Sony offers new info on Playstation Network shutdown

On Sunday, Sony announced that its Playstation Network console online service would start its restoration process later this week. Today the official Playstation blog site gave new info on the shut down of the service which was handled on April 20 after a cyber attack hit the network and lifted personal info of tens of millions of Playstation gamers.

In the blog update, Patrick Seybold, the Senior Director of Corporate Communications and Social Media for Sony's Playstation business, tried once again to quell players fears that in addition to the personal info, the far more important credit card info had also been lifted from the Playstation Network services. Sony has said repeatedly that there is no evidence that credit card information was obtained during the cyber attack. In today's statement, Seybold tried to stomp on a rumor that someone was trying to sell a list of all that credit card information back to Sony. Seybold wrote, "To my knowledge there is no truth to this report of a list, or that Sony was offered an opportunity to purchase the list."

Seybold also clarified that while passwords used on the Playstation Network were not technically encrypted, "they were transformed using a cryptographic hash function." He directed players to a web site where the difference between encryption and hashing is better defined. He also repeated that Sony would never ask its users for things like your credit card number, saying, "If you are asked for this information, you can be confident Sony is not the entity asking."

While there is still no word on who or which group was responsible for the cyber attack Seybold wrote, "We continue to work with law enforcement and forensic experts to identify the criminals behind the attack." In the meantime he said that all Playstation users should change their password once the Playstation Network is restored and to keep an eye out on your credit card accounts to make sure it is not being used by outsiders.

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"but we still love you Sony! I'll shell out money to you and keep myself happy. Here's my credit card numbers, take them all and here are my passwords."

He also repeated that Sony would never ask its users for things like your credit card number, saying, "If you are asked for this information, you can be confident Sony is not the entity asking."

I know I'm nitpicking here, but this line struck me as humorous...

If Sony never asked for their credit card numbers, how did they end up with them? I don't generally give mine to people that don't want them...

M_Lyons10 said,

I know I'm nitpicking here, but this line struck me as humorous...

If Sony never asked for their credit card numbers, how did they end up with them? I don't generally give mine to people that don't want them...

He's saying that if ANYONE calls you and says their from Sony, it's not. Sony will not call and ask you to confirm your cc number.

etempest said,
This is confusing, DailyTech is reporting Sony committed that up to 10 million's CC info could of been exposed. http://www.dailytech.com/Sony+...ee+Service/article21509.htm

Some of these articles have made this unnecessarily confusing. I believe that although there are 77million PSN accounts, only 10million of them actually had valid and active credit cards. I know, "only" 10million, but that's where this number has come from and they're not saying they have been compromised, just that IF there's a compromise, it's to the tune of 10million credit cards, not 77million.

necrosis said,
What is it Sony? CC's are in the wild or not?

Sony has already responded to this question.
Q: Was my credit card data taken?
A: While all credit card information stored in our systems is encrypted and there is no evidence at this time that credit card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility. If you have provided your credit card data through PlayStation Network or Qriocity, out of an abundance of caution we are advising you that your credit card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have been obtained.

(source: http://blog.us.playstation.com...work-and-qriocity-services/)

AP707 said,
Like I just said, things just keep on getting worse for Sony.

What, from this article, makes you say that?

Manish said,

What, from this article, makes you say that?

The last line where he contradicts himself. First he says there is no evidence that CC info was compromised, then says:

In the meantime he said that all Playstation users should change their password once the Playstation Network is restored and to keep an eye out on your credit card accounts to make sure it is not being used by outsiders.

RangerLG said,

The last line where he contradicts himself. First he says there is no evidence that CC info was compromised, then says:

Wouldn't say that's a contradiction. That's just sound advice. Plus he didn't say that no CC info was stolen, just that there wasn't any evidence of it happening as of now.

Sharb8 said,

really? you need an article to tell you that?

If it's that obvious, perhaps you would like to point out a part of this article that suggests that things are getting worse for Sony. (Bearing in mind that the last line isn't a contradiction, as ILikeTobacco has pointed out.)