TDK develops technology to double hard drive space

While getting a solid state drive in your PC desktop or notebook may be very sexy to some people, especially in terms of fast boot times and quick application launches, the truth is that SSDs are still much more expensive compared to good old fashioned mechanical hard drives. That being said, those hard drives are getting bigger and bigger by the quarter in terms of its storage space. Two TB hard drives are now being sold and even larger drives are coming in the future.

Now there's word that TDK has developed a technology that, if it really works, could instantly double the storage space on regular hard drives. As The Register reports, the technique involves what is known as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR). While details are still a bit sketchy, the idea is that a laser, combined with a new way to make the hard drive platters, will be used to basically double the amount of data that can be stored on one hard drive platter.

TDK has reportedly used the HAMR technique to create a two TB hard drive using platters that would normally only have enough space for one TB of data storage. The article points out if this technology is used on a four platter, four TB hard drive it would effectively create a massive eight TB drive. So far there's no word on how much a HAMR-based hard drive would cost in relation to a standard drive. There's also no word on when, or even if, a HAMR-based hard drive would become commercially available.

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Does that mean Nero and bunch of other second rate companies will probably put inside their "full suites" an HDD Burning Studio, too?

cralias said,
Does that mean Nero and bunch of other second rate companies will probably put inside their "full suites" an HDD Burning Studio, too?

HAHA!

GS:mac

Darren Boudreau said,
It would be fine if it could be implemented between now and by the time 2TB SSD's reach just below $99 US.

2TB SSDs don't even exist and won't for many years, and then at $99...we'll probably have 20 TB hard drives by then.

I think you missed the idea behind the tech, this is exclusive to physical HDDs and would require new hardware, no firmware upgrade could make a laser magically install in an HDD lol

I'm afraid of too rushed firmware or the like...

I could really use a Thunderbolt RAID @6+ TB with 100% redundancy (I'm paranoid), so effectively 12TB of HDDs, which means 4x 3TB Westies (which is what I trust the most - nothing less!).

that makes (atm) about 600€ for the storage space alone... Let alone an affordable RAID enclosure, that will let me install even higher grade drives in future (say for example 4TB drives or 5TB, whatever).

I'd like this to be a one-off purchase so I can install SSDs later on, too when they become affordable at high capacities (cause let's face it, 4x 250 GB is crappy expensive and doesn't get the job done. I shoot RAW and Full HD, now tell me to go SSD atm haha )

Damn, I just want HDDs to die. QUICK to make room for SSDs as soon as they have proper space (>2TB)

Glassed Silver:mac

Glassed Silver said,
I'm afraid of too rushed firmware or the like...

I could really use a Thunderbolt RAID @6+ TB with 100% redundancy (I'm paranoid), so effectively 12TB of HDDs, which means 4x 3TB Westies (which is what I trust the most - nothing less!).

that makes (atm) about 600€ for the storage space alone... Let alone an affordable RAID enclosure, that will let me install even higher grade drives in future (say for example 4TB drives or 5TB, whatever).

I'd like this to be a one-off purchase so I can install SSDs later on, too when they become affordable at high capacities (cause let's face it, 4x 250 GB is crappy expensive and doesn't get the job done. I shoot RAW and Full HD, now tell me to go SSD atm haha )

Damn, I just want HDDs to die. QUICK to make room for SSDs as soon as they have proper space (>2TB)

Glassed Silver:mac

They will never die as long other technologies don't catch them up on long lasting life, SSDs are a joke in that apartment. Precisely because the main function of a storage device is TO STORE, most of us want to have as much access and reliability on that data over the time.

I have an old, very noisy toshiba 2.5" 6gb harddrive that I use for installations of windows 7 by USB, it has not defective sectors and has been used for god knows how many times in it's original Kapok laptop, back in the 98' give me that with an SSD and then we may talk.

On another side, using lasers means that the diode will wear up very soon, just as optical hard drives and that would be by far worse.

Arceles said,

They will never die as long other technologies don't catch them up on long lasting life, SSDs are a joke in that apartment. Precisely because the main function of a storage device is TO STORE, most of us want to have as much access and reliability on that data over the time.

I have an old, very noisy toshiba 2.5" 6gb harddrive that I use for installations of windows 7 by USB, it has not defective sectors and has been used for god knows how many times in it's original Kapok laptop, back in the 98' give me that with an SSD and then we may talk.

On another side, using lasers means that the diode will wear up very soon, just as optical hard drives and that would be by far worse.

Er, in terms of reliability of storage, SSD would be superior. The only thing SSDs are limited by is the number of writes. With my high usage, my 2 year old OCZ Vertex II will last until year 2020 (and I'll have since upgraded by then, obviously). If you were only to use it for only occassional backups, an SSD would last you a lifetime.

SSDs don't have any moving parts, so you won't have to worry about it failing after it's been dropped. These things are pretty darn indestructible, they don't even bother shipping SSDs with any packing material.

If you drop that HDD, god knows what will happen to your data.

Don't bash the technology until you've tried it.

Spartan Erik said,

Er, in terms of reliability of storage, SSD would be superior. The only thing SSDs are limited by is the number of writes. With my high usage, my 2 year old OCZ Vertex II will last until year 2020 (and I'll have since upgraded by then, obviously). If you were only to use it for only occassional backups, an SSD would last you a lifetime.

SSDs don't have any moving parts, so you won't have to worry about it failing after it's been dropped. These things are pretty darn indestructible, they don't even bother shipping SSDs with any packing material.

If you drop that HDD, god knows what will happen to your data.

Don't bash the technology until you've tried it.

I ve tried them but I just don't trust the writes limit, hdds don't have that, sure... if you trow them they will die, however trowing an HDD is by far a possibility for most of the people, if you remove that HDDs still win.

Spartan Erik said,

If you drop that HDD, god knows what will happen to your data.

If you drop your laptop you'll probably break it too. Solution, don't drop things.

Enron said,
Worf: Captain, they are now locking LASERS on us.
Picard: Lasers?
Worf: Yes sir.
Riker: Lasers....

I remember an episode of TNG that had that exact same conversation. Can't remember the title though, but it made me LOL!

Glassed Silver said,

BR Backups? You sure got too much money, eh?
HDD backups is where it's at...

GS:mac

In your previous comment you are claiming big HDD can cause huge loss assuming you suggest we buy more HDD with smaller capacity which is more expensive than single HDD with more storage. Now you say BR is expensive. Well... either way it is expensive so for best redundancy I also think Blu-ray backups is best solution.

DaveBG said,

In your previous comment you are claiming big HDD can cause huge loss assuming you suggest we buy more HDD with smaller capacity which is more expensive than single HDD with more storage. Now you say BR is expensive. Well... either way it is expensive so for best redundancy I also think Blu-ray backups is best solution.


Uh huh!
I just realized that I got my mind twisted... It was too late/early to read that correctly...
I should have made more clear, that BD backups were NEVER good.
And the part about the big HDDs maximizing the loss, oh well, of cause that is sans making a backup.
(As in, you have ONE drive to rule it all and forget about backups ^^)

Either way, BR is NEVER the best solution, as you also have a much harder time making incremental backups/speedy backups.
Oh and yes, whatever HDD you pick and how many of those, doesn't matter, HDDs are unmatched in price per GB.
BRs don't come remotely close to that.

I can't see how one would suggest they are a viable option unless you really only got TINY amounts of data to backup (below 50GB or so)

Glassed Silver:mac

AdamLC said,
Kinda cool as long as its not too expensive to implement!

I think you should be saying, it's a HOT technology