South Korean wireless carrier promises 300 Mbps by end of 2014

In case you’re feeling mighty proud of your new 75 Mbps LTE connectivity we have some bittersweet news for you. A South Korean carrier is looking to launch LTE-A by the end of this year, with a connection capable of handling 300 Mbps.

While most of the world still has issues when it comes to broadband distribution and cell phone connectivity, certain countries in Asia are years ahead and among them is South Korea.

SK Telecom promises it will launch a version of LTE-Advanced that uses 3 distinct bands combining two 10 MHz bands and one 20 MHz band and achieving speeds of up to 300 Mbps. That pretty much puts to shame everyone else including many broadband providers.

Before folks can start using the service, the company will work with OEMs and chip manufacturers to implement a global standard of the technology, a step that’s supposed to be finished by the end of the year.

And before you get too excited about that download speed, note that the carrier will be showcasing speeds of up to 450 Mbps at Mobile World Congress in February.

Now the only question remaining is how long we’ll have to wait until we see such tech in our part of the woods.

Source: SK Telecom via: Engadget | Image via Telecomlead

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Tinder's CEO wants to chat with Rudy Huyn, creator of pulled Windows Phone app 6tindr

Next Story

Microsoft Store website finally has Surface 2 tablets back in stock

11 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Wow puts shame to Australian internet max I can get in my town is 8mbps cable internet or 3G if your lucky on a mobile.

For those asking what's the point, this is a similar situation to broadband in the early 2000s, or even 3G later on. Applications always follow capabilities. Plus such advances will make current caps obsolete. It's not feasable to have 2GB cap when, as Mordkanin pointed out, that would run out in less than a minute. So carriers, devs and users will all adapt to the new tech in time.

Vlad Dudau said,
For those asking what's the point, this is a similar situation to broadband in the early 2000s, or even 3G later on. Applications always follow capabilities. Plus such advances will make current caps obsolete. It's not feasable to have 2GB cap when, as Mordkanin pointed out, that would run out in less than a minute. So carriers, devs and users will all adapt to the new tech in time.

Indeed...but there are timescales. 300Mbps won't really be required on a desktop machine for the foreseeable future let alone on a phone.

anyone "need" this speed? (notice the "need" part). With caps, hardware limitations, I can't see this being beneficial. Sure move forward with tech, but to push one single area THIS far forward seems like the investment money could have been better spent in another area. I feel its like the "MORE COREZ" approach that phone makers are pushing in phones. But, I am not in this field, so am I more then likely wrong.

rippleman said,
anyone "need" this speed? (notice the "need" part). With caps, hardware limitations, I can't see this being beneficial. Sure move forward with tech, but to push one single area THIS far forward seems like the investment money could have been better spent in another area. I feel its like the "MORE COREZ" approach that phone makers are pushing in phones. But, I am not in this field, so am I more then likely wrong.

Where I live data caps are only on the bottom tier broadband subscriptions usually, with always an unlimited data option. Faster internet is beneficial especially if you have multiple users, you won't cause your roommate to rage while he's online gaming because you're watching Netflix etc, these kind of speeds will open up to being able to stream 4K video. Download speeds for large files will be much better, especially as games for PS4 and XB1 are all on the digital store now too.

rippleman said,
anyone "need" this speed? (notice the "need" part). With caps, hardware limitations, I can't see this being beneficial. Sure move forward with tech, but to push one single area THIS far forward seems like the investment money could have been better spent in another area. I feel its like the "MORE COREZ" approach that phone makers are pushing in phones. But, I am not in this field, so am I more then likely wrong.

I don't get any caps with my 80mb fibre :-) (in UK) and trust me, I've downloaded terabytes (last i checked, think i'd had about 8tb lol)

Broadband connections don't have bandwidth limits either, even fair usage policies are a thing of the 90s only. But our mobile carries however all have data limits, even the unlimited ones all have fair usage policies.

But hurray, each broadband provider is rolling out hotspots at home Just have to collect a few more and I can hop from wifi to wifi almost anywhere i go, or am, even when on the move.