Stunning Analogue Nt NES now available for pre-order

If you’re in love with retro gaming we have some great news for you. The Analogue Nt, a stunning NES and Famicom remake, is now available for pre-order, shipping later this summer.

The Analogue Nt is a brand new console that takes you back to the old days, and it does it in style. It’s designed for retro enthusiasts, cartridge collectors and everyone passionate about old school gaming.

The aluminium exterior takes its design cues from the original NES but comes with a very modern twist. It’s carved out of a single block of aluminium but it offers the exact original ports and expansions as the NES and Famicom.

Analogue Nt NES

On the inside the Analogue Nt features the exact same CPU as the original NES offering 100% compatibility with all of your old cartridges and even all of the peripherals. Supposedly there’s no chance of games crashing because there’s no emulation going on.

The company also sells refurbished or new controllers (the console box just comes with an AC adapter) as well as an HDMI adapter that upscales your 8-bit games to full HD, and even generates scan lines so your old Duck Hunt Zapper gun now works with your brand new TV.

And while all of this sounds perfect it does come at a premium. The Analogue Nt is available for $499, with controllers coming in at $30 or $50. This certainly isn’t for everyone, but if you’re a serious old school gamer this might just be your dream device.

Interested folks can pre-order here but keep in mind that shipping only starts later this summer.

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Why not a Raspberry PI with an emulator, or just a PC with an emulator? Many emulators out there handle upscale and scanlines.

Only a complete idiot would think about buying this, let alone actually buying it.
Why is it even on here? It's not news, some company have released an expensive clone product... Not new either.

What is the market for this? Collectors are not going to want it, certainly not "serious old school gamers". They will want a real NES or they are just going to play the games on their Wii or PCs through emulation. The high price and imo ugly design, I just don't see the point of this thing. I predict it will be a failure.

Edited by Bonfire, May 6 2014, 1:21pm :

I wanted one. I saw the price. I don't want it anymore. 499$ for an old CPU and an aluminum case? B*tch please...

I'll keep using my laptop connected on my TV, with an emulator and a NES/SNES controller adapter

$500? For a NES? That is the most expensive NES in the world! And it doesn't appeal to business customers because it doesn't have a keyboard, which makes it not a very good email machine.

Enron said,
$500? For a NES? That is the most expensive NES in the world! And it doesn't appeal to business customers because it doesn't have a keyboard, which makes it not a very good email machine.

Lol love it, god bless ya Steve (Ballmer)

Complete with having to blow on cartridges or having to pull them in and out multiple times until they work and then don't work again, I guess. And various other voodoo. I don't miss those HORRIBLE cartridges even a bit. Everyone hated them and everyone still does.

"When a user inserted the cartridge into the NES, the force of pressing the cartridge down and into place bent the contact pins slightly, as well as pressing the cartridge's ROM board back into the cartridge itself. Repeated insertion and removal of cartridges caused the pins to wear out relatively quickly and the ZIF design proved far more prone to interference by dirt and dust than an industry-standard card edge connector. Exacerbating the problem was Nintendo's choice of materials; the slot connector that the cartridge was actually inserted into was highly prone to corrosion.

Further, Nintendo used the "10NES" lockout chip, which required constant communication with the cartridge to authenticate it as a legal cartridge. When it didn't have the communication, the result was "the blinking red power light, in which the system appears to turn itself on and off repeatedly because the 10NES would reset the console once per second. ... Alternatively, the console would turn on but only show a solid white, gray, or green screen."

Oh, thank you so much essentially recreating one of the most horrible pieces of #### in consumer electronics. The fact the NES was one of if not the best (and my favorite) gaming platform ever is not enough, you should have avoided being oh so tight-assed "accurate".

The lockout chip was only in the North American NES, intended to prevent another video game crash by keeping the market from being flooded with unlicensed third party crap like the 2600.

It was only part of the problem though. The main issue was with the spring loaded ZIF design. Constantly bending the pins on the already loose connection soon wore them out of shape. The reason the "blowing on the cart" trick worked was because moisture from your breath created a better contact, temporarily. It also caused the connections to tarnish and did even more damage in the long run. As mentioned above the newer top loader NES fixed this problem.

No, they haven't fixed those issues, that's an internet myth. It was never fixed.
And how do I know? I've used those "top loader" consoles and they had exactly the same problems with the same voodoo solutions required.

It's not a myth, the biggest problem was the ZIF socket and toaster style loader. Those were eliminated in the top loader making it like every other cartridge based console in existence. Try cleaning your cartridges.

MrWhistler said,
wait now, nintendo is not putting a stop to this?

I don't know why they would, given they no longer sell the NES, and therefore give gamers no method to play their original NES cartridges (unless they expect you to pay again for emulated versions of games on the Wii / Wii U.. but that would be a bit of a dick move!)

A lot of the hardware patents for the NES are now expired and there have been clones for decades, this is nothing new really.

Can't say i like the design, retro gaming enthusiasts like original hardware so i'm not sure how popular it will be with that group.

Because you couldn't point to it and go "I spent $500 on that"

Also does the original NES do HD? Because this one doesn't either but they'll sell you an adapter for it (Sweet upscaled 256x240)

The original NES had support for antenna cables (at least mine is connected this way), so any upscaling is up to the TV based on the analogue signal.

The only point with this console, is to get rid of changing cables between my normal antenna cable and the one from the NES, since bridging them cause too much interference and kills my digital TV signal.

"and even generates scan lines so your old Duck Hunt Zapper gun now works with your brand new TV."

I'm still in disbelief about this adapter. I thought timing had more to do with it not functioning than just the scanlines detected by the Zapper, that's why it doesn't work with an emulator that has a scanline filter on an LCD screen.

The_Decryptor said,
Because you couldn't point to it and go "I spent $500 on that"

Also does the original NES do HD? Because this one doesn't either but they'll sell you an adapter for it (Sweet upscaled 256x240)


I'm pretty sure that you can upscale the original NES too! :) Most older consoles can actually be upscaled. You just need the right equipment to do so.

Thief000 said,
"and even generates scan lines so your old Duck Hunt Zapper gun now works with your brand new TV."

I'm still in disbelief about this adapter. I thought timing had more to do with it not functioning than just the scanlines detected by the Zapper, that's why it doesn't work with an emulator that has a scanline filter on an LCD screen.

You're correct, the issue has absolutely nothing to do with scanlines. The zapper works because the screen is blanked and a white box appears, this is why you see the screen flash when you fire it. The zapper looks for this white box to determine if you score or not. The issue with LCDs is timing, not scanlines.

The reason a lot of emulators (and some hardware devices) generate scanlines is so that the games look the way they are supposed to. The artwork was made with them in mind, and on modern LCDs a lot of old games just don't look right.

An original NES and Famicon are decades old hardware very pron to failure. This is a new product, with tech support.

Surely you cant blame them for trying to appeal a very specific market with these valid pros.

LimeMaster92 said,
Why not just buy an original official NES or Famicom? They are much cheaper. :)

You apparently never had to spend 20 minutes blowing into the cartridge, dancing in circles and popping the game down into the console a certain way to get it to work. The actual NES/Famicom consoles were horrible at not getting a good enough bite on the cartridges.

Gerowen said,

You apparently never had to spend 20 minutes blowing into the cartridge, dancing in circles and popping the game down into the console a certain way to get it to work. The actual NES/Famicom consoles were horrible at not getting a good enough bite on the cartridges.

Replacement 72 pin connectors for the NES can be bought for peanuts.

Gerowen said,

You apparently never had to spend 20 minutes blowing into the cartridge, dancing in circles and popping the game down into the console a certain way to get it to work. The actual NES/Famicom consoles were horrible at not getting a good enough bite on the cartridges.


You only need to blow once or twice, which takes a few seconds. You must have not really taken care of your cartridges. :o

LimeMaster92 said,

You only need to blow once or twice, which takes a few seconds. You must have not really taken care of your cartridges. :o

I got 99% of mine 2nd hand from friends, family, etc., so no, they probably weren't taken care of. The SNES largely fixed the issue, and I don't think I ever had a game not work on the N64 when it was inserted, but I've never used an NES that didn't require at least "some" fiddling to get a game to work.

Gerowen said,

I got 99% of mine 2nd hand from friends, family, etc., so no, they probably weren't taken care of. The SNES largely fixed the issue, and I don't think I ever had a game not work on the N64 when it was inserted, but I've never used an NES that didn't require at least "some" fiddling to get a game to work.


Ah, I see! Good condition ones work fine without much hassle. :)