Sprint offers customers unlimited cloud storage for $4.99 a month

Sprint, the third biggest wireless carrier in the U.S, is trying to make it easier for its iPhone and Android customers to store their photos, videos and documents. Today, the company announced a partnership with Pogoplug that will allow most of Sprint's customers access to unlimited cloud storage space for an additional $4.99 a month. The charge will be added to a Sprint customer's monthly bill if they choose that option.

Today's press release also announces that Sprint will have a free cloud storage option as well, up to 5GB, for its customers who don't want to add that extra charge. Sprint says they are the only wireless carrier in the U.S. that is offering an unlimited online storage option for its users. However, the Pogoplug service does not currently support Microsoft's Windows Phone. Sprint currently sells two Windows Phone smartphones, which means that owners of those handsets are out of luck.

Pogoplugk's Terms of Service state that users of their cloud service cannot upload or download any content that is considered "unlawful, harassing, threatening, harmful, tortious, defamatory, libelous, abusive, violent, obscene, vulgar, invasive of another's privacy, hateful, racially or ethnically offensive, or otherwise objectionable." The terms don't specifically prohibit any content that depicts nudity, as Microsoft does with its now renamed OneDrive service.

Sprint is still the only one of the four major U.S. carriers to offer true unlimited high speed data; AT&T and Verizon have data caps and T-Mobile reduces the download speed on its own "unlimited" data plan after the customer reaches a certain amount.

Source: Sprint | Sprint image via Shutterstock

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5 Comments

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I looked at Pogoplug's website quickly because of this article. I didn't see anything about file encryption on the server end. Sure, I can encyrpt the files before I upload them, but that is a pain. Pogoplug offers their Tor hardware that can be mounted onto the user's home router, but this does nothing to secure the information while it is on Pogoplug's own servers.

Places like Copy have a strong record of security and prominently display when registering that they use 256 AES encryption on their servers among other techniques. Both offer free storage to try. Copy offers 15 gigs free to start. Check out Copy while you are shopping around. https://copy.com?r=FeT00u

I don't see any "deal" here. SkyDrive/OneDrive works great with 7GB of free storage; contrary to popular belief, Microsoft isn't hunting down nudity (though I could be mistaken). Otherwise, my account would have been closed a long time ago.

At $5/mo, that doesn't really differ from the way Pogoplug does business already, does it? Hell, if I needed that much space, I'd rather do the $50/yr through them than $5/mo ($60/yr).

I don't really see what Sprint did here, other than to attach it to their monthly bill.

Yeah why go with an option not tied to a carrier, hell I want all my cloud storage tied to my mobile contract so that I have to stay with that carrier! Can they supply sprint based email accounts as well, you know so that when I want to switch its as hard as it possibly can be for me, please?

Not sure if this is really the service seller Sprint thinks/needs it to be. Every major mobile OS already has some sort of free cloud option, whether it's Box, OneDrive, Google Drive or even iCloud. And considering Sprint's rather sparse 4G/LTE coverage, I doubt most users will get excited at unlimited 3G uploads. This seems like a deal best suited for businesses that rely on cloud storage and aren't already firmly in bed with other services. Granted, I have nothing wrong with the deal if that is the market Sprint is aiming for, I just don't see this taking off from a general consumer perspective.