Teacher aide fired for not providing Facebook password

The Facebook password saga appears to be continuing this week, after it was revealed that a school teacher's aide was fired last year for refusing to give her social networking password to her bosses.

It all seemed to unfold when the woman, named Kimberly Hester, comically posted in her spare time a picture of her with a co-workers pants and a pair of shoes, holding a caption saying “Thinking of you.” ZDNet reported that Hester was fired from Frank Squires Elementary in Cassopolis, Michigan after a parent saw the image on Facebook and made a complaint to the school.

Only in the past couple of weeks, Neowin reported a story of employers asking workers for their Facebook passwords and schools asking students to delete their profiles on the website. With Hester's legal battle ensuing though, she isn't giving up, saying "I did nothing wrong. And I would not, still to this day, let them in my Facebook. And I don’t think it’s OK for an employer to ask you."

There isn't much hope that she will succeed however, given that there isn't any law in the United States prohibiting employers to ask for access to their workers' Facebook accounts. The recent news coverage of the issue seems to have gotten law makers attention however, with proposals already in creation aimed at ending the password free for all.

Image Courtesy of USA Hitman.

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I'd go mad if they asked for mine - what I do in my spare time is up to me. Surely this woman is allowed to have her own spare time after the 9-5 work day. Work hard and play hard! Try not to mix the two though - work and beer don't mix, unless it's a nice and sunny Friday afternoon (obviously not at a school!). Bring on the weekend and more crazy Facebook photos. Then it's back to work mode on Monday. Oh Monday, the joys...

tonyjr said,
I'd go mad if they asked for mine - what I do in my spare time is up to me. Surely this woman is allowed to have her own spare time after the 9-5 work day. Work hard and play hard! Try not to mix the two though - work and beer don't mix, unless it's a nice and sunny Friday afternoon (obviously not at a school!). Bring on the weekend and more crazy Facebook photos. Then it's back to work mode on Monday. Oh Monday, the joys...

Absolutely she ought to be able to have her own time. However if she agreed to maintain a code of ethics (or similar such rules - all too darn common today) while being an employee with the school in question then should they find she violated them she's subject to penalty up to an including termination in most cases. The linked article hints that the school never ended up even seeing the photo in question. The question here is did the school terminate her for such a violation of their own rules OR did they terminate her over the demand for a facebook password issue (separate issue from the pic circulated on fb). The ZDnet story suggests it was in fact the latter, and if that is the actual documented case, suspect this is going to court on those and related grounds if not quietly settled prior to that - more likely. It sounds like she could have a decent test case though, it's not by any means a slam dunk and if was an attorney looking for a case to set precedence this wouldn't be one I would prefer to take to the courtroom.

Plain and simple answer to this was born during one of the darkest times in US history. From the great depression many labor unions were born to protect the rights of workers who were being treated unfairly or unjustly and to have an organization that will negotiate with the employer regarding all matters. If this teacher were part of a labor union, the union would have stepped up and said "If you fire her, you may as well close your doors, as the union which is run by your employees agrees that this is unjust and unfair." Unions are all but necessary in a democracy, with out them, we are back to being a republic.

Invizibleyez said,
Plain and simple answer to this was born during one of the darkest times in US history. From the great depression many labor unions were born to protect the rights of workers who were being treated unfairly or unjustly and to have an organization that will negotiate with the employer regarding all matters. If this teacher were part of a labor union, the union would have stepped up and said "If you fire her, you may as well close your doors, as the union which is run by your employees agrees that this is unjust and unfair." Unions are all but necessary in a democracy, with out them, we are back to being a republic.

You may want to contract with Mrs. Hester for some more history lessons, the US was founded as and has always been a Republic. JHC it's even in the darn PoA.

I have two facebook accounts, one that is personal and locked down and the other is more casual for co-workers and colleagues. The email on my resume matches the email for the secondary facebook account; the password is also generic and has no personal ties to my personal accounts. People can argue that it is an invasion of privacy (which I agree) but why not beat them at their own game?

Nexus69 said,
I have two facebook accounts, one that is personal and locked down and the other is more casual for co-workers and colleagues. The email on my resume matches the email for the secondary facebook account; the password is also generic and has no personal ties to my personal accounts. People can argue that it is an invasion of privacy (which I agree) but why not beat them at their own game?

At last, someone with similar "ethics" as myself regarding this issue.

I appreciate the media coverage on this issue. This thing needs the attention it is getting, because right now workers rights are taking blow, after blow. High unemployment is to blame for this. As the line of potential workers grows, employers will increasingly scrutinize their current work force.

Now that being said, the communication done on Facebook is somewhere between private/personal and public. Employers should be allowed to fire someone based on the public image that person promotes (through whatever means, facebook or being drunk at a bar). But asking for someone's password is an attempt to dig into their personal life (that has not been made public), and that is wrong.

Oh well. Looks like I'd be creating a separate Facebook account for work. I already have 2 Facebook accounts anyway, so the work account would be my 3rd one. That 3rd account would have all info intentionally left blank and dull.

No way in hell I'd let my future boss see all my info on my first account (the one I use the most - all my family and hearing friends, both elementary school and college - and yes privacy settings are intact). The 2nd account is for the members of the deaf community (in *shudders* high school), infamous for their backstabbing - I left that 2nd account blank and dull, just as well as my future 3rd account for work.

Goes to show how dumb the employers actually are.

Edited by MtnDewCodeRedFreak, Apr 3 2012, 3:26pm :

MtnDewCodeRedFreak said,
Oh well. Looks like I'd be creating a separate Facebook account for work. I already have 2 Facebook accounts anyway, so the work account would be my 3rd one. That 3rd account would have all info intentionally left blank.

No way in hell I'd let my future boss see all my info on my first account (the one I use the most).


What do you do that requires you to have a Facebook account for work out of curiosity? Also, don't get caught or your personal accounts will be deleted because of one of the terms.

"You will not create more than one personal profile."

ILikeTobacco said,

What do you do that requires you to have a Facebook account for work out of curiosity? Also, don't get caught or your personal accounts will be deleted because of one of the terms.

"You will not create more than one personal profile."

I don't care. On my 2nd account, I made a nickname instead of my real name so the deafies will never find me on my 1st one. Also, I made a totally separate email address for logging in my 2nd account and that email address is an AIM (not AOL - AIM have "@aim.com" email addresses ever since 2006) one, lol.

Also, regarding the question abt FB account for work, well duh. I don't want my future employer snooping in my 1st account's profile with all pics and info.

Facebook is dumb to open users to any email addresses instead of just their .edu ones like they did in the past.

MtnDewCodeRedFreak said,

I don't care. On my 2nd account, I made a nickname instead of my real name so the deafies will never find me on my 1st one. Also, I made a totally separate email address for logging in my 2nd account and that email address is an AIM (not AOL - AIM have "@aim.com" email addresses ever since 2006) one, lol.

Also, regarding the question abt FB account for work, well duh. I don't want my future employer snooping in my 1st account's profile with all pics and info.

Facebook is dumb to open users to any email addresses instead of just their .edu ones like they did in the past.

I was just sayin to be careful so you don't get one/all deactivated.

What I meant with Facebook for work was does your work require it? A friend of mine is a Red Bull rep which is all about being public and connecting to the community. He has a Facebook and Twitter account specifically for work, as well as personal accounts. It is a job requirement for him.

ILikeTobacco said,

I was just sayin to be careful so you don't get one/all deactivated.

What I meant with Facebook for work was does your work require it? A friend of mine is a Red Bull rep which is all about being public and connecting to the community. He has a Facebook and Twitter account specifically for work, as well as personal accounts. It is a job requirement for him.

I'm applying for a lot of jobs at the moment, so I'm just staying one step ahead of the employers via planning on making that 3rd account if this trend continues.

MtnDewCodeRedFreak said,

I'm applying for a lot of jobs at the moment, so I'm just staying one step ahead of the employers via planning on making that 3rd account if this trend continues.

Smart man...or women... whatever.

Facebook is dumb to open users to any email addresses instead of just their .edu ones like they did in the past.

What??????????

Mark Zuckerberg - Net Worth: $17.5 Billion and climbing. Really dumb move huh?

Simple solution: Do not use Facebook (or any other social networking site) There that solves the whole problem. But if you do insist on using Facebook (or other social networking) do not post things that: 1. Might be considered offensive. 2. has anything to do with your place of employment. 3. Anything illegal... I can of course keep going, but this is the basics; I have taught my Daughter to never use her real name, never give out personal information to anyone online, and she is 10! She does not have nor does she want a Facebook account, neither do I. So if a 10 year old can understand how stupid it is to 'post' information on the internet, why can't adults? Why do we as adults start whining and boo hooing when a employer demands that we give them access to Facebook? If you do not post stupid stuff, then you don't have to worry about getting in trouble.

Slaquor said,

If you don't fly on planes you'll never be in a plane crash. Still doesn't make it practical.

Well, a plane could fall out of the sky and crash on you.

Another reason Facebook needs to die.. but also that people not be so damn stupid and FRIEND you're students, parents of students and co-workers... I mean people are ignorant!
But Facebook even came and said that it would open up issues with privacy and violating rights.

Why in the world would that picture have upset a parent so much? Sounds like "someone" was just trying to be a b***...

M_Lyons10 said,
Why in the world would that picture have upset a parent so much? Sounds like "someone" was just trying to be a b***...

Because if you are a parent, you want the best possible person to be their teacher. That means being responsible, smart, etc.... Chances are it was an uptight parent.

Well theres 2 sides to this story.
First she was pretty dumb to post those pics and have them set to public. When I worked at a summer camp our boss required all of us to set our profiles to private and remove any bad profile pics. He would even say that he would do random facebook checks to make sure of this.
Second as far as Facebook passwords, its against Facebooks terms of service for employers to ask for passwords. I understand that they would want to check her profile out to make sure there are not any more pictures, but heck is isn't enough if they just check here public profile for any pics that should be private?

This is retarded, first off it is an invasion of privacy to log onto someone elses account anywhere posing as them, it is a crime to represent your self as another person, a federal crime for impersonating an officer of the law. However if you have a facebook account, your privacy has pretty much gone out the window. No matter how you lock down your account there, it is still easily accessible by anyone. So any information you post there you might as well broadcast on the evening news.

As for @ILIKETOBACCO I lived in Michigan for almost two years the thing I hated the most about it is that it was one of the worst right to work states there is, many employers there (this was in 99/2000) were asking for email passwords so they could monitor that you dont sell company secrets. These were not government or even state local businesses either, one of them was a lawn care company I had worked for, after my 90 day probation they wanted email info, and anything else they could get. Your personal information is personal and should stay that way, no one should have the right to ask for it....

microjunk said,
...

I am with you on that. I think all states should have right to work. That being said, anyone has the right to ask for anything but you should also have the protection of the law to say no to things that are truly unreasonable. In this particular case, teachers are expected to be careful about things they show to the public. It is part of their job to maintain that role model image so I am a bit torn. The image she supposedly posted I wouldn't consider grounds for firing a teacher, however I do believe schools should retain the right to get rid of teachers that put out an image that no parent would agree with, lets say illegal drug use.

microjunk said,
This is retarded, first off it is an invasion of privacy to log onto someone elses account anywhere posing as them, it is a crime to represent your self as another person, a federal crime for impersonating an officer of the law. However if you have a facebook account, your privacy has pretty much gone out the window. No matter how you lock down your account there, it is still easily accessible by anyone. So any information you post there you might as well broadcast on the evening news.

As for @ILIKETOBACCO I lived in Michigan for almost two years the thing I hated the most about it is that it was one of the worst right to work states there is, many employers there (this was in 99/2000) were asking for email passwords so they could monitor that you dont sell company secrets. These were not government or even state local businesses either, one of them was a lawn care company I had worked for, after my 90 day probation they wanted email info, and anything else they could get. Your personal information is personal and should stay that way, no one should have the right to ask for it....

I agree. It is personal information and they have no right to even ask you for such a thing. There definitely needs to be a law. I wouldn't provide them with my information either.

M_Lyons10 said,

I agree. It is personal information and they have no right to even ask you for such a thing. There definitely needs to be a law. I wouldn't provide them with my information either.

They actually do have a right to ask anything, regardless of how personal it is, as long as it has to do with the job in question. The school can easily argue that a teacher will be unable to do her job if her students don't respect her or look up to her in a particular way, which can be proven/disproved using simple studies, if they haven't been done already.

Part of the job description of a teacher is to be a role model to their students. If an employee does anything that compromises their ability to fulfill their ability to do any task on the official job description, that is all it takes to legally fire someone even in right to work states. That is one of the basic rights given to companies with by the Equal Opportunity Act.

ILikeTobacco said,

I am with you on that. I think all states should have right to work. That being said, anyone has the right to ask for anything but you should also have the protection of the law to say no to things that are truly unreasonable. In this particular case, teachers are expected to be careful about things they show to the public. It is part of their job to maintain that role model image so I am a bit torn. The image she supposedly posted I wouldn't consider grounds for firing a teacher, however I do believe schools should retain the right to get rid of teachers that put out an image that no parent would agree with, lets say illegal drug use.

right to work states are good in theory, but its just that a theory. In a right to work state, you have the right to work, you dont have the right to a job just because you are more qualified than anyone else. You also don't have the right to fight any wrongful termination with your employer either in or out of court ( I know I have tried, in Michigan and in Florida and Idaho). You also have to prove, in court, that your injury on the job was job related, and was serious enough to merit workers compensation. If you live or have lived in a right to work state, and been hurt on the job, you know how frustrating it is to be hurt and can't pay your bills, as the cost of living in right to work states is usually about 10 to 15 percent higher than anywhere else, not that cost of living makes a difference if you're hurt and cant work you have no money to pay bills anywhere....

microjunk said,
right to work states are good in theory, but its just that a theory. In a right to work state, you have the right to work, you dont have the right to a job just because you are more qualified than anyone else. You also don't have the right to fight any wrongful termination with your employer either in or out of court ( I know I have tried, in Michigan and in Florida and Idaho). You also have to prove, in court, that your injury on the job was job related, and was serious enough to merit workers compensation. If you live or have lived in a right to work state, and been hurt on the job, you know how frustrating it is to be hurt and can't pay your bills, as the cost of living in right to work states is usually about 10 to 15 percent higher than anywhere else, not that cost of living makes a difference if you're hurt and cant work you have no money to pay bills anywhere....

There are downsides to both ways. Also, each state has different laws regarding it. If you get terminated in a wrongfully in a right to work state, you can take it to court at any time. That is the entire point of right to work. The differences come in with what qualifies as wrongful however.

dotf said,

I remember when those concerns were handled by unions, not government.

I remember when jobs were kept in the United States because workers didn't abuse the powers of unions to drive up labor wages... but we are getting off topic now

So what you are saying is that the middle class and poor make too much? And the rich don't make enough?Maybe you would like to blame the cost of living on Unions also? You do realize these Jobs that you are arguing aren't being kept in the U.S. are going to people who make in a week what we make in a couple of hours? And do you know why our minimum wage is so much higher than what they do? And do you also realize that with minimum wage, you still need at least 1.5 jobs just to ALMOST be able to pay you bills? But lets blame unions, cause they fight for workers rights, and that is just unfair.

ILikeTobacco said,

I remember when jobs were kept in the United States because workers didn't abuse the powers of unions to drive up labor wages... but we are getting off topic now

Edited by Invizibleyez, Apr 3 2012, 8:13pm :

stop being an idiot and leave facebook to when you are away from work. They dont pay you to go on facebook and socialize.

Soldiers33 said,
stop being an idiot and leave facebook to when you are away from work. They dont pay you to go on facebook and socialize.

Read the article, it was in her spare time, not school hours. That isn't the issue.

Soldiers33 said,
stop being an idiot and leave facebook to when you are away from work. They dont pay you to go on facebook and socialize.

did u not read the article? it said she posted it in HER SPARE TIME, Not work spare time

A few of my customers don't even know what their facebook password is. The computer has been auto logging them onto facebook for so long they don't even know what the password is!

Also god forbid you ask them for their email password! Not only do they not know what that password is, they deny ever having one!

warwagon said,
A few of my customers don't even know what their facebook password is. The computer has been auto logging them onto facebook for so long they don't even know what the password is!

Also god forbid you ask them for their email password! Not only do they not know what that password is, they deny ever having one!

ROFL! +100 I see this all the time. It's enough to drive you insane!

warwagon said,
...

Having a technical helpdesk background, I can totally agree to this.
I can't count how many times customers wanted to argue that they never had a password.

Its invasion of my privacy. Fired? Why? The password to facebook is equal to the password to my bank account. What si up with these parents? Why did they feel the need to report something aas that?

If I was her, I would be seeking to sue the parents at the least.

TechieXP said,
Its invasion of my privacy. Fired? Why? The password to facebook is equal to the password to my bank account. What si up with these parents? Why did they feel the need to report something aas that?

If I was her, I would be seeking to sue the parents at the least.

If the courts allowed that lawsuit, whistle blowers would lose their protection. All the parent did was report improper behavior. Whether we agree if it is improper or not is another issue though. The school sided with the parent though.

ILikeTobacco said,

If the courts allowed that lawsuit, whistle blowers would lose their protection. All the parent did was report improper behavior. Whether we agree if it is improper or not is another issue though. The school sided with the parent though.

Probably because it was just easier for them.

Meanwhile, Facebook is no more special than any other site yet the older generation still treats it like its the end of the world. (& yes, I know I post status updates 24/7. I would post threads on forums 24/7 too, except most posts created for the sake of posting are locked...)

MASTER260 said,
Meanwhile, Facebook is no more special than any other site yet the older generation still treats it like its the end of the world. (& yes, I know I post status updates 24/7. I would post threads on forums 24/7 too, except most posts created for the sake of posting are locked...)

It has nothing to do with it being Facebook. If it were any other site it would be the same. The issue is that a teacher was posting what was deemed improper images in public where her students could see them. Most schools require staff to maintain a certain public image because part of their job is being role models.

One does have to wonder though, if it were in public, why can't the school officials just get on their Facebook and view them.

ILikeTobacco said,

It has nothing to do with it being Facebook. If it were any other site it would be the same. The issue is that a teacher was posting what was deemed improper images in public where her students could see them. Most schools require staff to maintain a certain public image because part of their job is being role models.

One does have to wonder though, if it were in public, why can't the school officials just get on their Facebook and view them.

Where does it say that students could see the photos? ZDNet says that the parent that complained was a Facebook friend of Hester's.

Without seeing the photo its hard to judge the validity of the complaint, but firing seems overkill here.

Colonel-Sanders said,

Where does it say that students could see the photos? ZDNet says that the parent that complained was a Facebook friend of Hester's.

Without seeing the photo its hard to judge the validity of the complaint, but firing seems overkill here.


Depends on how her account is set up. If friends of friends can see it, the child would be able to see it if the child was a friend with the parent who was a friend of the mom.

Not seeing the photo also meant the school decided to assume the worst. They weren't exactly left with a choice. If the picture wasn't that bad, the teacher should have just printed out a copy and given it to whoever was doing the inquiry. The teacher apparently also thought it wasn't a proper image and knew it would get her fired anyway.

ILikeTobacco said,
It has nothing to do with it being Facebook. If it were any other site it would be the same.


Don't recall MySpace users getting this treatment.

dotf said,


Don't recall MySpace users getting this treatment.


Does Google+ users get it? How about neowin users? Xbox live users? Please don't derail the topic. It has nothing to with the site it was posted on. It has to do with what was posted.

Haha, I wonder if in the UK you could get away with saying 'Sorry, I have a responsibility under the DPA to protect people's privacy and they have not agreed to let you access their data'

On legal grounds it may not be illegal to ask for the password, but it certainly is not a reason to sack the person for failing to give it.

However, like most of these stories there is probably more to the sacking.

stevember said,
On legal grounds it may not be illegal to ask for the password, but it certainly is not a reason to sack the person for failing to give it.

However, like most of these stories there is probably more to the sacking.


I'm told if she were to provide it, she would be in breach of the facebook tos. This is probably the angle she should pursue.


There isn't much hope that she will succeed however, given that there isn't any law in the United States prohibiting employers to ask for access to their workers' Facebook accounts.

I'm not too informed here but isn't there or shouldn't there be laws protecting peoples privacy too though?

dogmai79 said,

I'm not too informed here but isn't there or shouldn't there be laws protecting peoples privacy too though?

What? This is the US after all, won't you think of the children? /sarcasm

I don't understand how this is legal. Its like an employer asking for the keys to your house or access to your diary of something. Illegal search and seizure?

APAzero7 said,
I don't understand how this is legal. Its like an employer asking for the keys to your house or access to your diary of something. Illegal search and seizure?

It's not anything like that because she has the right to not give up the information, just like the school has the right to not to keep her on staff. Like I said above, I don't think it is a right to work state. It is only illegal search and seizure if she doesn't agree to it and they do it anyway.

APAzero7 said,
I don't understand how this is legal. Its like an employer asking for the keys to your house or access to your diary of something. Illegal search and seizure?

Wrong analogy.

It's like your employer asking you what your sexual preference is, what your religion is, how old you are, marital status and political preference. All of these are illegal to ask for yet they are available on Facebook. Oh, wait what?

UndergroundWire said,

Wrong analogy.

It's like your employer asking you what your sexual preference is, what your religion is, how old you are, marital status and political preference. All of these are illegal to ask for yet they are available on Facebook. Oh, wait what?

Half truth. They are only illegal to ask if they do not have anything to do with your job. Everyone one of your examples can be asked for certain jobs.

ILikeTobacco said,

Half truth. They are only illegal to ask if they do not have anything to do with your job. Everyone one of your examples can be asked for certain jobs.


Only if it is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ). Like Females only for an actress in a play. In the case of the teacher, all that can be revealed which is illegal.

So not revealing your Facebook Password to an Employer, one can sue because one can claim it was trying to get information on a protected category.

Just my two cents from working with the EEOC.

Edit: This applies to the U.S.

UndergroundWire said,

Only if it is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ). Like Females only for an actress in a play. In the case of the teacher, all that can be revealed which is illegal.

So not revealing your Facebook Password to an Employer, one can sue because one can claim it was trying to get information on a protected category.

Just my two cents from working with the EEOC.

Edit: This applies to the U.S.

I see what you are saying. The school should have asked for the picture directly. The problem with trying to sue for that claim is that she would need hard evidence. The school has the hard evidence it needs, in the form of a complaint, to ask for it to prove their intentions were about the picture, not anything else.

ILikeTobacco said,

I see what you are saying. The school should have asked for the picture directly. The problem with trying to sue for that claim is that she would need hard evidence. The school has the hard evidence it needs, in the form of a complaint, to ask for it to prove their intentions were about the picture, not anything else.


Exactly.

APAzero7 said,
I don't understand how this is legal. Its like an employer asking for the keys to your house or access to your diary of something. Illegal search and seizure?

Ok let me explain this better: What I meant was its like an employer asking for the keys to your house so they can go through your mail, messages, photos, and other personal things(underwear drawer) any time they please so they know you "better". And "illegal search and seizure" as far as seizing information for the sole intent of having it should the time come to use it against you: Blackmail. If they hired her its because they felt she was a proper fit for the job. Personally I think its a backfire for the employer showing that they don't respect their employees privacy which pretty much limits their future hiring pool.

1) Hide profile from all but friends
2) Deny having Facebook

That said, I dispise this trend of people asking for access. When did it start? Nobody has ever asked me, but it would be met with the same response as "May I read your bank statements" or "Can I come and observe you at a social function"

nik louch said,
1) Hide profile from all but friends
2) Deny having Facebook

That said, I dispise this trend of people asking for access. When did it start? Nobody has ever asked me, but it would be met with the same response as "May I read your bank statements" or "Can I come and observe you at a social function"

Option one works but option two results in you being fired for lying. No right to work means anything can be used. If they have a problem with you being "improper" online, they will definitely have a problem with you being dishonest in person.

nik louch said,
1) Hide profile from all but friends
2) Deny having Facebook

That said, I dispise this trend of people asking for access. When did it start? Nobody has ever asked me, but it would be met with the same response as "May I read your bank statements" or "Can I come and observe you at a social function"


Let me fix that for you.

1) Hide profile from all but friends.
2) Change profile pic to a picture that is not of you.
3) Have an email address strictly for social networks (meaning NOT YOUR RESUME EMAIL)
4) Tweak your privacy settings so only you can see your friends (that way no one can friend your friend and see they are friends with you.) Make sure you tweak anything else in there (like don't let friends check you in, tag photos, etc...)
5) Tweak your personal info and networks so only you can see it. (You know like Work history, school, number, etc...)
6) Deny having Facebook.

nik louch said,
1) Hide profile from all but friends
2) Deny having Facebook

That said, I dispise this trend of people asking for access. When did it start? Nobody has ever asked me, but it would be met with the same response as "May I read your bank statements" or "Can I come and observe you at a social function"

I don't see why people friend co workers and other teacher on Facebook in the first place.

TCA said,

I don't see why people friend co workers and other teacher on Facebook in the first place.


"It will never happen to me" mentality.

TCA said,

I don't see why people friend co workers and other teacher on Facebook in the first place.


Because those can be people you want to connect with. Just be careful who you connect with and what you share with them.

For example, I'm connected with my boss on Facebook, but he doesn't get to see all the posts or pictures I post because I share certain things with certain people.

TCA said,
I don't see why people friend co workers and other teacher on Facebook in the first place.

Uh, because they're frequently friends?

ILikeTobacco said,

Option one works but option two results in you being fired for lying. No right to work means anything can be used. If they have a problem with you being "improper" online, they will definitely have a problem with you being dishonest in person.

...and if your not lying? I don't have a facebook account, I don't have a G+ account, I never used myspace and I don't twatter and never will. I'm not alone, but the screwed up part is do you think an employer or interviewer would believe me these days?

(I understand this is not the case here, just saying)

Kirkburn said,

Uh, because they're frequently friends?

Bu they see them on a daily basis I am sure. I wouldn't want any of my co workers or teachers on mine...but maybe that's just me?

TCA said,

Bu they see them on a daily basis I am sure. I wouldn't want any of my co workers or teachers on mine...but maybe that's just me?


LOL...

That logic is screwed up. Probably depends a lot on your habits and use of FB though, I guess.

GS:win

If I am not mistaken, Michigan isn't a right to work state. Unless that changes, she could have been fired for much less. Teachers face all kinds of scrutiny from the public though. In many ways, more than police officers. The location police department has rules that police are not allowed to go to any bars, even during their off time, in this county. It wouldn't surprise me if similar rules don't also apply to teachers. It is all about keeping up the public image.

ILikeTobacco said,
If I am not mistaken, Michigan isn't a right to work state. Unless that changes, she could have been fired for much less. Teachers face all kinds of scrutiny from the public though. In many ways, more than police officers. The location police department has rules that police are not allowed to go to any bars, even during their off time, in this county. It wouldn't surprise me if similar rules don't also apply to teachers. It is all about keeping up the public image.

Which is all BS.
Private life means private life for a reason.

Screw public image.
I'll gladly have an odd guy teach my kids if I know he's happy in his/her free time and hence can concentrate fully on his/her job.
Taking away liberties can't work.
But yeah, give the nutwings and intolerant the peace of mind. Way to go.

GS:win