Mac OS X 10.5.7 released

We've been hearing about the development of Apple's update to their Leopard operating system, 10.5, for quite a while now and just earlier it seems it has been finally released. The update, named 10.5.7, was initially expected a little while ago, but those rumors never came into fruition. There's no need to worry about that now however, Mac users, because you can pick it up from your nearest Software Update.

So, what's changed in OS X 10.5.7? To be fair, not much; you can't expect this release to bring any new features, especially with Apple's Snow Leopard operating system under development and hopefully for a release soon. Instead, this was focused on bug fixes and improvements in certain areas. We've included a full list of changes from Apple's support document:

General

* Includes latest security fixes.
* Includes additional RAW image support for several third-party cameras.
* Improves performance of video playback and cursor movements for recent Macs with NVIDIA graphics.
* Resolves an issue with Dvorak keyboard layout in Mac OS X 10.5.6.
* Improves the reliability and accuracy of Unit Converter, Stocks, Weather and Movies Dashboard widgets.
* Addresses a situation that may cause issues when logging into Gmail.
* Improves reliability when syncing contacts with Yahoo!.
* Expansion Slot Utility for Mac Pro now reports the correct PCIe slot configuration.
* Improves network performance when connected to certain Ethernet switches that have Flow Control enabled.
* Improves stability for network home directories hosted by Mac OS X Server v10.4.
* Improves Finder search results for network volumes that may not support Spotlight searching, such as Mac OS X Server v10.4, Time Capsule, and third-party AFP servers.
* Includes several improvements to Directory Service and Client Management, which are described in the About Mac OS X Server 10.5.7 Update article.

iCal

* Improves overall reliability with CalDav.
* Improves reliability when automatically syncing with MobileMe.

Mail

* Addresses reliability and sync issues with Notes.
* Addresses an issue that may cause the BCC field to populate incorrectly when redirecting a message from the Sent mailbox.

Parental Controls

* Improves consistency with Parental Controls and application restrictions.
* Addresses an issue in which time limits may not work properly with full-screen games and Fast User Switching.

Printing

* Resolves an issue that may cause certain third-party printers to print to the incorrect paper tray.
* Non-admin user accounts can now be allowed to add and remove printers by enabling Parental Controls and selecting "Can administer printers".
* Includes other printing reliability and stability improvements.

As mentioned, you can grab this update from Software Update found in the Apple menu, but otherwise, you can find the standalone installers from the links you can find at the end of this article. Go forth, Mac users; install this update pronto and be sure to let us know how it goes (and if you find any improvements) in the comments below.

Download: Mac OS X 10.5.7 regular update (442MB)
Download: Mac OS X 10.5.7 combo update (729MB)

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48 Comments

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Can I just ask what exactly this means;

"* Addresses a situation that may cause issues when logging into Gmail."

What exactly did they change, and why was it included in the general section of a system wide update?

I would have thought at most it could affect either Safari or Mail, in which case they access Gmail in completely different ways, and so an update for either would not be relevent to the other, and should therefore be listed in a different part of the change log.

Anyway, perhaps I'm being overly critical but this does remind me of that list of "features" they claimed to have added in Leopard. (I'm not questioning if they were actually implemented, rather that they could be considered features in the more traditional sense.)

Well I have installed the update on my iMac8,1 MBP and Mini and I see a significant speed increase and I am running the Safari 4 Beta build 5528.17. All of them running speedy.

Nowadays for Apple the verbs Improve, Address and Resolve = Fix, but they don't use that word because it would mean that something was broken, but hey, that it's impossible on a mac, right?

Eh, no, 10.5.7 is the version number, not the build number. Those are two separate numbers. Like Windows XP was version 5.1, build 2600 (I think).

When it comes to Mac OS, 10 is the version number (it came after 9), and they just decided to be Apple about it and use a roman numeral. The precise version number, however, will be 10.5.7. So while we might say "OS ten" for short, when being precise, we should be saying "OS ten point five..." etc.

The name of the product is still Mac OS. X is, and has been, the version number. It is not the NAME of the product any more than 7 is the name of the new version of Windows.

Joshie said,
Am I the only one who thinks it's redundant to say OS X 10.5.7?

Yeah, I've been thinking about that. I feel weird writing "OS 10.5.7" though, heh. I dunno, I'm kinda of pedantic... it LOOKS right, but I know it's wrong. Bah, I dunno

I think it went to pot when people started calling the hardware 'Mac' and the software 'OS X' and ditching the name MacOS, which would look more normal next to the longer version number: MacOS 10.5.7.

Otherwise, you're reading "OS ten ten point five..." out loud and sounding like you have a speech impediment.

This better not ruin Wifi as 10.5.6 did. Had to resort to "unofficial" drivers for my Genuine Mid-2006 iMac because I couldn't find any networks, but had full signal previously.

Going to restart now, wish me luck! :P

That's a hefty update there Glad it finally out tho, some of my Mac buddies should be jumping around now like lil school girls

OS 11.. you mean XI? haha. nah people like calling it OS 'ex'. Besides SnowLeopard is supposed to be an incremental upgrade, not a major release (even though it is)

C_Guy said,
Except that, in the real world, it's really just a service pack for OS X. Ok, whatever you say! ;)

Meh, its a little more than a service pack. These OS X "releases" have quite the UI overhaul and inclusion of new features that add enough value to justify the cost. Besides, what do they charge? $99 for these things? Thats nothing compared to MS licensing. 10.5.7 is the "service pack" release to 10.5. 10.6 is a new release of the OS.

Saying 10.6 is just the 6th 'service pack' to v10.0 doesn't do the addition of all the new features any justice. To date, the only Microsoft service pack that added new features has been SP2 to XP. The rest have been glorified patches.

Its all semantics in the end. Apple's release schedule is more frequent than MS's, and customers are happy to pay for the upgrades.

C_Guy said,
Except that, in the real world, it's really just a service pack for OS X. Ok, whatever you say! ;)

No, 10.x upgrades are all new operating systems, they always were.

Taking it from 10 to 11 would be like MS taking Windows from the NT codebase to something else, and that hasn't happened since Windows NT 3.1 in 1993 with the line that is now at Windows 7.

So OS X is actually building on a newer architecture than Windows 7, since that OS line was initiated in 2002.

This misconception is frustratingly common here on Neowin.

10.5.x is, on the other hand, the service packs you're looking for, and Apple use to release them in smaller increments, so you get more of them, and more often. We're hence now on the seventh service pack for OS X Leopard. The OS X in that name is like the NT in Windows.

Besides, what do they charge? $99 for these things? Thats nothing compared to MS licensing. 10.5.7 is the "service pack" release to 10.5. 10.6 is a new release of the OS.

Oh my...

You do realise you can buy Windows Vista Home Premium Upgrade for less than the $99 you say Apple charge for OSX?

Also your point that Apple charge people on a more frequent basis for upgrades than Microsoft does not suggest anything more than Apple charge too much for small upgrades. OSX and Windows are similar in development so, its not like OSX needs more frequent updates - rather its just a great way to make money.

Jugalator said,
...

So OS X is actually building on a newer architecture than Windows 7, since that OS line was initiated in 2002.

This misconception is frustratingly common here on Neowin.
....

Ummm, do you want to rethink that statement?

You do realize that Apple didn't write the foundation of their OS, right? Apple didn't write OS X from the ground up in 2002. In fact OS X is built upon a much much older architecture than Windows. It also seems that Apple users, on occasion, like to tout the fact that it is build on a much more *mature* foundation.

I guess us Windows users just don't get it.

Anyone else picturing C_Guy, in 2016, typing, "Finally Apple is offering a major upgrade. I've been typing, 'It's just a service pack' in hundreds of Internet posts for 16 years."