Some ISPs help out with DNSChanger issues

As many of you might already know, today is supposed to be the day that tens of thousands of people in the US could lose their access to the Internet. This is due to a malware program called DNSChanger, which redirected those infected PCs to rogue servers. The FBI actually shut down this malware operation some time ago, but kept the servers alive so those PCs with the DNSChanger program could keep their net access.

Today, the FBI is supposed to shut down those servers. Estimates are that around 64,000 PCs in the US could be infected by the malware and as such their net access could be disabled once those servers go down. However, the Wall Street Journal reports that large US ISPs have pledged to help their customers with DNSChanger maintain their Internet connection.

AT&T seems to be making the biggest effort, claiming that it will redirect PCs with the malware to the correct websites. A spokesperson for the company said:

We will operate legitimate domain-name servers through the end of the year, and that will give the very, very small number of customers whose computers may be affected time to remove it from their computer and avoid any service interruption. They will not be cut off.

Other ISPs such as Comcast have sent out emails to customers they suspect might have the DNSChanger malware to alert them ahead of time. Verizon has also offered customers instructions on how to remove the malware or offered to link them to contractors to have them take out the program. All in all, it sounds like this threat may affect a smaller number of people than originally suspected.

Source: Wall Street Journal

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12 Comments

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While I've been reading about this for a while I haven't been paying much attention. So this is a DNS issue now, correct? If that's the case... wow, just wow....

A 5 second fix, changing the DNS back, is causing all this hype? Or am I missing something? I hope I am or this planet is surely doomed from stupidity and laziness.

KCRic said,
While I've been reading about this for a while I haven't been paying much attention. So this is a DNS issue now, correct? If that's the case... wow, just wow....

A 5 second fix, changing the DNS back, is causing all this hype? Or am I missing something? I hope I am or this planet is surely doomed from stupidity and laziness.


Exactly what I was thinking. If nothing else, write a "good" virus that changes it back and call it a day

If they are so dumb and to not have cleaned up their pcs by now? Let them suffer. Why waste a single penny on helping them?

"AT&T seems to be making the biggest effort, claiming that it will redirect PCs with the malware to the correct websites."

IMO that's not at all helpful for the customers with infected computers, it seems more like a help to their customer support department...

I imagine that while the FBI operated those DNS servers out of the kindness of their hearts, they were also perusing the queries for criminal activity.

Feritas said,
I imagine that while the FBI operated those DNS servers out of the kindness of their hearts, they were also perusing the queries for criminal activity.

DNS server queries? its just a bunch of 'Who knows where i can find http://www.blabla.com?';
domain names dont say much tho. and those who are into the criminal **** they're after... usually they dont use public DNS servers to begin with

Shadowzz said,

DNS server queries? its just a bunch of 'Who knows where i can find http://www.blabla.com?';
domain names dont say much tho. and those who are into the criminal **** they're after... usually they dont use public DNS servers to begin with

Just because someone commits crime using a computer does not mean they know anything about DNS, IP, VPNs, or darknets.

Why don't the FBI redirect any requests on these DNS servers to a FBI page telling them they need to run the fix and provide a link?

PR. said,
Why don't the FBI redirect any requests on these DNS servers to a FBI page telling them they need to run the fix and provide a link?

Court order wouldn't allow it, they only could maintain the servers, not alter then or redirect them an the court order expired today

They should just be cancelling their accounts..

Infected with a virus for a year or more.. Internet [ and the ISP's networks ] are better without them..