Technology for Legally Burning Copy-Protected Content

It's ironic: The copy protection created to stop the illegal copying of DVDs is the same technology that has prevented users from legally downloading paid-for content and then burning it to a DVD for playback in their living rooms. At the time the copy-protection rules were created, they had no provision for user recording of protected content to a recordable DVD, as opposed to a factory-replicated DVD-ROM.

All of that changed about a month ago. The DVD Copy Control Association passed an amendment to the Content Scramble System (CSS)--the copy protection used on commercial DVDs--specifying a standard for recording electronic downloads to recordable DVD media. The standard, dubbed Qflix, is still in its infancy, but already a movement is afoot to bring this technology to drugstores, and perhaps even to a PC desktop near you.

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News source: PCWorld

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It's aleady too late to worry about copyright infringement for most media content - most films / TV shows that are not available on DVD will end up on P2P as rips from TV or VHS anyway, so it is better to make some money now rather than less money in a few years time.

Anyway, the real money is in HD-DVD / Blu-ray and HDTV. By persuading consumers to be unhappy with content that will actaully fit onto a DVD, the industry hopes to lock us all into a new format with much more inconvenient to work around protection.

In other words, the industry has realised it cannot prevent people easily aquiring mediocre (but acceptable) quality content at little cost with little risk. The obvious solution is to raise the bar of what is considered acceptable, and so stop people wanting to watch DivX / Xvid that way. Would you happily watch a colour movie on a fuzzy black and white 15" TV? People used to have no problem with this.

The old business model was one based around two groups - those who could pay for something and those who went without. Things have now changed, and a third group - those who can afford something, but would rather get it for free - has sprung up. The trick is to get as much money from the new group by slashing prices, whilst still making lots of money on the first group by charging high prices for premium content.

Radiohead are one of the first to use the new business model. By releasing 'acceptable' quality music for almost free and then releasing top quality for £££, they make a small amount of money each from lots of people who would have otherwise got the music for 'nowt but lots of money from each die-hard Radiohead fan with disposable income.

Of course, this model only works if you have a good product to sell. The new Radiohead album probably sounds really nice (in terms of dynamic range etc) when played on a £1000 amp from their new expensive box set, but I doubt the same could be said of Beyonce's music!

Seriously, the MPAA should worry more about people who have stopped going to the movies because:

A) They are too expensive, when one considers the following items:
B) The poor quality popcorn and watered-down soda are ridiculously overpriced.
C) COMMERCIALS (not previews) that play after the start time...for a movie we have already PAID to watch.
D) The management does not police the the eight tweeners who are talking on cell phones in the front rows (let in for free by their employee friend no doubt) ruining the experience for the rest of the audience.

No wonder people are skipping anything but big event pictures and kids movies at theaters, reserving adult and date movies for DVD, where they can watch without all the issues above.

Sigh.

maybe like , we can have something built into the seat that will discourage people from bothering other people... like maybe have a system from online games where everyone can 'vote' for someone in the seats close to them, and when one guy gets enough 'votes' , something bad will happen, like their seats sinking way down so they have to stand up

like every seat has a keypad where each key represents a seat surrounding that seat, you press on a key to vote for the corresponding seat, and each key has a light under it to show which seat has voted for it, so if enough of the keys on the keypad lights up the seat will be 'punished'

i guess the companies are still missing the days of ARM, or Analogue Rights Management i.e. everytime you re-record a tape or video you'll degrade the quality, hence you have to buy another copy of the song or movie...

i WILL pay for music and movies, and i have, but if it involves crap like this then i'd rather not bother...

Consumers are NOT asking for this DRM "feature" and won't be buying, sorry.

It's amazing to me that as the "death to DRM" wave achieves unstoppable momentum that some of these throwback companies are still trying to make a case for their arguably failed business models. I guess they are trying to appease their stockholders, but any tech stock analyst who recommends investing in ANY DRM solutions provider these days ought to have his head examined...eesh.

specifying a standard for recording electronic downloads to recordable DVD media


That's the hidden snake that will bite someone in the ass. Somewhere, in this 'standard' will most likely be a way to allow a user to burn the content to a DVD, that will either scramble it during the burning process, or securely delete the DVD media from the hard drive after the burning is done. Leaving it unrecoverable, making sure if the person wants a second copy they'll have to purchase it again.

But... we can be assured that any protection scheme put into this will be cracked by someone.... quick.

And should be cracked. Somebody needs to stand up against these pig corporations who tell you they are the good guys but secretly hold meetings on how best to make money by systematically destroying everything around you.

xMorpheousx416 said,


That's the hidden snake that will bite someone in the ass. Somewhere, in this 'standard' will most likely be a way to allow a user to burn the content to a DVD, that will either scramble it during the burning process, or securely delete the DVD media from the hard drive after the burning is done. Leaving it unrecoverable, making sure if the person wants a second copy they'll have to purchase it again.

But... we can be assured that any protection scheme put into this will be cracked by someone.... quick.

Of which is total crap. If they were to ever implement this idea you mentioned to remove it from the hard drive after purchasing it legally, and then destroying the original file or format, and making me pay for it a second time will just do nothing more than promote even more stealing of movies and songs. The very reason is to make me pay for something I already paid for through means created by them in the first place. As was stated above, they need to stop making these blind shots in the dark.

"Well no you can't copy that. But well, yes you can. Well, no... but yeah. But no.


Well... yeah.


But no."

The second you give the user the ability to convert their DRM'd downloads into a format that's been openly hacked and cracked for years, then you defeat the purpose of DRM entirely.
There's nothing to stop a user downloading a protected file, burning it to DVD and then ripping it into a nice, small and clean XviD file. It's no different than downloading a DRM'd music file, then burning it to a CD so it can be ripped into a clean MP3.

It just proves that DRM does not work unless you completely remove the user's right to make a backup of their content, or to rephrase that: DRM just does not work.