StoreDot unveils 'flash-battery' capable of charging devices in just 30 seconds

For years, battery life has been the bane of a smartphone user's existence. Lithium-ion batteries are notoriously inefficient, and frequent device use often leads to a decay of battery life over time. Nanotechnology company StoreDot is looking to change that: Today, they unveiled a new 'flash-battery' capable of charging a device to full capacity in just 30 seconds. 

The battery was showcased at Microsoft's Think Next symposium, a future tech conference held in Tel Aviv, Israel. StoreDot demonstrated their battery by placing it on a nearly-dead Samsung Galaxy S3 and letting it work its magic. As claimed, the battery went from 27% to 100% in just 26 seconds -- an increase of nearly 41,500% compared to a regular Galaxy S3 battery, which may take up to three hours to fully charge.

StoreDot's major selling point, however, is environmental friendliness. The battery is derived entirely from bio-organic materials including nanocrystals made from peptides and chains of amino acids. These have the potential to be much safer than today's batteries, which are primarily composed of heavy metals like cadmium or lithium. According to StoreDot, these organically-derived compounds will allow the company to easily synthesize new nanomaterials that can be used in a wide variety of applications.

The technology may be limited at current, but there's a huge potential for future development and commercialization. According to StoreDot, manufacturing the nanocrystals which will go into their battery is inexpensive and fast. With a heavy focus on consumer technology, we could see similar products hit store shelves in the not-so-distant future.

You can view the fast-charging battery in action below:

Source: Press release | Image via StoreDot

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richardsim7 said,
Is it just me, or was that battery the size of a brick?

most likely the storedot's rechargeable docking.

richardsim7 said,
Is it just me, or was that battery the size of a brick?

"The technology may be limited at current, but there's a huge potential for future development and commercialization. According to StoreDot, manufacturing the nanocrystals which will go into their battery is inexpensive and fast. With a heavy focus on consumer technology, we could see similar products hit store shelves in the not-so-distant future." maybe read the article.

cleverclogs said,
Annnnd how long does it take to discharge...

if the cells are dead then it would be as quick as the recharge :)

Good question. Some quick math would suggest that this demo used a VERY low capacity battery. Assuming it has 1200 mAh (same as my HD7), charging it from 27% to full over 26 seconds would require 141 A of current. Even at an operating voltage of 3.3 V, that would be 400W. Some more specific numbers on this battery would be nice.

Android will be quicker to drain the battery :)

Anyway, that's impressive. Looks like a bulky device, so perhaps they can put it into laptops first?

Afaik it's not good to fast any battery up at too fast a charging rate, this is a ridiculously high charging rate to be able to charge that, I believe it would permanently damage the battery.

Maybe, but ultimately not impossible. This is what is known as a supercapacitor. Like normal capacitors, they can store up a charge very quickly, but can only discharge it all at once. A super capacitor can charge just as quick as a traditional one, but can let go of their charge as needed.

The reason lithium batteries take so long to charge is because as the power runs through it, its very inefficient at trapping the electrons. But, if you have the right materials next to each other, and have it in such a way that all the power does not want to be released all at once, you have your self a quick charge battery

There is no evidence to suggest it's a supercapacitor, you would need a very high capacity SC to provide enough power to do that, a 1F cap doesn't have nearly enough charge, and it's the size of 1.5 AA batteries.
And charging a battery too quick (as is being done here) is still not good for batteries at all, http://www.ibt-power.com/Batte...Li_Polymer/Li_Po_ChrGph.JPG is what your average charge cycle should look like.

That's what I was thinking as well. Unless they change the batteries used in devices fast charging them to 100% like that in less than half a minute is sure to damage them.

This is perfectly great for upcoming devices that use 6-8 cores that will drain battery faster than ever if it actually optimize to use all the power.

Just think of the possibilities for electric cars. Instead of waiting many hours to charge after each short journey, drivers will be able to pop into a service station and recharge in much the same time as it takes to fill a fuel tank.

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