and Kinect launch, RT, TechNet, and Win 8.1 RT silliness I just don't know what to make of their strategy at the moment. It seems like when they could not make any more wacky decisions, they manage to find one more.

I use TechNet constantly in my work, and have had a subscription for over a decade. Genius, pure genius, MS.

They're releasing the Previews and stuff ahead of time, and products have free evaluation periods. There is no REAL need for Technet, for the most part.

farmeunit said,
They're releasing the Previews and stuff ahead of time, and products have free evaluation periods. There is no REAL need for Technet, for the most part.

Preview is still preview, not the final version. Take our work for example, testing on a preview version is useless, because issues that are fine now may be broken in the final version, and issues that are broken now may be fixed in the final version.

For large companies sure there is MSDN, but TechNet was never focused at those loaded with cash, this move alienates them from a lot of small time companies.

farmeunit said,
That's what the evaluations are for. 90 days. That's the final version.

Once 90 days is up, re-install. The point is that Technet was for promotion and testing. Not for everyday use.

It even says so right on this page: http://technet.microsoft.com/e...subscriptions/bb892759.aspx

There's plenty of people who, strictly speaking, violated their TechNet license by using the products in a live environment, but at the very least MS still got their money. How many of those people do they think will now purchase a license for each product individually?

I suspect the losses will far exceed the gains. Only time will tell.

farmeunit said,
That's what the evaluations are for. 90 days. That's the final version.

Once 90 days is up, re-install. The point is that Technet was for promotion and testing. Not for everyday use.

It even says so right on this page: http://technet.microsoft.com/e...subscriptions/bb892759.aspx


Your wrong. The only thing you couldn't use it for was in a live business setting.

Plus they kept changing the rules EVERY year, making it worse and worse.

People paid good money for this, its not like they got it for free like so many people try to imply.

Dot Matrix said,
10,000 signatures isn't going to save it.

Maybe if they pledged a certain dollar amount with it? $1,000 each or something?