Stanford getting Google broadband; Google Fiber communities still coming

Google has announced plans to build an ultra-high speed broadband network at Stanford University’s Residential subdivision. The faculty holds just over 850 staff on the grounds around it and they will have access to some blazingly fast speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second, something many of us can just dream of.

Despite a lot of Internet chatter today, Google has made it very clear that this trial will differ from the community selection process that they announced in February this year that will make use of Google Fiber. That announcement has Google hoping to reach between 50,000 and 500,000 people in a selected build location, much larger than the Stanford Facility grounds hold. Over 600 communities have applied to be one of the first to test the Fiber network.

Google stated that the decision to build at Stanford was due to the openness of the university as they are allowing them to test out new fiber technologies across their streets. They also said that the area is best suited to beta testing, as there are a small number of homes very close to Google headquarters

This is great news for speed enthusiasts hoping to get much faster upload and download speeds in the future, knowing that companies like Google are pushing the envelope compared to many other broadband companies.

Work on the ultra-high speed network will begin early next year.

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17 Comments

I'm sure that 1Gb/ps will come in really useful for ... streaming Youtube videos and loading web pages and downloading legal songs from iTunes that are 3.5MB in size.

I have a 100Mb connection and even I can't find legal ways to saturate this thing, let alone 10x that.

Vice said,
I'm sure that 1Gb/ps will come in really useful for ... streaming Youtube videos and loading web pages and downloading legal songs from iTunes that are 3.5MB in size.

I have a 100Mb connection and even I can't find legal ways to saturate this thing, let alone 10x that.

+1

What these days is there to legally use that speed, Nothing is the answer, Torrents is certainly something that users who don't care about remaining legal on the internet will do, But for all the good people, I don't think so.

Vice said,
I'm sure that 1Gb/ps will come in really useful for ... streaming Youtube videos and loading web pages and downloading legal songs from iTunes that are 3.5MB in size.

I have a 100Mb connection and even I can't find legal ways to saturate this thing, let alone 10x that.

true.. but at a university campus there could be very different applications. For example they could have workstations farther away from their servers.. It would be cool in the future if you could just rent a workstation from you ISP and not need a seperate computer.

Vice said,
I have a 100Mb connection and even I can't find legal ways to saturate this thing, let alone 10x that.
I generally agree with you in terms of personal use.

However, the reason to expand the bandwidth isn't so we can watch more YouTube videos, or download large songs. It's so that people can find more interesting uses.

As Lachlan noted, a university could also do a lot with a Gb/s connection. There is a lot of extremely data intensive research that goes on in a lot of the larger universities (and some of the smaller ones), and more bandwidth means more information, or faster results--or both.

Lachlan said,
It would be cool in the future if you could just rent a workstation from you ISP and not need a seperate computer.
Wow, I hope not. They already try to redirect invalid URLs to sponsored search pages, and they want to throttle your connection. Imagine them having control of your computer.

Well theres two things your forgetting.

1. Universities today, especially ones like Standford who have become much more digitally dependent, have much more demand for such infrastructures. When you have roughly 15k people all on the same network all having to check their email, upload files, and do extensive research that 1Gb connection really takes on quite a workload. We have a 50Mb/s connection at my university and I find times where just browsing the net gets sluggish and download rates never actually exceed 9Mb/s and typically settle right around 4-6Mb/s.

2. The second reason we need this is that cloud based computing is becoming a more and more popular idea and this makes that idea really viable. It's already being used in small scale applications in saving user preferences, it's only a matter of time that you'll be running these programs remotely through a network.

I'm pretty sure universities already have much much faster internet connections lol.

For example, my uni has 2 OC48 lines going to it. I'm pretty sure Stanford has something similar lol.

Vice said,
I'm sure that 1Gb/ps will come in really useful for ... streaming Youtube videos and loading web pages and downloading legal songs from iTunes that are 3.5MB in size.

I've found that people who say that are the ones who are illegally downloading. They don't know about legal uses for the internet, because they've never legally downloaded/streamed anything.

Games - Steam
Movies - Netflix/Lovefilm
TV - Hulu/iPlayer
Music - iTunes

Hell, we've got 4 people in this house, there are often times when the connection will be saturated, with everyone is streaming and downloading stuff at the same time. That's 4 people on a 10mb connection... how many people are there in a University...?

The question is will it always be 1Gb/s? Or will it only be that fast during the wee hours of the morning? I'd love to see faster internet, but there is a real possibility that something this fast could slow down the internet for the rest of us...

shiny_red_cobra said,
The question is will it always be 1Gb/s? Or will it only be that fast during the wee hours of the morning? I'd love to see faster internet, but there is a real possibility that something this fast could slow down the internet for the rest of us...

you know nothing about fibre it seems.
fibre is almost impenetrable. you can have a cornucopia of connections and nothing will fade. Its not like DSL or cable which have a maximum bandwidth. fibre is light, which is nearly impossible to use all the available spectrum's of data at the same time. Also, speed is well at the speed of light. very fast. not like electric signals which are bouncing off the sides of a coax line..
think of fibre as a guy driving a porche to the hospital on speed to save his daughter. think of coax as a bunch of drunks trying to walk down a really wide hall, that has to touch every brick on either side..

Ruciz said,

you know nothing about fibre it seems.
fibre is almost impenetrable. you can have a cornucopia of connections and nothing will fade. Its not like DSL or cable which have a maximum bandwidth. fibre is light, which is nearly impossible to use all the available spectrum's of data at the same time. Also, speed is well at the speed of light. very fast. not like electric signals which are bouncing off the sides of a coax line..
think of fibre as a guy driving a porche to the hospital on speed to save his daughter. think of coax as a bunch of drunks trying to walk down a really wide hall, that has to touch every brick on either side..

Haha. I couldn't help but laugh.
There is a range of wavelengths that you can transmit light in. The bandwidth is greater than coax, but not infinite. The speed of light has nothing to do with the bandwidth. Electrical impulses also travel at the speed of light. The bandwidth in fiber is limited by how fast the laser can turn on and off and how fast the photodiode can detect changes.

surrealvortex said,

Haha. I couldn't help but laugh.
There is a range of wavelengths that you can transmit light in. The bandwidth is greater than coax, but not infinite. The speed of light has nothing to do with the bandwidth. Electrical impulses also travel at the speed of light. The bandwidth in fiber is limited by how fast the laser can turn on and off and how fast the photodiode can detect changes.

The speed of the electricity in a cooper cable without insulation is 96% of the speed of light and can drop down to 66% the speed of light on a coaxial cable.
http://www.webanswers.com/scie...icity-or-light-speed-42b38f

I actually went and searched this since nothing can be as fast as the speed of light in vaccum, so i was critical about the "electrical impulses travel at the speed of light".

It would be nice if "techies" would think about what Google is trying to do here. They are facilitating innovation. Think about it. Cloud computing is destined to be defined as working completely in the cloud reminiscent of dumb terminals connecting to Citrix or Terminal Services; all of what you're working on is in the cloud.

Documents are fine now, those are small. What Google knows is only an eventuality is that we will be using music and even video over the cloud. Bigger and better and more powerful applications will be hosted as software as a service used as easily as Google Docs or Office Apps or the other free audio editing cloud applications.

I see a future with full blown applications and editing being done directly on the cloud. Think about the bandwidth requirements for that. And the collaboration possibilities.

It isn't about saturation of speeds, well it is kinda, but its mostly about DRM enforcement and positive control.... If the network is fast enough no one can ever crack it as it would be constantly evolving so software code would never be seen and it would protect developers.

If you could load your system instantly and remotely from any 'blank' terminal anywhere in the world, you would never need true hardware and access to programs code wouldn't be a (simple) reality as it would be live AND remote.
It would never be modifiable, hackable, crackable, changable, or anything else without the server finding out and 'restoring' what was changed to normal. It would be the same software that you paid for on your cell, your monitor, public station, television... get the idea? It would literally stream over the fibre/cell towers to anywhere in the world on any device in the world in real-time with full speed access. The server would do all the work (including logging) and you would pay a nominal fee for access. no computer, no power usage, no control.. the digital cloud dream!

Yes, the future is friendly - for some.

The hardware (ethernet port on say, some desktop motherboards) can actually utilize these speeds? 0_o

este said,
The hardware (ethernet port on say, some desktop motherboards) can actually utilize these speeds? 0_o

If you have a gigabit ethernet port sure lol.

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