Steam Early Access allows gamers to purchase games in development

Today Valve is giving Steam users the opportunity to play games that are still in active development. As well as getting early access, the games will evolve when you play, you can discuss and send feedback to the developers, and help test and report bugs.

Steam currently has 12 titles avaliable for Early Access including Kenshi, StarForge Alpha, Drunken Robot Pornography, Gnomoria, and Gear Up which is the only free game, though it does have a premium version. You can check out all of the Early Access titles right here or on your Steam app.

Developers can offer discounts when a game is still in the early stages and bring the price up as development ends. If you're a developer and your game has already been Greenlit, Steam suggests you contact your Valve release team and let them know your plans and interest.

Source: Steam

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11 Comments

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I've been watching it for a while on their site, don't get me wrong I love introversion software but $30 seems a bit expensive to me... And that's ALPHA, when it's released it's gonna cost more

I like it. It's similar to game kickstarters, but it seems like it would be safer because Valve is involved. No more bait-and-switch kickstarter scams.

spacer said,
I like it. It's similar to game kickstarters, but it seems like it would be safer because Valve is involved. No more bait-and-switch kickstarter scams.

How so? Theoretically, a game could still stop development after you've purchased it.

Theorectically yes, though I imagine Steam makes these companies sign some kind of legal contract before allowing their pre-release product on Steam.

TCLN Ryster said,
Theorectically yes, though I imagine Steam makes these companies sign some kind of legal contract before allowing their pre-release product on Steam.

There isn't a legal contract that Steam could enforce if the company went under. That is the whole point of limited liability in business

Well obviously lol. I was thinking more of those studios who decide, for whatever reason, to terminate the development of a game. Presumably there would be a mechanism in place to refund those who'd paid for it through this program?

TCLN Ryster said,
Well obviously lol. I was thinking more of those studios who decide, for whatever reason, to terminate the development of a game. Presumably there would be a mechanism in place to refund those who'd paid for it through this program?

Highly doubt that. You have the same risks as any other way you jump in on stuff like this. The only benefit for the game maker is the larger steam market.

The only way you have protection is if you can point to that protection being outlined in the steam terms of service.