Mozilla Prism Prototype Now Available on Mac and Linux

The Prism prototype is now available for Mac and Linux, on par with the updated version for Windows that resolves a few issues, meaning Prism now provides a cross-platform way to integrate the web platform with the desktop environment. Prism allows developers to desktop-enable their web applications and gives users the choice to use their favourite web apps in their browser, on their desktop of choice, or in both places. The team is also working on a simple way to open a web application in Prism directly from Firefox (no separate Prism download required).

Download Prism 0.8 for: Windows | Mac OS X | Linux
View: Mozilla Labs

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I guess this is sort of similar to what Adobe are up to with Apollo (and Flex), and to some extent MS with Silverlight and Sun with JavaFX: making an application platform where low-skilled developers can easily cobble together client-server widgets with little more than (D)HTML. Great an'all, but I get the feeling these platforms will play host to some of the most horrific widespread exploits we'll see in the coming years if they become as ubiquitous as their various creators hope. You only have to look at some of the great things the VXers have already been able to pull off using simple Javascript attack vectors against massive Ajax-heavy sites in recent months.

Pessimistic, moi?

It's attempting to blend the power of the networked information superhighway with a rich desktop experience to provide a foundation for the next logical step in desktop computing. ;)

Umm... Or here's their view on it:
http://people.mozilla.com/~faaborg/files/p...mparison550.png

Basically it sounds like they're trying to allow users to run things in a window much like a regular application, that is without making the browser chrome get in the way. And in the process of doing so, also give the user more freedom to access local resources, I assume with some sort of security design in there.

But that really sounds a lot like the underused feature Internet Explorer has had since eons ago...
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms536496.aspx

Jugalator said,
It's attempting to blend the power of the networked information superhighway with a rich desktop experience to provide a foundation for the next logical step in desktop computing. ;)

Umm... Or here's their view on it:
http://people.mozilla.com/~faaborg/files/p...mparison550.png

Basically it sounds like they're trying to allow users to run things in a window much like a regular application, that is without making the browser chrome get in the way. And in the process of doing so, also give the user more freedom to access local resources, I assume with some sort of security design in there.

But that really sounds a lot like the underused feature Internet Explorer has had since eons ago...
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms536496.aspx

You are partly true,
Microsoft HTml Applications are trusted chrome-less windows that can do lot of client side magic, without security prompts.

But, Microsoft HTA technology doesn't allow connecting to external domains, it is standalone application can be written using html, js activex, java etc.