Super Bowl 2013 WiFi network designed to handle 30,000 connections

Later today, the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens are scheduled to battle underneath the Superdome in New Orleans for the 2013 Super Bowl. Over 73,000 people will be attending the NFL championship match, and it's a good bet that the vast majority of them will have smartphones in their hands that will be taking pictures, streaming video and chattering away on social networks.

Ars Technica reports that the Superdome has put in place a new WiFi network that is supposed to handle 30,000 connections at once. There are over 700 wireless access points installed inside the stadium, and another 250 access points have been put in place outside the Superdome in places like parking lots and the stadium's Champions Square. The actual hardware is made by Cisco.

As with the 2012 Super Bowl in Indianapolis, Verizon Wireless installed the WiFi network inside and outside the Superdome for today's match. Last year, the Indianapolis Super Bowl WiFi network had a maximum of 8,260 simultaneous connections so in theory the Superdome's network should be able to cope with much greater demand.

People who come into the stadium today will have their smartphones subjected to a frequency scan. If they are found to be running on the same frequency as the Superbowl's WiFi network, they will be either have their frequency changed or those devices will be prevented from entering the stadium so they don't interfere with the stadium's network.

Source: Ars Technica
Football player image via Shutterstock

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People who come into the stadium today will have their smartphones subjected to a frequency scan. If they are found to be running on the same frequency as the Superbowl's WiFi network, they will be either have their frequency changed or those devices will be prevented from entering the stadium so they don't interfere with the stadium's network.

If someone told me this, I would be ****ed off. As a consumer, maybe I did not know about this. Why should I change it? This wasnt included when I bought the ticket.

Pupik said,
Nice spot to run the likes of droidsheep

Droidsheep is old and does not work. dSploit is what you are looking for.

They need to setup Wifi hotspots like this for all College and NFL stadiums PERIOD. I go to many CFB games each year and the connection inside the stadiums are horrible. Forget 4G, I'm lucky to get 1G and even get or send a text message from the lack of connection.

Like every person in there is going to use the wifi all at once.
People are supposed to be there to watch the game, not do crap on their phones/tablets.

theres a lot of time at a game when theres no action. you figure a play lasts 10 seconds, followed by 30 seconds to a minute till the next play. plus if theres a flag that adds minutes. people will want to upload photos to instagram and fb. I don't think that many will connect to wifi when they have cell data, unless that gets bogged down.

not sure I follow this...
Are we reporting the fact that the wifi network can only handle less than 50% of the expected attendees?

That's what I'm seeing. There's going to be either close to or over 100,000 people in the Superdome.

And because of the cost to even get a ticket...you can count on all of them...ALL OF THEM uploading pictures..talking to their friends to yell...

"HEY!! I'M AT THE SUPERBOWL AND YOU AREN'T!!"

The Superbowl at Cowboys Stadium had cell setups for at least 80,000 users.

This will be a disaster.

As far as I could read, normal devices aren't supposed to connect to this Superbowl network.

It's this line:
"If they are found to be running on the same frequency as the Superbowl's WiFi network, they will be either have their frequency changed or those devices will be prevented from entering the stadium so they don't interfere with the stadium's network."