Steam launches software download store with seven products

In August, Valve announced it would begin offering non-game based PC software products for sale on its Steam service. The software store was supposed to launch in early September, but that date came and went with no such launch. Today, the software storefront for Steam finally went live.

The software store launch is extremely modest at this point. There are just seven products available to download and that includes Valve's own free Source Filmmaker software that lets users make in-game movies based on Source Engine games such as Team Fortress 2.

The other software products include two PC benchmarking programs from Futuremark; 3DMark 11 and 3DMark Vantage. The other products are GameMaker: Studio, CameraBag 2, ArtRage Studio Pro, and 3D-Coat. All of the non-gaming software titles on Steam will be priced at 10 percent off for this launch week.

Valve adds:

Many of the launch titles will take advantage of popular Steamworks features, such as easy installation, automatic updating, and the ability to save your work to your personal Steam Cloud space so your files may travel with you. GameMaker Studio, for example, features integration with Steam Workshop that allows GameMaker users to share their work via Steam.

Many people believe Valve is entering the non-gaming software distribution business as an answer to Microsoft's Windows 8 and its own downloadable Windows Store feature. Valve co-founder Gabe Newell has been highly critical of Windows 8, saying that in his opinion that its launch will be "a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space."

Source: Steam website | Image via Valve

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Samsung amends Apple patent lawsuit to include iPhone 5

Next Story

TechSpot: Acer Aspire S5, SSD RAID-Equipped Ultrabook Review

23 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

actually, steam is a great product.on the one hand, it protects the companies products but makes it easier for users to update and play them.

ChrisJ1968 said,
it protects the companies products but makes it easier for users to update and play them.

Yea no... It really doesn't do a good job of protecting anything, just like all other kinds of DRM it's cracked in a matter of days if not even hours but is still a pain for customers.

As a matter of fact, I just had a look for Borderlands 2 (which is a Steam game on PC no matter how you buy it) and I found an upload from the 19th of September at 4am and that time is in GMT so still the 18th in the US, i.e release day. In other words, the "protection" didn't even hold up for a full day, meanwhile someone who paid like I did have to have Steam running, I can't play while it's downloading a patch (which you could do for any non steam game or with the pirate copy) or choose to ignore a patch something which can be even more annoying for boxed Steam games like SupCom 2 which after being installed a few weeks ago had to get a couple of GBs of patch data...

NPGMBR said,
How ironic that hes essentially doing the same thing that he moans about Microsoft doing with Win8.
Valve, not Gabe. In any case, there's a difference between a built-in store, and an external store.

Not the most exciting apps to start off with. Let me know when I can get Photoshop for 75% off on one of Steam's holiday sales.

Shyatic said,
And now we know why they truly hate Windows 8. It will eat their lunch.

Not really. The Windows Store won't be interesting for anything but Modern apps. For regular software it just links to the dev's site (and still only after a certifying process).

I don't get all the hate on Steam. I think it's a convenient platform. I like having my savegames synced without issues, and being able to reinstall games on a new computer/clean install with just one click is brilliant.

Ambroos said,

Not really. The Windows Store won't be interesting for anything but Modern apps. For regular software it just links to the dev's site (and still only after a certifying process).

I don't get all the hate on Steam. I think it's a convenient platform. I like having my savegames synced without issues, and being able to reinstall games on a new computer/clean install with just one click is brilliant.

It will be very hard for Steam to break into mainstream success with their software store when Windows 8 has its own store. Also though where is the incentive going to be for devs to choose Steam over Windows Store?

Ambroos said,

I like having my savegames synced without issues, and being able to reinstall games on a new computer/clean install with just one click is brilliant.

You have been able to do this with basic Windows since win 98 sp2 without a need for a 3rd party software as long as you had a modicum of skill and a file server.

Still though I'd like steam if it weren't for their guerrilla tactics. Tired of impulse buying old $5 games at like target and finding out I just bought a Steam game. Been using Steam since they launched the service and it still sucks just as much now as it did then.

NastySasquatch said,

You have been able to do this with basic Windows since win 98 sp2 without a need for a 3rd party software as long as you had a modicum of skill and a file server.

Still though I'd like steam if it weren't for their guerrilla tactics. Tired of impulse buying old $5 games at like target and finding out I just bought a Steam game. Been using Steam since they launched the service and it still sucks just as much now as it did then.


Well yeah sure you can. But none of the solutions is as seamless, effortless and free as Steam. Not needing skill or a file server is exactly what's so nice.

Ambroos said,

I don't get all the hate on Steam. I think it's a convenient platform. I like having my savegames synced without issues, and being able to reinstall games on a new computer/clean install with just one click is brilliant.

I personally hate the Steam application, and for it to load and blah. Plus when I turn my computer on and there is no internet, I can't really play games unless I set it to offline mode all the time.
But other than the application, Steam has fantastic deals on some games.

Ambroos said,

Well yeah sure you can. But none of the solutions is as seamless, effortless and free as Steam. Not needing skill or a file server is exactly what's so nice.

you do know Windows 8/RT offers the same as steam? applications/games can access your skydrive account and use that for savegames and everything else.
Instead of having to install Steam and login to that and have it all app based.
I can just login to Windows and be done with it. Have my apps synced, have the exact same experience and exact same files to access on any Win8/WinRT system on earth with an internet connection

g0ld1e said,

I personally hate the Steam application, and for it to load and blah. Plus when I turn my computer on and there is no internet, I can't really play games unless I set it to offline mode all the time.
But other than the application, Steam has fantastic deals on some games.


This. Another example would be a few weeks ago when I thought I would install Supreme Commander 2 which I have the retail box version of, that's how I buy most of my games, of course, the retail version of SupCom 2 is just a steam backup and when that slow install was done I was forced to wait while it downloaded 3GB of patches. Had it not been a steam title I could at least have played while I was downloading said patch...

Their prices are really quite horrible too unless there is a sale, at launch it's not too bad, just two or three euros too much but when the price goes down at every other retailer (except Game) the steam price stays the same.

I'll give them some credit for their sales though, they are awesome. The recent Total War pack for just 33€ for example, absolute steal! Almost feels wrong getting it so cheap

I just wouldn't want to trust my Software to Valve, do I have to have Steam open to launch my software?

I have a bad enough time trying to get Steam to open in Offline mode if I'm not online. 9/10 times I get the "This Feature is not available when not connected to the Internet".

I already started shopping elsewhere. I obviously can't say Valve is ignoring their core market, but they sure don't seem interested in it.

Deranged said,
I already started shopping elsewhere. I obviously can't say Valve is ignoring their core market, but they sure don't seem interested in it.

You mean EA's origin with tighter DRM, higher prices, or less selection?
I usually go gog.com (drm free) if it's an option 1st.

Jason Stillion said,

You mean EA's origin with tighter DRM, higher prices, or less selection?
I usually go gog.com (drm free) if it's an option 1st.


Yeah, for EA games I buy from Origin. For non EA games I mostly buy from Impulse or Amazon, who are often running decent sales when Steam isn't.

Deranged said,
they sure don't seem interested in it.
What on earth makes you say this? I mean they literally just launched Greenlight and Big Picture mode, both huge additions for gaming.

Deranged said,
I already started shopping elsewhere. I obviously can't say Valve is ignoring their core market, but they sure don't seem interested in it.

"Ignoring their core market"

Yeah, Gamers. Though, to be honest, the majority of these programs are still somewhat game-related. Benchmarks (important for games), GameMaker (obvious), and art programs (well, we gotta do something when we're not gaming)

Kirkburn said,
What on earth makes you say this? I mean they literally just launched Greenlight and Big Picture mode, both huge additions for gaming.

Yeah so making gamers do your job for you and enabling the few people who play PC games on TVs? I'm so very excited.

Kirkburn said,
What on earth makes you say this? I mean they literally just launched Greenlight and Big Picture mode, both huge additions for gaming.

I suppose Greenlight is OK, can see how some would like that. Big picture mode? Are you serious? That was just a big waste of time they could have spent on making the steam client less of a slow memory hog. Sure wouldn't hurt if they did something about their high € prices too...

I was responding to a concern that they're ignoring their core market. I am not commenting on whether people like or dislike those features.

It's pretty obvious they're not ignoring gamers, and it's crazy comment to make. 99% of what they do is about gaming.