Sprint improves PC mobile broadband plans

Sprint is making some changes to its PC mobile data plans that should make its current customers happy as we head into the busy (and sometimes expensive) holiday season. Beginning today, Sprint says that it will offer up to 6 GB of data for $49.99 a month via PC USB sticks and laptop cards along with mobile broadband enabled netbooks and notebooks. It will also now offer up to 12 GB a month for $79.99 a month for those devices.

These changes give Sprint an edge over AT&T which currently tops out at 5 GB for $50 a month for its own PC mobile broadband plans. Sprint's new prices are also better than Verizon's normal plans for the same service which are 5 GB for $50 a month or 10 GB for $80 a month. However,  just a few days ago Verizon launched a special holiday promotion which doubles the broadband cap for all of its price points for a limited time. While Sprint's changes are permanent, Verizon has not yet said when its special promotion will end.

In addition to the above changes, Sprint announced that owners of its 3G/4G tablets and its dedicated mobile hotspot devices can also choose to purchase new data plans. These plans give those owners 1 GB of data per month for $19.99 or 3 GB a month for $34.99.

These new prices and plans don't affect the data plans for Sprint's smartphones which still have an option to have unlimited data for one monthly fee.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Siri cracked, theoretically available on other platforms

Next Story

The TouchPad Lives!

15 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Ridlas said,
@De.Bug People like you are the reason for those caps.

This is 2011, the data caps are nothing more than modern day extortion. When these telecom companies force you to be locked to these 2-year contracts, and they cap the data you're allowed to consume, mind you, you pay for it whether you use them or not, and lord forbid you go over, that just isn't right. Especially from the consumer end. As a consumer, I do not want to have to think about the data I consume. If in fact there is "network congestion" issues, as these telecom companies would have you believe, that should be an incentive for investors of said company to improve their network! Again, it's 2011! The fact that these companies are capping data, and making it more expensive, as data usage is going up exponentially, just goes to prove my initial argument that these companies are practicing extortion. I do not feel one bit sorry for consuming my data, that I paid for. If it were up to me, data caps would be illegal. Naysayers, be damned

anaughtymouse said,

This is 2011, the data caps are nothing more than modern day extortion. When these telecom companies force you to be locked to these 2-year contracts, and they cap the data you're allowed to consume, mind you, you pay for it whether you use them or not, and lord forbid you go over, that just isn't right. Especially from the consumer end. As a consumer, I do not want to have to think about the data I consume. If in fact there is "network congestion" issues, as these telecom companies would have you believe, that should be an incentive for investors of said company to improve their network! Again, it's 2011! The fact that these companies are capping data, and making it more expensive, as data usage is going up exponentially, just goes to prove my initial argument that these companies are practicing extortion. I do not feel one bit sorry for consuming my data, that I paid for. If it were up to me, data caps would be illegal. Naysayers, be damned

You sound like someone who's never done any actual research on how wireless networks work.

While the cap model isn't ideal, the belief that endless supplies of bandwidth over the airwaves are just a matter of investments (with money you don't seem interested in contributing to) isn't even laughable--it's that special kind of ignorant I feel like I should avert my eyes from.

Joshie said,

You sound like someone who's never done any actual research on how wireless networks work.

While the cap model isn't ideal, the belief that endless supplies of bandwidth over the airwaves are just a matter of investments (with money you don't seem interested in contributing to) isn't even laughable--it's that special kind of ignorant I feel like I should avert my eyes from.

As a consumer, why should I? At the end of the day I want my technology to work. Will I abuse it, yes! That's the point. I think a great example of a country that's got their infrastructure together would be (I believe) the South Koreans. Mind you, I'm not entirely sure about how their wireless spectrum is treated, but I'm pretty sure they don't have caps. There was a demand for larges amounts of data, and the markets responded. I WANT UNLIMITED DATA, AND I WANT IT CHEAP! These are the demands as a consumer we SHOULD be making. If you succumb to the ways of these telecom companies, and play their game, you're only enabling them to continue these bad practices. Data liberation for all

Joshie said,

You sound like someone who's never done any actual research on how wireless networks work.

While the cap model isn't ideal, the belief that endless supplies of bandwidth over the airwaves are just a matter of investments (with money you don't seem interested in contributing to) isn't even laughable--it's that special kind of ignorant I feel like I should avert my eyes from.

Apparently you don't realize how much bandwidth REALLY costs for these companies.

You want it all to the detriment of all the other customers. The data plan already is "unlimited" in a sense - you get a certain amount of pre-paid data, and then there is no limit to how much you can pay in excess data. You want more? you pay. You want more cheap pre-paid data? Buy two (or three or four, etc.)

Simon- said,
You want it all to the detriment of all the other customers. The data plan already is "unlimited" in a sense - you get a certain amount of pre-paid data, and then there is no limit to how much you can pay in excess data. You want more? you pay. You want more cheap pre-paid data? Buy two (or three or four, etc.)

People of the future will gawk in awe at how primitively we treat our data. Personally I consider it just as natural and necessary a resource as say WATER. It should be as cheap, and free if possible. I am not a big fan of capped data, mind you paying for it.

Simon- said,
You want it all to the detriment of all the other customers. The data plan already is "unlimited" in a sense - you get a certain amount of pre-paid data, and then there is no limit to how much you can pay in excess data. You want more? you pay. You want more cheap pre-paid data? Buy two (or three or four, etc.)

Who in their right mind would ever want that? I agree with anaughtymouse - the things some of these companies are able to get away with is absolutely incredible to me.

anaughtymouse said,

As a consumer, why should I? At the end of the day I want my technology to work. Will I abuse it, yes! That's the point. I think a great example of a country that's got their infrastructure together would be (I believe) the South Koreans. Mind you, I'm not entirely sure about how their wireless spectrum is treated, but I'm pretty sure they don't have caps. There was a demand for larges amounts of data, and the markets responded. I WANT UNLIMITED DATA, AND I WANT IT CHEAP! These are the demands as a consumer we SHOULD be making. If you succumb to the ways of these telecom companies, and play their game, you're only enabling them to continue these bad practices. Data liberation for all


Umm, South Korea has a good network, but service was so expensive over there, the government actually stepped in a year or two back and mandated price reductions (and it's still expensive). They also most certainly do have data caps, and even their 4G networks often enough don't have any unlimited options whatsoever.

Sorry if this somehow leaves you feeling cold and disillusioned, but just because a country seems to be in a happier, more colorful technology situation than your own doesn't mean it adheres to your principles.

Just for fun though, you really ought to pursue starting a business some day. You sound like your understanding of the business-consumer relationship could use some...evolving. It's a transaction, mutually beneficial. The cards are never all in one side's hand.

I'm on the prepaid service powered by Sprint, known as Virgin Mobile. I was "grandfathered" in before the price change, so I pay $25 a month for unlimited data, text, and 300 minutes. I do power up my bittorrent overnight, and also use my device as a hotspot. I feel really sorry for the fools that drop $80 for 10 gigs!!! I run through that in two days, tops fwa ha ha, you never saw nothing

I hope we get decent plans soon instead of this 10GB of data a month bull****. I want to use bittorrent on my phone.

De.Bug said,
I hope we get decent plans soon instead of this 10GB of data a month bull****. I want to use bittorrent on my phone.


FAIL

De.Bug said,
I hope we get decent plans soon instead of this 10GB of data a month bull****. I want to use bittorrent on my phone.

And congest the already over congested mobile networks even further. Wireless spectrum can only handle so much bandwidth, it is better for everyone to waste bandwidth on fixed line broadband instead as it can handle more bandwidth.

Simon- said,

And congest the already over congested mobile networks even further. Wireless spectrum can only handle so much bandwidth, it is better for everyone to waste bandwidth on fixed line broadband instead as it can handle more bandwidth.

It doesn't help that many of the carriers in the US sell their mobile broadband as a replacement for fixed line broadband. Where I live mobile broadband is seen as a complimentary/supplementary service of 'broadband on the go' rather than a replacement for fixed line broadband.