Skype drops development for Windows Phone 7

WMPoweruser has pointed us to an article on Smarthouse that brings up some disappointing news for the Windows Mobile community. Due in time for the holidays, Microsoft's new Windows Phone 7 platform will bring a whole new look and feel to the world of mobile computing. Unfortunately, it seems that Skype won't be a part of the user experience.

According to the article, Skype's Asia Pacific Vice President, Dan Neary, has announced at an event in Sydney, that the company is not developing a mobile version of its software for the Windows Phone 7 platform. Instead, they are going to be focusing their resources on devices running the iPhone OS, as well as Android.

Skype isn't the first company to announce such a thing. Back in March, we saw Mozilla drop its Windows Phone 7 development plans for Firefox mobile, citing a problem creating software for a platform that doesn't allow the development of applications running native code. Skype has yet to make a formal declaration as to why they've actually dropped support for the platform, but many seem to feel that it has to do with the same problem. It seems that not everyone is down with only developing on Silverlight and XNA.

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Give the windows phone back its ability to run third party apps, ability to be used as removeable storage etc and I might be interested in this.. but for now i'm looking at android for my new phone - even after being a huge fan of previous windows mobile releases - this is a massive let down so far

WHAT? Windows Phone 7 doesn't support native code?!?! Like... does that mean it won't do Java? Most phones at least run Java games and apps. Come on Microsoft, get on the ball dammit! First I cite the interface and now this...
Maybe the Windows Phone will be good to put under an ice cold beverage?

C&P from Engadget
Update: Looks like this quote might've been taken out of context. MobileTechWorld followed up and learned that while Dan Neary left out Windows Mobile and Windows Phone from a list of currently supported platforms (which makes sense, since one is dying and the other isn't out yet), he said Windows Phone 7 "is on the roadmap." The question seems to be more of a "when" than an "if" they'll start building it.

Makes a load of sense not to even mention it.

Winmo7 v1 is going to suck. Winmo 7.1 will rock. Seriously I love MS stuff, just not version 1 of MS stuff. When has MS ever got a version 1 of anything right the 1st time? I got the HD2 BECAUSE it has winmo 6.5. Winmo 6.5 has billions of apps is pretty rock solid and just about anything works on it. Winmo 7 means nothing works on it and until devs actually write for it it is going to be a zune all over again. Great hardware and ok software and no apps <> great phone. Apple' Icrap is only awesome for one reason. The apps. If MS would take a page out of Apple's playbook and remember the old days when it was all about "developers,developers,developers" and make it "cool" to program for then there might be hope for Winmo7. Until then give me Winmo6.5 and touchflo 3d

I don't think martketshare has anything to do with it. The article states that they're concentrating efforts on iPhone and Android, platforms that they already have apps out for. If this was about marketshare, BlackBerry and Symbien would be on that list as well....and they aren't.

If developers of Skype would work with Microsoft, they could get access to native code (as they are going to give it to 'preferred partners' and OEMs). I think the true reason for dropping WinMo Skype is that it is very slow, memory hungry, and eats huge amounts of data (it definitely is on Windows Mobile 6). I think they just want to drop it to avoid further embarrassment.

The WM7 os just looks too cluttered and "teeny". Dunno, it just doesn't seem to be for me.
Im sure skype will jump right back into making an app when they see WM7 become a bigger contender, but until then, they might be doing the right thing...

shakey said,
The WM7 os just looks too cluttered and "teeny". Dunno, it just doesn't seem to be for me.
Im sure skype will jump right back into making an app when they see WM7 become a bigger contender, but until then, they might be doing the right thing...

- 1

It may look that way in screenshots and mockup designs.. but watch it in action or wait till you use it yourself.. it's much more fluid and it makes more sense and is very user-friendly.

Skype has yet to make a formal declaration as to why they've actually dropped support for the platform


Well yeah. It's not exactly professional to come right out and say "we're putting consumers in a position of us vs. Windows Phone 7 and we're just arrogant enough to think we'll win that battle".


Hhmmm... Skype or Windows Phone 7? Tough "call"...

C_Guy said,
Skype has yet to make a formal declaration as to why they've actually dropped support for the platform


Well yeah. It's not exactly professional to come right out and say "we're putting consumers in a position of us vs. Windows Phone 7 and we're just arrogant enough to think we'll win that battle".


Hhmmm... Skype or Windows Phone 7? Tough "call"...

LOL

thealexweb said,
First Mozilla, now Skype whos' gonna be next, Windows Phone 7 is sinking before it can take off.

Why would someone use Skype or Firefox on a Windows Phone 7 device? Heck, I see no reason to use them on my Windows 7 machines either.

pezzonovante said,

Why would someone use Skype or Firefox on a Windows Phone 7 device? Heck, I see no reason to use them on my Windows 7 machines either.

The main point is that this a major vote of no confidence in Windows Phone, developers pulling out now is very bad news for MS and they've only got themselves to blame.

thealexweb said,

The main point is that this a major vote of no confidence in Windows Phone, developers pulling out now is very bad news for MS and they've only got themselves to blame.

im glad someone gets it!

thealexweb said,

The main point is that this a major vote of no confidence in Windows Phone, developers pulling out now is very bad news for MS and they've only got themselves to blame.

With Windows Phone 7, every .NET developer has become a Windows Phone developer. There are thousands of .NET developers around the world. C# is the fastest growing programming language. So, finding developers for Windows Phone 7 will never be an issue.

Edited by pezzonovante, May 13 2010, 5:39pm :

pezzonovante said,

With Windows Phone 7, every .NET developer has become a Windows Phone developer. There are thousands of .NET developers around the world. C# is the fastest growing programming language. So, finding developers for Windows Phone 7 will never be an issue.

No development for native apps sucks tho.

thealexweb said,

The main point is that this a major vote of no confidence in Windows Phone, developers pulling out now is very bad news for MS and they've only got themselves to blame.

Uhhhh, no. This isn't even official, there's been an update and skypes "offical stance" is that they're not talking about future platform development.

As for Firefox, who cares? They sat on their ass for, what was it? 2 years on a supposed WM6x version that never went anywhere, and that never had any "lack of native code" or "lack of mature APIs" or whatever other BS you can come up with. Fact is they couldn't get the damn thing working at all. And the beta of it on Android sucks just as bad I hear. They should just leave it to Opera and Skyfire.

Developer interest in WP7 is up compared to WM6x, it was shown about a month ago. Skype is a business, not some small 3rd party dev anyways.

fixxxer2010 said,
im glad someone gets it!

I think you're both wrong. This is not so much a vote of no confidence, it's a question of 'how the hell do i migrate my native app to managed Silverlight || XNA code'

In most cases, it doesn't make sense to port some applications to silverlight. In other cases, XNA just doesn't make sense for their particular app. That's the point. Applications that rely on a close tie to hardware will not be ported due to Microsoft's locked down abstraction of the hardware features.

Perhaps if the phone kicks off and becomes popular, then Microsoft will open more HW APIs to Silverlight developers, enabling these apps to be ported.

Until then, these companies can't figure out how to create compelling and competing apps that run within the silverlgiht/XNA frameworks so they are admitting defeat by announcing their retreat from the platform.

thealexweb said,

The main point is that this a major vote of no confidence in Windows Phone, developers pulling out now is very bad news for MS and they've only got themselves to blame.

+ 1

dotf said,

I think you're both wrong. This is not so much a vote of no confidence, it's a question of 'how the hell do i migrate my native app to managed Silverlight || XNA code'

In most cases, it doesn't make sense to port some applications to silverlight. In other cases, XNA just doesn't make sense for their particular app. That's the point. Applications that rely on a close tie to hardware will not be ported due to Microsoft's locked down abstraction of the hardware features.

Perhaps if the phone kicks off and becomes popular, then Microsoft will open more HW APIs to Silverlight developers, enabling these apps to be ported.

Until then, these companies can't figure out how to create compelling and competing apps that run within the silverlgiht/XNA frameworks so they are admitting defeat by announcing their retreat from the platform.

Umm.. MS has a lot of content up on their Visual Studio 2010 site and their development sites on creating content for Windows Phone 7... There's even a free Express edition of the Win Phone 7 development that developers can use. There's lots of API information as well.. and more will come as the year goes by. It definitely is the people's confidence... they don't adapt easy to change.. and I'm actually glad MS is making this game-changer phone.. and I'm confident they'll market it well this time around.

GP007 said,

Uhhhh, no. This isn't even official, there's been an update and skypes "offical stance" is that they're not talking about future platform development.

As for Firefox, who cares? They sat on their ass for, what was it? 2 years on a supposed WM6x version that never went anywhere, and that never had any "lack of native code" or "lack of mature APIs" or whatever other BS you can come up with. Fact is they couldn't get the damn thing working at all. And the beta of it on Android sucks just as bad I hear. They should just leave it to Opera and Skyfire.

Developer interest in WP7 is up compared to WM6x, it was shown about a month ago. Skype is a business, not some small 3rd party dev anyways.

Yeah, You can't really base anything on Mozilla here. Their mobile strategy makes no sense. At one point they released an Alpha of a WinMo version of Fenec (Which should have stayed named Fenec) and not only was the thing HUGE, but I couldn't even open it after install... They really need a refresh in their Mobile group. Or scrap it entirely if they don't have the resources to devote to it (Which is what I suspect).

M_Lyons10 said,
...
It was an alpha. What did you expect? They can't develop for Win7, because Fx isn't coded in a way that makes it porting a reasonable job.

Their mobile versions for other platforms are coming along fairly nicely, however.

C_Guy said,
fascinating since Windows Phone 7 isn't even out yet.

And that means something why? The majority of cellphone users are not power users. They buy which ever phone is the cheapest or most appealing when their contract is up. Most will not go and spent a $200+ for a new phone just because of a new operating system. They wait for their contracts to end so they can get the discounted prices and get the same phone for less than $100. That means that if the market is filled with iPhone/Android phones, it will take 2 years before WP7 can even make an attempt to get into the market. If you want proof of that, look at how long it took the Andriod OS to overtake the iPhone.

Edited by SputnikGamer, May 13 2010, 6:44pm :

SputnikGamer said,

If you want proof of that, look at how long it took the Andriod OS to overtake the iPhone.

That's because there weren't many phones with Android at the start, but they slowly increased. But MS has contracts already, this is not Windows Phone 1, it's called 7 for a reason. It will have lots of phones on release, thus making the catch up a lot faster.

Glendi said,

That's because there weren't many phones with Android at the start, but they slowly increased. But MS has contracts already, this is not Windows Phone 1, it's called 7 for a reason. It will have lots of phones on release, thus making the catch up a lot faster.

It will help it catch up being on more phones at launch no doubt but it will still be limited by the speed on which peoples phones are up for a discounted price. I wanted the iPhone when it came out but I still waited a year before buying it because I didn't want to pay the out of contract price which was like 300 or 400 at the time. I got it for $99 a year after it came out when the phone/contract I had was up for renewal. The point I was making above is that by it not being out yet, more and more people are getting on iPhone and Android devices. We just had a new iPhone a year ago and rumors are back up for the next gen device. Android devices are coming out weekly. If the new Windows OS doesn't come out soon, everyone will be on brand new iPhones and Androids and not want to replace them with an out of contract phone for $200 or $300 other than the MS fanboys..

Edited by SputnikGamer, May 14 2010, 3:59am :

This pretty much signals the end (before it even began) of Windows Mobile 7. The truth is, and it hurts, it is pretty much an iPhone Vs Android war. The others contenders, which maybe the exception of Blackberry are as good as done.

bluarash said,
This pretty much signals the end (before it even began) of Windows Mobile 7. The truth is, and it hurts, it is pretty much an iPhone Vs Android war. The others contenders, which maybe the exception of Blackberry are as good as done.

Did Android or iPhones OS have Skype at their very start?

bluarash said,
This pretty much signals the end (before it even began) of Windows Mobile 7. The truth is, and it hurts, it is pretty much an iPhone Vs Android war. The others contenders, which maybe the exception of Blackberry are as good as done.
Amazing that you can deduce that from a single application.

bluarash said,
This pretty much signals the end (before it even began) of Windows Mobile 7. The truth is, and it hurts, it is pretty much an iPhone Vs Android war. The others contenders, which maybe the exception of Blackberry are as good as done.

you don't know about corporate market don't you. the fact is they don't choose what's cool or fashionable or facebook twitter etc integration. say a company runs sharepoint, microsoft dynamics or microsoft's cloud stuff, no matter how ugly win mobile is, they just performs natively and exclusively with business apps. now that's the key in business purchasing decisions.

bluarash said,
This pretty much signals the end (before it even began) of Windows Mobile 7. The truth is, and it hurts, it is pretty much an iPhone Vs Android war. The others contenders, which maybe the exception of Blackberry are as good as done.

-1000000000

Hercules said,
Amazing that you can deduce that from a single application.

Yeah, I can't think of ANY application that would be able to just end a mobile OS's abilities to compete even before it releases... Silly.

Wow, did I hurt someone's feelings or what. To go over this again. Business is supply and demand. There is no demand for Windows Mobile (as of yet). Given historic trends, I would venture to guess never. Maybe I am wrong, I don't care either way. What I was saying by withdrawing of a semi-critical app is that they don't believe their is a market for this product. I agree. I think Microsoft is late to this generation of Mobile phones. They need to stay with the WinMo 6 series of overpriced and worthless business phones for those unable to setup their own exchange mail.

As for a discussion on Microsoft's cloud infrastructure. What I see is a lot of hype, a bit of mix-match of services (many of the concepts very dated) and almost no results.

+1000000000 (good, now my karma is restored to normal)

bluarash said,
What I was saying by withdrawing of a semi-critical app is that they don't believe their is a market for this product. I agree. I think Microsoft is late to this generation of Mobile phones. They need to stay with the WinMo 6 series of overpriced and worthless business phones for those unable to setup their own exchange mail.

But if you had read anything, you'd know this is about writing the app in Silverlight and XNA, and not about the bs market thing you mention, which is illogical in many ways.

bluarash said,
This pretty much signals the end (before it even began) of Windows Mobile 7. The truth is, and it hurts, it is pretty much an iPhone Vs Android war. The others contenders, which maybe the exception of Blackberry are as good as done.

Right, because a phone lives or dies based on whether or not it can Skype, right?

Glendi said,

But if you had read anything, you'd know this is about writing the app in Silverlight and XNA, and not about the bs market thing you mention, which is illogical in many ways.

It is always about market share. If you have a market you can dictate the terms and conditions. If you don't, you can't. Apple has this market. Google Android is the only serious competitor. No one wants to develop for Windows mobile. This is not the first or second vendor to back out. Hell, the article mentions Mozilla.

Again, it is not the phone living or dieing with Skype, but rather the refusal of vendors to go along with XNA and Silver-slight tied framework for what they see as an insignificant market share.

I'm fairly sure if MS releases WM7 the right way this time, and it's what it seems like it's cracked up to be (which seems pretty decent) Skype will jump on board.

Odd thing is, do you think that now the need for Skype not to be able to easily code for iPhone due to their developer restrictions makes them think their mobile versions will cost more?

I'm not sure how much value there is in a voice chat program on a phone anyway. Wouldn't it be easier just to call the person?

GreyWolf said,
I'm not sure how much value there is in a voice chat program on a phone anyway. Wouldn't it be easier just to call the person?

Depends if it is an international call. I believe international calls on Skype are free....or at least dont cost as much.

GreyWolf said,
I'm not sure how much value there is in a voice chat program on a phone anyway. Wouldn't it be easier just to call the person?

Exactly. In most places data connections are terribly unstable/slow or they have huge latencies. A normal call > data call at all times on a mobile phone.

GreyWolf said,
I'm not sure how much value there is in a voice chat program on a phone anyway. Wouldn't it be easier just to call the person?

skype is pretty widely used and popular.

fixxxer2010 said,

skype is pretty widely used and popular.

When the target for a call is NOT a phone (a computer, for example). When the target is another phone, unless the data rate is cheaper than the voice rate (which is true usually only for international calls, and even those rates are headed down thanks to agreements and bundle deals), a voice call using voice circuits will be cheaper than a voice call using data circuits.

fixxxer2010 said,

skype is pretty widely used and popular.


I have yet to someone using it on an iphone. And I know at least 20-40 people who has an iphone.

GreyWolf said,
I'm not sure how much value there is in a voice chat program on a phone anyway. Wouldn't it be easier just to call the person?

Calling friends in other countries I would guess

zagor said,

I have yet to someone using it on an iphone. And I know at least 20-40 people who has an iphone.

20-40 who have an iPhone. Not "has".

Edited by LiquidSolstice, May 13 2010, 11:56pm :

GreyWolf said,
I'm not sure how much value there is in a voice chat program on a phone anyway. Wouldn't it be easier just to call the person?

LOL! Have you not heard of this thingy called VoIP and how it can let people have nearly free calls compared to traditional phone calls?

zagor said,

I have yet to someone using it on an iphone. And I know at least 20-40 people who has an iphone.

because :
a) is transparent (sometimes you don't know if a people is using skype or doing a classic call).
b) is widely used for long distance calls / international calls.

leo221 said,
ok fine. if win 7 phones gains a big market share back, they jump right in.

Exactly. Why develop and support a platform that isnt even released and proven yet. If WM7 becomes popular, they will develop and app for it.

Edited by techbeck, May 13 2010, 3:25pm :

techbeck said,

Exactly. Why develop and support a platform that isnt even released and proven yet. If WM7 becomes popular, they will develop and app for it.

Because they know, as a software company, more than you do, about the outcome of WP7.

leo221 said,
ok fine. if win 7 phones gains a big market share back, they jump right in.

in case you haven't noticed there isn't a ton of interest in wp7. it doesn't surprise me that alot of devs will not develop for it. most users are defecting to android anyways.

fixxxer2010 said,

in case you haven't noticed there isn't a ton of interest in wp7. it doesn't surprise me that alot of devs will not develop for it. most users are defecting to android anyways.

thanks for letting me know

fixxxer2010 said,

in case you haven't noticed there isn't a ton of interest in wp7. it doesn't surprise me that alot of devs will not develop for it. most users are defecting to android anyways.

Sorry but you Sir are wrong..Win 7 phone have generate alot of buzz.

codename.venice said,

Cant see much of this buzz anywhere..

Because you only look at gadget/phone sites that keep talking about something else every min? Sites like Engadget and Gizmodo are for people with ADD.

It's early in the WP7 process, and unless you're a developer, there's nothing much to talk about. That doesn't mean there's nothing going on though.

GP007 said,

Because you only look at gadget/phone sites that keep talking about something else every min? Sites like Engadget and Gizmodo are for people with ADD.

It's early in the WP7 process, and unless you're a developer, there's nothing much to talk about. That doesn't mean there's nothing going on though.

+1

Windows Phone 7 has a LOT of interest.. you just won't find it on these medicore sites. And the buzz will definitely gain once more of the developement stuff is finalized.

GP007 said,

Because you only look at gadget/phone sites that keep talking about something else every min? Sites like Engadget and Gizmodo are for people with ADD.

It's early in the WP7 process, and unless you're a developer, there's nothing much to talk about. That doesn't mean there's nothing going on though.

+1

GP007 said,

Because you only look at gadget/phone sites that keep talking about something else every min? Sites like Engadget and Gizmodo are for people with ADD.

It's early in the WP7 process, and unless you're a developer, there's nothing much to talk about. That doesn't mean there's nothing going on though.

QFT

techbeck said,

Exactly. Why develop and support a platform that isnt even released and proven yet. If WM7 becomes popular, they will develop and app for it.

But the lack of software doesn't help to popularize wm7.

techbeck said,

Exactly. Why develop and support a platform that isnt even released and proven yet. If WM7 becomes popular, they will develop and app for it.

You mean like how they did for android??? The verizon only android crippleware doesn't count.

GP007 said,

Because you only look at gadget/phone sites that keep talking about something else every min? Sites like Engadget and Gizmodo are for people with ADD.

It's early in the WP7 process, and unless you're a developer, there's nothing much to talk about. That doesn't mean there's nothing going on though.


+1