Ubuntu 7.10 Final

Ubuntu is a community developed, linux-based operating system that is perfect for laptops, desktops and servers. It contains all the applications you need - a web browser, presentation, document and spreadsheet software, instant messaging and much more. Ubuntu is free software. With Ubuntu Desktop Edition you can surf the web, read email, create documents and spreadsheets, edit images and much more. Ubuntu has a fast and easy graphical installer right on the Desktop CD. On a typical computer the installation should take you less than 25 minutes.

The Ubuntu Promise

* Ubuntu will always be free of charge, including enterprise releases and security updates.
* Ubuntu comes with full commercial support from Canonical and hundreds of companies around the world.
* Ubuntu includes the very best translations and accessibility infrastructure that the free software community has to offer.
* Ubuntu CDs contain only free software applications; we encourage you to use free and open source software, improve it and pass it on.

Download: Ubuntu 7.10 Final
Link: Ubuntu Home Page

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zoonyx does make a point on one thing however imo, linux in general, and not only ubuntu isn't ready for the general pc using population..................................yet..

Sadly I have to agree - I've got a fairly good knowledge of Windows and can do the majority of geeky things, but when it comes to Linux i'm totally lost.
I have two more or less identical machines running Ubuntu in virtual machine environments, but for some reason the nvidia graphics driver will just not load on one of them - fine and dandy on the other tho I've struggled with the CLI (and I used to enjoy the glory days of DOS) and copy and pasted from websites and forums to my hearts content - but I just can't get it working, and I don't even know why. In Windows i'd know exactly what was going on and would have multiple solutions without ever having to think about typing obscure commands.

But then maybe i'm just a n00b!!

Pygmy_Hippo said,
Sadly I have to agree - I've got a fairly good knowledge of Windows and can do the majority of geeky things, but when it comes to Linux i'm totally lost.
I have two more or less identical machines running Ubuntu in virtual machine environments, but for some reason the nvidia graphics driver will just not load on one of them - fine and dandy on the other tho I've struggled with the CLI (and I used to enjoy the glory days of DOS) and copy and pasted from websites and forums to my hearts content - but I just can't get it working, and I don't even know why. In Windows i'd know exactly what was going on and would have multiple solutions without ever having to think about typing obscure commands.

But then maybe i'm just a n00b!! :D

i gotta agree with you here, cause im pretty much the same ... with windows im pretty good overall. with linux, it's still to technical if something dont work right out of the box.

i dont think linux will be ready for mainstream for several more years.... my guess is it will never be as good/easy as windows is... cause unless they change it's complex commands to something more windows like... it will never take off in the mainstream if you ask me.

I used to be in the same boat as you two, but that was before I switched to OS X. OS X helped my learn Linux in a flash, because most of the tinkering around I had to do in the terminal on OS X, I could do in Linux.

Yep,
That CLI sucks for anybody that hasn't spent the majority of their life in front of a Linux box and is EXACTLY the reason I have to keep Windows on my machines! Otherwise, the stuff that you can do just like in Windows, is just as good as, if not better, in Linux/Ubuntu.

ThaCrip said,

i gotta agree with you here, cause im pretty much the same ... with windows im pretty good overall. with linux, it's still to technical if something dont work right out of the box.

i dont think linux will be ready for mainstream for several more years.... my guess is it will never be as good/easy as windows is... cause unless they change it's complex commands to something more windows like... it will never take off in the mainstream if you ask me.

yep +1 some things in linux are just way more complicated than they need to be...

Still ill be having a play with this version

Pygmy_Hippo said,
Sadly I have to agree - I've got a fairly good knowledge of Windows and can do the majority of geeky things, but when it comes to Linux i'm totally lost.
I have two more or less identical machines running Ubuntu in virtual machine environments, but for some reason the nvidia graphics driver will just not load on one of them - fine and dandy on the other tho I've struggled with the CLI (and I used to enjoy the glory days of DOS) and copy and pasted from websites and forums to my hearts content - but I just can't get it working, and I don't even know why. In Windows i'd know exactly what was going on and would have multiple solutions without ever having to think about typing obscure commands.

But then maybe i'm just a n00b!! :D

Virtual machines use a virtual video card, not the one in your system, and it usually ISN'T an ATI or nVidia. That's why it won't work. You have to install it in a real machine in order to get the FULL benefits. You can dual boot it along with Windows as long as Windows is installed first you can then install Ubuntu on a separate partition.

cork1958 said,
Yep,
That CLI sucks for anybody that hasn't spent the majority of their life in front of a Linux box and is EXACTLY the reason I have to keep Windows on my machines! Otherwise, the stuff that you can do just like in Windows, is just as good as, if not better, in Linux/Ubuntu.

The CLI is still a major part of Windows as well. That is why they kept it in there when they removed DOS......

Have you even tried this before criticizing? I've been using it since alpha, and you don't have to use a CLI in any way (even for flash/video/codecs). If this was Debian or some other distro, I would agree; but not with Ubuntu 7.10...

To me, there's only one thing left for Linux to become mainstream... Ubuntu being the easiest of all to use.

INSTALL PACKAGES!!!

You'd think after a millenium of development... the Linux community would create better install packages for Linux when it comes to singular installs. Just get the bloody installation AWAY from the Terminal. ( for you Window's newbs, that's Linux's "DOS" Command box ) :P

That's it... that's all I ask.

Gamers: yeah, they'll be the ones lining up with signs screaming Windows is the best. Then pile up on the forums causing internet roadblocks asking questions as to why DirectX can't be found, BSOD's back to the desktop... or how one vid card's driver has been causing more issues than the last one.

This comparison/debate is going to go on until the computer is a faded memory....

xMorpheousx416 said,
To me, there's only one thing left for Linux to become mainstream... Ubuntu being the easiest of all to use.

INSTALL PACKAGES!!!

You'd think after a millenium of development... the Linux community would create better install packages for Linux when it comes to singular installs. Just get the bloody installation AWAY from the Terminal. ( for you Window's newbs, that's Linux's "DOS" Command box ) :P

That's it... that's all I ask.

Gamers: yeah, they'll be the ones lining up with signs screaming Windows is the best. Then pile up on the forums causing internet roadblocks asking questions as to why DirectX can't be found, BSOD's back to the desktop... or how one vid card's driver has been causing more issues than the last one.

This comparison/debate is going to go on until the computer is a faded memory....


You dont need to use the command line to install applications. They have a GUI to do this. Synaptic or Adept depending on your desktop environment.

Some packages you can just right click on and install them.

It's easy to install apps through Synaptic or Adapt, but there really should only be one way to install an app. Have it like Windows where you just double click it to start or stick with the right click approach that some apps have. That way you're not searching for the package you want or having trouble trying to remember the commands that do it.

That the only thing that's ever really bugged me about Linux. I'm over it now, but still see the new users getting aggravated over it and remember how it annoyed me the same way.

Linux needs to solve the problem of DLL hell. Granted there not called DLLs on Linux. But all the dependencey are nuts. Windows has a core API and Linux has one as well. Just to many hands in the pot making reduntant things. No way should I not be able to uninstall openoffice and have my KDE desktop depend on it. Makes no sence. Theres also 2 many tools you need to setup the OS. Each little area is its own GUI app with no structure. Also to many programing things need to be installed depending on what program you want to use. They should just have a ALL option and not give the user a choice to get confused on.

i have been waiting for this , but my brodband is down and won't be back until next friday so i will have to wait :suspicious: ,anyway is it as good as it said ? the new thing ? , and if compiz is enabled from the start will beryl still work ?

Ubuntu also celebrates it 3rd Birthday 2morrow... Its interesting to note how popular its become in such a short period of time. I made some observation on the reasons of sucess and future of Ubuntu here

This is awesome news! I am so very happy about this release! I'm removing Vista from my laptop right now and preparing to install the latest release of Ubuntu on it. Version 7.10 has some remakable features except for Compiz. I think it's gimicky and doesn't have any practical use. bah!

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