Tablet wars heating up: LG unveils Windows 7 tablet at Computex

The Computex tablet wars are heating up as LG unveils their first entry with the LG UX10.

With their prototype, featuring a 10.1" LED capacative screen, Intel Atom Z530, 1GB of RAM, a front facing webcam and SD expansion, LG is firing a hefty shot in the iPad's direction. Users will also be able to output video to their television screens with the inclusion of a micro-HDMI output port.

Asus isn't the only manufacturer producing a tablet with Windows 7, as the UX10 will be released with Windows 7 Home Premium. This, coupled with 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi and the hefty hardware of the UX10 is shaping up to be quite the capable package.

Microsoft seems to be flexing its mobile muscle and is ready to take on Apple in the mobile sector with an OS that they think is as versatile in the palm of your hands as it is on the desktop, with multiple manufacturers making the decision to go with the desktop heavy-hitter. Shown at the Microsoft Computex booth, the company is set to position itself as a serious competitor in the entertainment tablet market. This combined with attractive hardware could be the one-two punch that is needed to even the playing field with the current leader, Apple.

Image Credit: Engadget.com

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61 Comments

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On my computer, I have very few programs installed. A tablet with apps would give me more possibilities. Sorry, I just don't think having a FULL OS will be helpful. Those pieces of software (freeware) are not designed for a touch interface. Sure, blow up the DPI and you get bigger buttons, but that dosen't do enough in CS4.

Here we go again, Apple comes out with something and everyone else tries to grab a piece of the pie...
Can't they come up with something new?

I too would prefer Windows 7 on a Tablet, a full blown OS means endless possibilities. That said, if it was OSx86 compatible, i think i'd give that a go too

battery time of 10hours is possible with windows 7 on the device. and i dont understand why its so difficult using windows 7 using touch input?
the Asus EEE Pad comes with a stylus. And if they supply a foldable keyboard and a small mouse it would be perfect for someone like me. Sit on a table. Take out ur eee pad. Attach it to the foldable keyboard as it becomes a notepad.... everything i want from a portable device.

Why is there no way. how is a Pad/tablet device any different from netbooks ? and the Samsung N210 claims to have 12 hour battery times. and realistic battery times of 8-9, these can easily be changed into a tablet form factor since you ditch the keyboard and the hinge and extra structural elements to support both the main body and screen.

Now combine this with Intels new hardware and reference netbook that is ponly 14 mm thick, and make that into a pad structure and you should be able to get at least 10mm "pads"

ah let it go already FFS. Full OS Operating systems on devices of this size are dead already. Poor battery life and 1GB ram...gtfo. This device like every other one will remain a niche and in the minority. Either bring out WP7 tablet or move Win7 embedded onto ARM achitecture until then youre just wasting your time with the same **** ive seen, tried, and seen fail before.

Osiris said,
ah let it go already FFS. Full OS Operating systems on devices of this size are dead already. Poor battery life and 1GB ram...gtfo. This device like every other one will remain a niche and in the minority. Either bring out WP7 tablet or move Win7 embedded onto ARM achitecture until then youre just wasting your time with the same **** ive seen, tried, and seen fail before.

Even Win7 on ARM won't help much since Win7 wasn't designed for touch input.

Northgrove said,

Even Win7 on ARM won't help much since Win7 wasn't designed for touch input.

Err yes, it was actually, it even supports multitouch built in. and when you connect a touch screen, or unfortunately, a tablet it will make buttons and certain other stuff larger and more touch friendly.

So Yes, windows 7 was most definitely designed with touch in mind.

Osiris said,
ah let it go already FFS. Full OS Operating systems on devices of this size are dead already. Poor battery life and 1GB ram...gtfo. This device like every other one will remain a niche and in the minority. Either bring out WP7 table or move Win7 embedded onto ARM achitecture until then youre just wasting your time with the same **** ive seen, tried, and seen fail before.

(1) "Poor battery life" - You're already wrong there. Over 10 hours of battery life is more than enough.

(2) "1 GB of RAM" - That is enough for Windows 7.

(3) "Full operating systems on this device size are dead already" - Not true. Give one valid reason as to why you think that's true. Everything is touch friendly in Win7, I have no problem using ONLY the touchscreen on my Tablet. To right click, instead of touching and holding, try pressing one finger down, and then touching a second finger, and it'll right click faster.

Osiris said,
ah let it go already FFS. Full OS Operating systems on devices of this size are dead already. Poor battery life and 1GB ram...gtfo. This device like every other one will remain a niche and in the minority. Either bring out WP7 tablet or move Win7 embedded onto ARM achitecture until then youre just wasting your time with the same **** ive seen, tried, and seen fail before.


Ya, I'd rather have a tablet that can only run widgets I purchase from a store than a tablet that will let me have full access to what a normal PC would give me....

andrewbares said,

(1) "Poor battery life" - You're already wrong there. Over 10 hours of battery life is more than enough.

(2) "1 GB of RAM" - That is enough for Windows 7.

(3) "Full operating systems on this device size are dead already" - Not true. Give one valid reason as to why you think that's true. Everything is touch friendly in Win7, I have no problem using ONLY the touchscreen on my Tablet. To right click, instead of touching and holding, try pressing one finger down, and then touching a second finger, and it'll right click faster.

10hrs battery life was for the eeepad running Win7 EMBEDDED. And even then I question if that 10hrs was in slate mode or was clocked up with the combo of the keyboard dock, which appears to house a larger battery.

Let me make this clear for all you full OS nuts out there.

C2D or even Atom achitecture cannot, CANNOT deliver all day battery life, its that simple. As for the 1GB being enough, yes it would be enough but I tend to think consumers also favour quick, resposive experiences. For which a low volt C2D and 1GB ram do not deliver.

Here's the kicker, i, and I'm sure most other people are willing to sacrifice some battery life for a full capable OS. I want to be able to browse my network and manage files and be able to do anything a full-capable PC can do.

Another way this thing can be used is for retail business. I'm waiting for one of those Windows machines to attach a bluetooth barcode reader and use my .NET expertise to build a retail app.

Most people don't have an idea what a thing like this can do with a full OS.

Here's the kicker, i, and I'm sure most other people are willing to sacrifice some battery life for a full capable OS. I want to be able to browse my network and manage files and be able to do anything a full-capable PC can do.

Another way this thing can be used is for retail business. I'm waiting for one of those Windows machines to attach a bluetooth barcode reader and use my .NET expertise to build a retail app.

Most people don't have an idea what a thing like this can do with a full OS.

CarlDilone said,
Here's the kicker, i, and I'm sure most other people are willing to sacrifice some battery life for a full capable OS. I want to be able to browse my network and manage files and be able to do anything a full-capable PC can do.

Another way this thing can be used is for retail business. I'm waiting for one of those Windows machines to attach a bluetooth barcode reader and use my .NET expertise to build a retail app.

Most people don't have an idea what a thing like this can do with a full OS.


I have, since I've used it on a tablet. And I can tell you that yes, you can do everything above, it's as complex as Windows 7 is. But it's also quite frustrating to use. The virtual keyboard doesn't integrate seamlessly with the OS like on touch operating systems, you're expected to use a mouse since many apps needs right-clicking functionality, and the workarounds for these things in Windows 7 are as awkward as those on Windows CE.

You don't even have to try it for long to realize the problems. A few hours after purchase and you'll notice.

Edited by Northgrove, Jun 1 2010, 12:03pm :

Northgrove said,

I have, since I've used it on a tablet. And I can tell you that yes, you can do everything above, it's as complex as Windows 7 is. But it's also quite frustrating to use. The virtual keyboard doesn't integrate seamlessly with the OS like on touch operating systems, you're expected to use a mouse since many apps needs right-clicking functionality, and the workarounds for these things in Windows 7 are as awkward as those on Windows CE.

You don't even have to try it for long to realize the problems. A few hours after purchase and you'll notice.

One extra touch to pull the keyboard up isn't too bad, and for right-click you can either hold down, or press with one finger and then tap with the other if you don't like waiting. I wouldn't call it awkward at all...

Here's the kicker, i, and I'm sure most other people are willing to sacrifice some battery life for a full capable OS. I want to be able to browse my network and manage files and be able to do anything a full-capable PC can do.

Another way this thing can be used is for retail business. I'm waiting for one of those Windows machines to attach a bluetooth barcode reader and use my .NET expertise to build a retail app.

Most people don't have an idea what a thing like this can do with a full OS.

CarlDilone said,
Most people don't have an idea what a thing like this can do with a full OS.

The short answer is...it can do everything a computer can do, including running iPad level widgets on the desktop.

Meph said,
I'd much rather have a desktop OS on a tablet than a phone OS.

Then get a mouse and keyboard to go with your desktop OS. This thing will fail. The most successful tablets will come from Apple, Google, and HP and not necessarily in that order. And that will be because the phone OS has been built with touch input in mind from the ground up and not just by placing touch elements within it. I'm just looking at how small those task bar icons are. Perfect example of how Windows (in any flavor) isn't a touch OS. Sure you'll have the luxury or running Photoshop on this thing or any of these desktop OS tablets but will it be usable in a productive way? Probably not.

Edited by asdavis10, Jun 1 2010, 11:51am :

Meph said,
I'd much rather have a desktop OS on a tablet than a phone OS.

What I prefer is, full desktop OS but with some sort of special interface added to it to make the desktop, navigation, internet etc easier and more touch friendly, with keeping the full power of the OS.

Meph said,
I'd much rather have a desktop OS on a tablet than a phone OS.

Says someone who hasn't used a desktop OS on a tablet. The entire widget system is based on accurate pointing and navigation, and a two, sometimes three, button mouse.

Didn't Windows CE teach you anything?

Edited by Northgrove, Jun 1 2010, 12:27pm :

kInG aLeXo said,

What I prefer is, full desktop OS but with some sort of special interface added to it to make the desktop, navigation, internet etc easier and more touch friendly, with keeping the full power of the OS.

Windows have settings to change icons and stuff like that to a bigger size...

Meph said,
I'd much rather have a desktop OS on a tablet than a phone OS.

+1

I totally agree. I think and hope Microsoft is listening to all of us who are the fan of the desktop OS by working on making a hybrid of the two. Give us full OS capability with a mobile environment. It's not easy and takes a lot of time and money. I think we'll see a huge integration between Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8. We and they (Microsoft) have to see how people will adapt or like the Metro UI to see whether to go that way with the moblie tablet/slate OS or stick with the desktop OS.

Meph said,
I'd much rather have a desktop OS on a tablet than a phone OS.

Agreed. I want a real computer to run real applications, not a toyPad running underpowered widgets.

asdavis10 said,

The most successful tablets will come from Apple, Google, and HP and not necessarily in that order.

Well one of them better put windows on one of them then... i dont need a huge phone withhout phone functions, if one actually had a pen and handwriting recognition though that would give it a chance, but that wont happen with any mobile os

This isn't a tablet though, and neither is the Asus, wich is why asus calls it an eee pad, while they have an entirely different product named the eee tablet. the tablet is aimed at artists and people who need to sketch stuff and has an actual pressure sensitive tablet.

HawkMan said,
This isn't a tablet though, and neither is the Asus, wich is why asus calls it an eee pad, while they have an entirely different product named the eee tablet. the tablet is aimed at artists and people who need to sketch stuff and has an actual pressure sensitive tablet.

That would be called a "Graphics tablet"
Tablet used in the regards obviously means form factor...

Edited by ZeroHour, Jun 1 2010, 10:43am :

ZeroHour said,

That would be called a "Graphics tablet"
Tablet used in the regards obviously means form factor...

The form factor would be pad or slate. You can't use the same name for the form factor as a name that already exist for another class of PC, namely the Tablet PC.

Which is why Asus decided to name their devices eee tablet and eee pad.

HawkMan said,

The form factor would be pad or slate. You can't use the same name for the form factor as a name that already exist for another class of PC, namely the Tablet PC.

Which is why Asus decided to name their devices eee tablet and eee pad.

Back when tablets first starting showing face, I remember there being two different versions. One being convertible where there was a keyboard attached that just flipped and folded under the screen. Then there was was the tablet where there wasn't a keyboard at all. I love the slate and would much rather call it the slate but I did see the slate being advertised as a tablet way back in the day when tablets first started appearing. They just didn't take off and everyone stopped making them. I swore I'd never buy a convertible and only the tablet. Now it's being renamed the slate by most so I will just the bandwagon and start calling it slate too. It's a better more descriptive name for it anyways.

It's true though that you can't have two products of two different form factors with the same name. It's too confusing for the consumer. I need a new "graphics tablet". Mine just went on me recently. Anyone know of a good one? Just need a medium sized one unless it's the right price.

p.s. Can't wait for next summer. By then, we'll have all that's promised for the '10 holiday season but with a little experience and insight into what we really want in these devices. So just better hardware. I've been waiting since first hearing about tablets(now slates) years back. I feel old now lol